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Comment: Very good hardcover in a Good + DJ, covered with mylar. Book is clean and tight. Former owner's name neatly written on front endpaper; otherwise, interior is very clean. Illustrated by Walter Dower. DJ has edgewear, a few small tears. Wraparound illustration is bright and colorful on front and back panels, a little bit discolored on spine. Flap not price-clipped.
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The Old Man and the Boy Hardcover – January 1, 1964


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Holt Rinehart and Winston; Eighth Printing edition (January 1, 1964)
  • ASIN: B000S6MVP8
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (117 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,539,279 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Very well written.
Ruark2
If you liked this book there is also a great sequel called "The Old Man's Boy Grows Older" and some collections of hunting stories that are also very good.
Sammy Madison
This is the 3rd copy of this book I've had, and I've read it many times.
Skip

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Ryan McNabb on July 31, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is glimpse back into an America that is rapidly vanishing. Robert Ruark can rightly be considered the dean of serious sporting writers. Gene Hill is very good, but only wrote short pieces. Hemingway was vaster, but his angst and internal gordian knot muddy the clear waters. Ruark walks the top rail of the fence: you get the very best of it all. And nowhere does he do it better than in his two "Old Man and the Boy" collections. Others here have said it, but there are stories here that will break your heart clean in two with their aching beauty, their crystal clear images, the smells and tastes of a life spent in rural North Carolina before television. My personal favorite is "September Song", which is, along with "The Road to Tinkhamtown", one of the two or three finest pieces of American sporting literature ever put down. Any appreciation for American sporting literature must begin with Ruark, and any study of Ruark must begin with the Old Man. Without him, you'll never grasp "Horn of the Hunter", or even "Uhuru" or "Something of Value". The Old Man is the key to all the locks. Favorite quote: "Only hunting and mountain climbing are sports. The rest are just games."
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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Mike DiSalvo on January 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
Ruark's book conjures up memories of my own Old Man. The same guidelines on handling guns and how to shoot are still valid today. Some of the more important parts of this book deal with just going hunting, fishing , etc. not with the results of the day, but why we go do these things. Learn why fishing isn't about catching fish. Learn why some dogs are made to hunt and some aren't. The last chapter "All He Left Me Was The World", is not to be read by the tenderhearted. It strikes a chord with any of us who have lost our Old Man. I too went hunting the day of the Old Man's funeral, I know that's what he would have wanted, and so does Ruark.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I first read The Old Man and the Boy when I was a youngster growing up in downstate Illinois. My Paternal Grandfather and my Father were in the sporting goods business, and were devout hunters and fishermen. Everything of value that I have retained to this day I learned at the feet of my two "Old Men". While sitting by a lake with a cane pole, waiting for a bluegill to come along, or freezing in a duck blind on the Mississippi River in the cold of winter, I was passed down the rules of sportsmanship and fair play. The kind of lessons that are taught in the Old Man and the Boy are for every generation to learn and cherish; "Clean up your own mess, consider the feelings of others, have respect for the land, water, and the other creatures who share it with us, practice conservation, know when to speak, and how to listen" Robert Ruark has spun a tale of wonder and delight, I highly recommend this book to anyone who would enjoy reading a great series of outdoor adventures, in a format that never talks down to the reader, insults your intellegence, or becomes stuffy. An outstanding book!!!
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By J. Reynolds on June 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Young Robert Ruark apparently lived during the last gasps of an American continent striving to preserve its wildness, and he exploited the situation to the fullest. Springing from an environment of urban amenities, he nonetheless had access to everything wonderful that rural America could offer: abundant game, fish and fowl; wild, unpopulated woods, fields and streams; empty beaches and the great Atlantic Ocean. His forenote, "Anybody who read this will realize I had a fine time as a kid," hits the nail on the head.
I first read this book as a pre-teen, and have been envious of Ruark ever since. His fishing, hunting, camping, boating, hiking tales are the stuff of a fantastic boyhood -- and for the overwhelming majority of Americans in today's times, such adventures are found only in stories told by folks from the distant past.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
My husband received this book for a gift right after we married. I had very little understanding of a real hunter and how holidays and seasons joyfully dictated whether he would be on a dove shoot or freezing cold in a duck blind. He and I read this book countless times and always shed a few tears. Ruark's stories and the sage advise of the old man made this young bride appreciate the land and to love and respect a fine bird dog and the desire to make a bird, fish or venison dinner into a Southern culinary delight. His description of Miss Lottie and her fruitcakes and hams at Christmas are so beautifuly written, that without a doubt,you would give it all up to spend one Christmans with the boy,the old man, and Miss Lottie! A hunter's dream of a way of life.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By George G. Kiefer on December 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A craftsman, once he truly masters his craft, becomes an artist. Rauk's grandfather, his outdoor guide and teacher, was such an artist. His understanding of game, conservation, wilderness and young boys on the brink of manhood transcends a mere outdoorsman.
Great for young men and boys who love the outdoors or old men who did once.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Smallchief on December 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
"Anybody who reads this book is bound to realize that I had a real fine time as a child." That's the theme of "The Old Man and the Boy." A boy learns to hunt and fish with his grandfather in coastal North Carolina in the 1920s. The Old Man imparts salty wisdom and a respect for quail, guns, turtle eggs, whiskey, poor whites, and rural negroes while the two of them roam the woods, swamps and sounds.

I encountered "The Old Man and the Boy" as a monthly column in "Field and Stream" Magazine in the mid-1950s and it's been with me since. The book is a collection of 28 of those columns. I pick the book up every couple of years and reread one or two of the stories. It reminds me of my own rural boyhood in Oklahoma when a gun and a fishing pole were constant companions. I had a real fine time too.

The most delicious descriptions of the book are of country cooking. I can't read Robert Ruark's tales of frying ham and eggs without heading for the kitchen to rustle up a "mess" of my own. The smell of campfire coffee, swamp water, and salty brine permeates "The Old Man and the Boy."

Much is made of books like "Catcher in the Rye" which are considered "literature" because they convey the angst of growing up. I don't perceive angst as any more typical of childhood than is the euphoria of first experiencing the wonders of the outdoors. Maybe "The Old Man and the Boy" should be on the reading list of our schools.

Smallchief
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