Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.00
  • Save: $4.12 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Unread copy in perfect condition.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $5.14
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Odyssey (Hardcover Classics) Hardcover – March 10, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0141192444 ISBN-10: 0141192445 Edition: Reprint

Buy New
Price: $17.88
37 New from $12.13 18 Used from $13.24 2 Collectible from $44.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.88
$12.13 $13.24
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books

Frequently Bought Together

The Odyssey (Hardcover Classics) + The Hound of the Baskervilles (Hardcover Classics)
Price for both: $34.46

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Hardcover Classics
  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics Hardcover; Reprint edition (March 10, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141192445
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141192444
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 1.4 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,025 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review



About the Author

Homer was probably born around 725BC on the Coast of Asia Minor, now the coast of Turkey, but then really a part of Greece. Homer was the first Greek writer whose work survives.

He was one of a long line of bards, or poets, who worked in the oral tradition. Homer and other bards of the time could recite, or chant, long epic poems. Both works attributed to Homer – the Iliad and the Odyssey – are over ten thousand lines long in the original. Homer must have had an amazing memory but was helped by the formulaic poetry style of the time.

In the Iliad Homer sang of death and glory, of a few days in the struggle between the Greeks and the Trojans. Mortal men played out their fate under the gaze of the gods. The Odyssey is the original collection of tall traveller’s tales. Odysseus, on his way home from the Trojan War, encounters all kinds of marvels from one-eyed giants to witches and beautiful temptresses. His adventures are many and memorable before he gets back to Ithaca and his faithful wife Penelope.

We can never be certain that both these stories belonged to Homer. In fact ‘Homer’ may not be a real name but a kind of nickname meaning perhaps ‘the hostage’ or ‘the blind one’. Whatever the truth of their origin, the two stories, developed around three thousand years ago, may well still be read in three thousand years’ time.


E. V. Rieu was a celebrated translator from Latin and Greek, and editor of Penguin Classics from 1944-1964. His son, D. C. H. Rieu has revised his work.


D. C. H. Rieu is the son of E. V. Rieu, celebrated translator from Latin and Greek and Editor of Penguin Classics from 1944-1964.


Peter Jones is former lecturer in classics at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Customer Reviews

The Rieu translation is excellent, exceedingly readable.
Mary E. Sibley
I had to read it in high school, and every now and then I read it again.
Brimarshay
If you love reading and Greek mythology then this is the book for you.
Lloyd Jen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

260 of 268 people found the following review helpful By T. Simons VINE VOICE on October 31, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is Alexander Pope's verse translation of the Odyssey, first published in 1726, glommed into a kindle edition. It is not formatted for the Kindle and is thus very difficult to read -- instead of stanzas, it's all oddly-broken chunks that vaguely resemble paragraphs, presumably an artifact of whatever software was used to scan the original text. To add to that, it's poetry *by Alexander Pope*, and thus largely in heroic couplets, deliberately archaic even to the ear of Pope's 18th-century contemporaries, with "thou"s scattered throughout -- there's a reason that William Wordsworth thought Pope's poetry archaic and artificial.

As this is a "kindle bestseller" but there aren't any other listed reviews, I suspect a lot of people are (like myself) downloading this for their kindles because it shows up readily in a search for "Odyssey", and then getting stymied by the five-hundred-"location" introductory essay (written, as best I can tell, in the early 1800's, and thus hopelessly outdated by little things like two hundred year's worth of Homerian scholarship, Schliemann's discovery of Troy, etc.) and the near-impenetrable arrangement of the text. If anyone can find a better-formatted free-download kindle version of the Odyssey (perhaps a prose translation?) please link me to it in a comment. Thanks.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
89 of 91 people found the following review helpful By Terri J. Rice TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 2, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This Kindle download is difficult to figure out. It begins with a very lengthy introduction by Theodore Alois Buckley, which might cause you to think you had downloaded a critique of the Odyssey and not the actual story. That is not so.

