The Ontology of Mind: Events, Processes, and States and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$42.72
Qty:1
  • List Price: $56.00
  • Save: $13.28 (24%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Ontology of Mind: Events, Processes, and States (Oxford Philosophical Monographs) Paperback – May 18, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0198250647 ISBN-10: 0198250649

Buy New
Price: $42.72
6 New from $42.72 9 Used from $39.43
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$42.72
$42.72 $39.43

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student




NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Series: Oxford Philosophical Monographs
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (May 18, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198250649
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198250647
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,798,198 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Steward's carefully constructed argument challenges the long-standing core assumptions of identity theoriests as well as the more recent assumptions of eliminativists and functionalists. Steward's text should be required reading for anyone with a serious interest in understanding the implications of assumptions that may have been taken for granted for far too long."--Choice


"Steward's carefully constructed argument challenges the long-standing core assumptions of identity theoriests as well as the more recent assumptions of eliminativists and functionalists. Steward's text should be required reading for anyone with a serious interest in understanding the implications of assumptions that may have been taken for granted for far too long."--Choice


About the Author

Helen Steward is Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Balliol College, Oxford.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Clayton Littlejohn on January 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
I'd recommend this to anyone with a serious interest in the philosophy of mind but caution that it is not the sort of thing easily digested by undergraduates. The book is divided into two parts. In Part I, Steward explains why some popular views concerning event identity prevent us from formulating a coherent version of token physicalism. She then provides us with ways of distinguishing events, states, and processes in the hopes of clarifying what is too often muddled discussion concerning the nature of the relation between the mental and the physical. She then tries to sort out the proper role for states, events, and processes within our causal ontology and provides a nice discussion concerning the distinction between causation (understood as a relation among events and perhaps substances) and causal relevance. In Part II, she explains why functionalism and eliminative materialism (in their standard formulations) run into difficulties because the arguments for such views illictly assume that there is a coherent notion of a token state that could play a certain role in causation that she has argued in Part I states could not fulfill. If she's right, much of the discussion in contemporary philosophy of mind is seriously confused. She finishes with some sketchy and speculative comments as to how we should best formulate physicalist theses (Note: she's not defending such theses, only providing us with suggestions as to how to coherently state them).

Often her arguments rest on linguistic data and if you aren't already familiar with the distinction between tense and aspect, say, this book will be a very difficult read. It is something that I feel has not received sufficient attention in the literature for two reasons.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search