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The One Extra tracks, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered

48 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Extra tracks, Original recording reissued, May 15, 2001
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$11.19 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by DVD-PC-GAMES and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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The One + Sleeping With The Past (Remastered)
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 15, 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Extra tracks, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Rocket
  • ASIN: B0000089F2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,841 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Michael Kerner HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on April 2, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Elton John's popularity fizzled in the late 80's, but he came back as strong as ever in the 90's. His album, The One, reflected upon many challenges Elton found himself in at that time of his life. He was recovering from drugs and alcohol, and mourned the deaths of Queen's Freddy Mercury, and Ryan White.
The songs on The One are as dynamic and energetic as you could expect from Elton. Songs like The Last Song, Runaway Train (with Eric Clapton) and Simple Life, reflect on moving on from roads that have been harshly traveled, and the rebirth of life anew. The songs also reflected Bernie Taupin, Elton's longtime collaborator. At the time, he was going through a difficult divorce. Songs like When A Woman Doesn't Want You, On Dark Street, and Understanding Women, still shows feelings of that lost love.
Although The One was originally remastered in the U.K. in 1998, its presence in America remastered is just as strong as you could expect from Elton John. It still proves that Elton John will always be The One.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By David Sigler on July 3, 2004
Format: Audio CD
With The One, Elton launched his first new collection of songs for the 1990s. With the slow down turn of his personal life coming to a halt by 1990, Elton emerged clean and sober for the first time in years. It shows in the music as well and particularly, in his voice. Confident, soulful and more mature, The One showcases Elton's vocal and piano playing once again. After the mild-mannered Sleeping With The Past, which attempted to capture the spirit of old school R&B (of which about half succeeded), The One jumps back into a more traditional mix of pop and rock.
The first song on the album, Simple Life, examines the trials and desires of getting things back in order (including personal, professional and spiritual). Did lyricist Bernie Taupin - who writes all of the words here - deliberately write this on purpose? In a way, the lyric reminds me of the storytelling he used for 1975's autobiographical Captain Fantastic release. Because he sings this song with a lot of conviction and he not just a mouth piece for Taupin this time - these lyrics are something he can relate to and more importantly, experienced. That aside, the plodding music never takes the song anywhere and once again, producer Chris Thomas never lifts the song up. The verses and chorus blend into one another without any trace of chord structure changes or rhythmic patterns to intervene.
The title track, The One, about finding personal and spiritual happiness with that special someone, ranks up there with Elton's best ballads. Lyrically, musically and vocally, this one was destined to be a smash hit from the beginning. Other key songs include the haunting "The North", about Taupin's roots, in which Elton sings: "The North was my mother, but I no longer need her, you trade your roots in the dust, for a face in the river.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S J Buck on October 16, 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is not quite 4 stars in my view, but its a better album than Elton had produced for a long time with stronger songs and arrangements than anything since "Two Low for Zero". It is still over-produced but there are hints here of the gradual return to his classic sound of the early 70's that would occur so dramatically on "Songs for the West Coast".

'Simple Life' and 'The One' are fine starters to the album. 'The One' in particular shows off Elton's melodic gift as well any track I can think of through his use of an extended chord sequence. Its sad that the track is over-produced, but this can't detract from a great melody. 'Emily' is classic Elton John. Starting with a verse that really doesn't seem to be going anywhere, but then he hooks with another of those amazing choruses. "On Dark Street" is a soulful track, which is one of the few tracks that benefits from its contemporary production. If you want a comparison with classic period its 'Philadelphia Freedom (ish)'. Eltons insistent electric Piano underpins the whole song, and a synthesised string arrangement adds to the soulful arrangement.

'The Last Song' is the last track of the album and is a great song both lyrically and melodically. Its a shame that Elton didn't do this with just Piano and Vocal as the track really doesn't need the other keyboards. However its a fine way to finsh the album.

Its really only the production and overall sound that separates this album from say 'Songs fron the West Coast'. Elton showed with this album that having recovered from the drugs and alcohol problems he could write good songs again and this is well worth getting.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John Kwok HALL OF FAME on October 22, 2006
Format: Audio CD
From 1989 through 1995, Elton John released three albums, "Sleeping With the Past", "The One", and "Made in England" which were a radical departure from his commercially-oriented 1980s albums, and they should be regarded by his fans as among his best. Of these three, "The One" may be the most impressive of them all, since he wrote spellbinding blues and country-flavored pop ballads and rock and roll anthems, which were coupled to some of Bernie Taupin's most eloquently written lyrics. Working again with producer Chris Thomas, the producer of virtually all of his albums in the previous decade, Elton discarded much of the heavily orchestrated synthesizers which were characteristic of much of his 1980s work, emphasizing instead, a fine studio session band that included long-time associate - now musical director of the Elton John Band - guitarist Davey Johnstone, Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, guitarist Adam Seymour (most recently with The Pretenders), bassist Pino Palladino (probably best known now for his recent work with The Who and John Mayer) and then relatively new band member keyboardist Guy Babylon, who had joined the Elton John Band in time for the recording session of "Sleeping With the Past". Musically, "The One" was Elton's most innovative album in the 1990s, and included not only blues and country, as well as pop and rock and roll, but also Motown/Philly Soul too. Collectively, the songs in "The One" still sound rather fresh, as if this album was released only this year, not back in 1992, constituting the John/Taupin songwriting team's best body of work until their late 2006 album "The Captain and the Kid". Without question, this album, even in its digitally remastered version (It was supervised by Elton John's original producer, Gus Dudgeon.Read more ›
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