The actual translation of the Odyssey begins at 8% on the Kindle: "O Muse! resound; Who when his arms had wrougt the destined fall of sacred Troy, and razed her heaven-built wall, wandering from clime to clime, observant stray'd..."

"Now at their native realms the Greeks arrived; all who the wars of ten long years survived; and scaped the perils of the gulfy main."

It is the translation by Alexander Pope and you either like his translation or you don't; there are, I believe, easier ones to understand.

Buckley says,"It would be absurd, therefore, to test Pope's translation by our own advancing knowledge of the original text. We must content to look at it as a most delightful work in itself,-- a work which is as much a part of English literature as Homer himself is of Greek."

The Kindle edition has what I consider a major problem:

There is no Table of Contents so you can not jump to a particular book which is very unfortunate because when studying the book you want to do exactly that. The fix would be to add a Bookmark every time you come to a new book so that you can easily go back and forth. But that, obviously, would mean you have to read through the whole book bookmarking as you go which is why I gave this a four star instead of five star review for this Kindle edition.

But... it is free and free is a very good price.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
63 of 68 people found the following review helpful By A Reader on February 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
How frustrating that Wildside Press didn't include more with their complete text of Pope's translation. Not only is there no mention of Fenton and Broome, the two men who actually translated 12 of the 24 books--not only are none of Broome's notes included, but there is no annotation whatever, no bibliography of recommended further reading, no criticism, not even a decent history of the translation or of Pope himself, aside from a single reductive paragraph by Theodore Alois Buckley (who edited the text and wrote the rather flowery introduction--in fact there isn't even a date for the introduction--it's Victorian but Wildside doesn't make that clear). Even the back cover is misleading, attributing a Samuel Johnson quote to the Odyssey, when it referred explicitly to the Iliad. Finally, there is no line-numbering, so this edition would be difficult to teach or reference in a paper. Not a scholarly edition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By T. Bachman on September 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
I own a number of translations of Homer, and the Rieu/Jones translations of The Odyssey and The Iliad are among my favourite (the others are Albert Cook's and Mandelbaum's translation of The Odyssey). I like all these better than the Fagles since they are more faithful to the original text.

If you order this book, grab yourself a Cliff Notes just so you get the necessary background info so it all makes sense.

Good luck!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Kim on November 27, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I too like some of the reviewers was close to removing this free edition from my Kindle as I began to wonder when The Odyssey would begin. It starts at 8 % or location 413 on the third Kindle type size. The first 8% is a biography of Homer and a critique of Alexander Pope's translation of Homer's The Odyssey. I found the biography interesting and The Odyssey itself is a great Greek epic. A linked table of contents would have been nice and a page break between the foreword and the start of the actual work would have been appreciated. So I take off a star for that. With Kindle's bookmarking, highlighting, note adding feature, and search feature you can quickly find and go anywhere though from your Kindle menu so the point becomes moot. Then I add a half star back for it was free anyways.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Seth Davidson on November 14, 2008
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Alexander Pope's translation of Homer's Odyssey ranks as a wonderful lesson in how not to translate. Successive generations have pilloried Pope's wholecloth fabrication translation, in which he forces an unrhymed epic poem into the straitjacket of heroic couplets. No remark hits as aptly as that of Bentley's famous criticism: "A fine Poem, Mr. Pope, but you must not call it Homer."

Okay--let's not call it Homer. Let's call it "Pope's Epic Greek Poem Loosely Based on Homer," and then let's call it magnificent. In any language, and with any emendations, the Odyssey is an odyssey of sorts in the reading. Long, rambling, filled with a thousand references that only a footnoted text or Grecian scholar could explain, getting through this massive tale takes endurance, pluck, and courage.

Pope's version makes the rough parts easier going, and makes the great parts positively, well, English. When Ulysses returns home and smashes the jaw of the impudent slave, crushing the bone and bathing the floor in blood, it's enough to make you feel like you're watching the Raiders play at home. The goosebump sections are so powerful and speak with such majesty through the genius of Homer and the genius of Pope, that you'll fling down the Kindle in search of a Trojan War and a ten year journey home.

That was the blind poet's intent, right? Right.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?