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The Notorious Rake Mass Market Paperback – September 1, 1992


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Signet; First Edition edition (September 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451174194
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451174192
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.6 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #978,122 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Mary Balogh has won seven Waldenbook Awards and a B. Dalton Award for her bestselling romances, as well as a Romantic Times Lifetime Achievement Award. She is one of the romance genre's most popular and bestselling authors.

More About the Author

Mary Balogh is the New York Times bestselling author of the acclaimed Slightly novels: Slightly Married, Slightly Wicked, Slightly Scandalous, Slightly Tempted, Slightly Sinful, and Slightly Dangerous, as well as the romances No Man's Mistress, More than a Mistress, and One Night for Love. She is also the author of Simply Love, Simply Unforgettable, Simply Magic, and Simply Perfect, her dazzling quartet of novels set at Miss Martin's School for Girls. A former teacher herself, she grew up in Wales and now lives in Canada.

Customer Reviews

The publisher really needs to re-release it!
Rosamond1
Edmond's history is so well done and brilliantly fleshes out his character--transforming a seemingly heartless rake into a very deep, vulnerable man.
ellejir
This novel has great sweetness, humour and sadness at its core as well as Balough's wonderfully descriptive storytelling.
Cassia Van Arsdale

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Cassia Van Arsdale on February 24, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I loved this book. I generally don't read romances but have recently become addicted to Regencys, especially Mary Balough. This is my favourite so far. Lord Edmond Waite is completely surprised when he and Mary, Lady Mornington are thrown into each other company during an evening at Vauxhall Gardens. Forced to take shelter during a thunderstorm, Lord Edmond is overtaken by Mary's passionate lovemaking; he would never have expected such a thing from the very prim and proper bluestocking. He so awed he decides to make her his mistress. He's even more shocked when a week later he's fallen in love with her. Despite Mary's protests Lord Edmond pursues her voraciously even though she looks at him and his rakehell lifestyle with disgust, the only things she likes about him are his lovemaking (which isn't enough) and his aunt.
When they find themselves in each others' company at the aunt's houseparty Edmond attempts to make himself completely disgusting to Mary but finds he needs her emotional support when confronted by the family after fifteen years.
This novel has great sweetness, humour and sadness at its core as well as Balough's wonderfully descriptive storytelling.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 29, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Probably my all time favorite Balogh novel (and I've read just about all of them). The hero broke my heart.
Left to bear his family's grief and guilt over a horrible tragedy in his youth (think along the lines of the movie "Ordinary People"), the hero set out to prove he was every bit as terrible as they said he was. He is a rake who despises himself for being a rake. When he meets a lovely and passionate widow he sees the dream of love and family again within his grasp. . . but he cannot allow himself to reach out and take it. Only by healing his past (and having his father and brother accept their share of the responsibility) can the hero hope to have a future.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Client d'Amazon on April 29, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Notorious Rake starts quite surprisingly with what looks like the climax of a story: Mary Gregg, Lady Mornington, blames herself for letting her terror of thunderstorms push her into Lord Edmond Waite's arms one night in a secluded shelter at Vauxhall. Mary hates everything about Lord Edmond: he is a luscious, lewd, mocking and spiteful libertine, a rake of the worst kind, whose reputation makes him the black sheep among the ton. He's still accepted among his noble peers only because of his wealth and title, but everyone in London despises him, most of all Lady Mornington. She, on the other hand, evolves around the high ton; she's famous for the literary salons she organises every week, and she managed to keep her reputation intact despite the rumours of a liaison she might have had with a married male friend.
But on the night of Vauxhall, everything changes for Mary. Her unexplainable but nonetheless very real physical attraction to Edmond revolts her. And at first, when Edmond pursues her for days without taking no for an answer, the reader is bound to hate Lord Edmond Waite and his tactics that not any better than those of a stalker's.
And therein lies the strength of this story: the hero is a truly tortured character, who first offers to us the image he gives to the world, and whose true self is progressively uncovered both by the heroine and the reader, one step at a time. For Lord Edmond is a very tortured and loveable character, who put love to a far corner of his being long ago and decided not to bother with the painful emotion any more.
Lord Edmond's character is no doubt fascinating.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dr W. Richards on June 8, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Lady Mary Gregg is what is normally called a bluestocking: she dresses plainly, doesn't care for balls and parties, and prefers to spend her time discussing literature, philosophy and so on. She's far from the type of woman whom the known rake, Lord Edmond Waite, would be interested in - and yet, stranded alone together in Vauxhall Gardens in the middle of a thunderstorm, they discover each other in the most intimate way possible.
How could this have happened? This is exactly what Mary asks herself once she's home again. She hates men of Lord Edmond's type; he was a rake in the worst possible sense, and she was well aware that only a few months earlier he'd been involved in a scandal with another woman, who had apparently almost run off with him while engaged to another man. But Mary is terrified of thunderstorms due to a childhood trauma, and she knows that she can't exactly blame Lord Edmond for making love to her; in her terror, she had pleaded with him to do it. But it will never happen again. He is not her type. He is everything she despises... and yet. And yet she is powerfully attracted to him, as she has never been to any other man. Not even Marcus, the Earl of Clifton (hero of A Counterfeit Betrothal), who was her close friend for so many years.
As for Edmond, still stinging from Felicity's rejection, he is equally determined that Mary is not his type. Despite the fact that being with her haunts his dreams, he knows very well that he doesn't belong in her world, and he can't imagine her wanting to belong in his. And yet he is still attracted to her: Mary, the mousy bluestocking, a type of woman he tells himself is beneath his notice.
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