Buy New
$6.30
Qty:1
  • List Price: $7.00
  • Save: $0.70 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Thursday, April 17? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Old Woman Who Named Things Paperback


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.30
$3.46 $1.09 $13.75

Frequently Bought Together

The Old Woman Who Named Things + When I Was Young in the Mountains (Reading Rainbow Books) + RELATIVES CAME
Price for all three: $20.58

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (August 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0152021027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0152021023
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 9.1 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,505 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The unlikely protagonist of this quirky and tenderhearted story is a little old lady with cat glasses and a beehive who might have stepped out of The Far Side. Lonely, she names inanimate objects-her car is Betsy, her bed is Roxanne. A stray dog wanders into her life but she refuses to name it; after losing many friends "she named only those things she knew she could never outlive." When the dog disappears, however, she realizes that finding him-and subsequently naming him-is worth the risk of outliving him. Brown's (Boris) hilarious, disproportionate depictions of the cowboy-booted woman and her belongings give this tale much of its bounce. Betsy the car has grinning grillwork and huge fins; Fred the chair has buttons for eyes and a rearing, pompadour-like back cushion. This sweet and silly story has solid kid appeal and the Larsonesque visuals will tickle more than a few grown-ups. Ages 4-8.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3?Having outlived all of her friends, an inventive elderly woman intends to outsmart loneliness by naming the significant inanimate objects in her life. Confident that she will never outlive any of them, she resides complacently with a sturdy armchair named Fred and a firm bed named Roxanne inside a well-built house named Franklin. One day, a stray brown puppy appears. She hesitantly offers scraps of food but no commitment of friendship. After a few months time, the persevering puppy grows up to be a shy brown dog, but the woman does not acquiesce. However, one day when the dog does not appear, she is filled with concern. After a valiant attempt to locate it on her own, she enlists the help of the local dogcatcher. The old woman then makes a quick but firm decision to provide the dog with a name, acknowledging his place in her affections. Oddly enough, she remains nameless throughout the story. Themes of resilience and acceptance help make the narrative meaningful. Brown's watercolor illustrations show the independent woman in her cozy, somewhat cluttered surroundings, and the engaging pup who is sure to win readers' hearts as he does hers. Although the premise of the story may be a bit sophisticated for younger children, the happy resolution is most satisfying. Lucky the children who meet Lucky.?Mary Margaret Pitts, Boston Public Library, Hyde Park,
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
42
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 46 customer reviews
This is a great book to read and share with children and can be used many ways in a classroom as well.
Gloria Hoyos
I love that Cynthia Rylant has elder people in her stories- people who have lived a long time, and can pass on life's lessons in an honest, heartfelt way.
arktikos
All children who have fun naming things and enjoy animal stories about pets will want to read and treasure this book.
Scot McColl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Marion VINE VOICE on June 18, 2003
Format: Paperback Amazon Verified Purchase
I bought this wonderful little book because I love Ms. Rylant's book, "Cat Heaven" and had intended to give it to my grandson, but I'm keeping it for myself I love it so much (I can read it to him when he visits!) The illustrations are awesome. I love the little old lady's outfit, complete with flowered baggy pants and pointy-toed cowboy boots. Readers from age 5 to 99 out there need this book about love, life and loss. It'll make you smile.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By DeanM on August 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
I don't know why this book didn't get more attention. If I had to choose one children's book as my favorite, this may well be it. And it's never failed me when I've read it for children either - each time, a hush comes over the room.
What's interesting to me about this book, it's one of the few children's books that don't have any 'children' characters. Basically, it's the story about a lonely woman finding a dog, but, like all great books, there's all kinds of other things put in on top of that - old age, death, the memory of good friends and the lesson that you have to be willing to risk and lose in order to love and be happy.
Cynthia Rylant has written a very special book here and I urge you to get this book. You will not be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By abigail kylie & julian on January 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have a passion for children's books - my 3 year old daughter is so indulged. I found The Old Woman who Named Things whilst browsing this Sunday afternoon and had tears well up in my eyes whilst reading it in the shop! What a perfect and so real evocation of an elderly person's fears, lonliness and subsequent eccentricities. I rushed it home to my daughter and have read it 3 times this evening. She loves it - was amused by the naming of objects - wants to do the same around our house - fell in love with the dog and was so sad for the lady when the dog became lost. She felt the old woman couldn't truly be friends with him until she "named" him. It was so nice too to have a book with an elderly "heroine". My only quibble would be that the term "outlived" is probably beyond most young children - I would have used "died" somewhere to make it clearer. I know its subtlety is lovely but I have had to stop and explain outlived each time anyway.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Richie Partington VINE VOICE on July 8, 2006
Format: Hardcover Amazon Verified Purchase
Ten years after first reading this aloud at circle time, Rylant's lovely story of the old woman who has to decide to, once more, take a chance on love and loss, has become a beloved old friend to me. Brown's quirky illustrations are quite memorable--especially the joyous spread near the end of the story in which the dog, with his tongue hanging out, happily sticks his head out the window of the old woman's car that is driving him home. Cynthia Rylant has won a Newbery for MISSING MAY, and has authored HENRY AND MUDGE, the greatest easy reader series ever published. THE OLD WOMAN WHO NAMED THINGS is absolutely right up there with the best of her work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By exmuse on June 6, 2001
Format: Paperback Amazon Verified Purchase
This is simply a beautiful book. The illustrations are marvelous - real works of art!!! Sometimes illustrations don't do justice to a storyline - but in this case it really works. The book is very emotional. I actually got choked up reading the story a couple of times to my young daughter. It's a book I never tire of reading. It's deep, philosophical and contains meaningful life lessons (ie. how to come to terms with one's death, the choices we make, whether we choose to embrace life or reject/fear it, the value we place in material things). In other words, it's a book that makes you think. Young and old would appreciate this book as a gift. It's written in a sweet, gentle voice and how Cynthia Rylant has a way with words!!! I love this book so much, I bought it for my child's teacher. Please check out this book - you won't be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on July 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
The book The Old Woman Who Name Things is a good story. I think it's good for all ages. The old lady named her bed Roxanne, her Car Betsy, her old chair Fred and her old house Franklin. She has outlived all of her friends. One day a stray dog wanders into her yard. She feeds him and tells him to go home. The dog leaves and returns every day for more to eat. Then one day the dog doesn't come. A few days go by and she doesn't see the dog. The old lady gets worried so she calls the pound and asks about him. They said they might have him.
She decides to go to see if he's there. He is, so she takes him home with her and names him Lucky. This story is funny and makes the characters seem real. Parents will want to keep reading this story over and over again to their children.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. Harrington on November 13, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book is so emotionally satisfying. Cynthia Rylant brings the universal struggle of choosing to risk love and loss to a child's level. I never tire of reading it to my daughters (ages 5 & 3). They love the book, as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Karen K. Hart VINE VOICE on April 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover Amazon Verified Purchase
I bought this book because, well, my grandma is an old woman who names things. I was really pleased with it. I didn't take to the illustrations at first, but they really grew on me; I love all the colors and details (from the car's smile to the woman's paisley pants). The story is touching and held my attention well; it really is great for children and adults alike. My parents liked it, and I hope to read it to my children someday. I'm so glad The Old Woman Who Named Things showed up in my amazon.com recommendations!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa734cc18)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?