Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$7.99
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Oracle Edge: How Oracle Corporation's Take No Prisoners Strategy Has Created a $8 Billion Software Juggernaut Hardcover – November, 1999

2.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, November, 1999
"Please retry"
$0.75 $0.01

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Adams Media Corporation (November 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580621651
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580621656
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,959,312 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

One of Oracle's founders and I had a good laugh over this book. The inaccuracies are amazing. About two pages in it says that Oracle was started to build a database on an IBM mainframe for the Air Force. Wrong customer, wrong computer, wrong project. It doesn't get much better later on. The author didn't bother to interview any early Oracle people except the accountant. The book says there are few nerds at Oracle, and everyone is fashionably dressed. This tells me he only met sales and marketing people, not the several thousand technicians who worked in the adjacent buildings and actually built the products. A bit later the author says that he was moved from an inexpensive motel to a fancy hotel because that's how Oracle people lived. He doesn't mention that the manager in charge of that group was fired for wasting money. I could go on, but this review must be limited.
I think the book does suggest the tone of the sales and marketing people when left on their own, but the shareholders should know that most people are modest, hardworking, normal people and that wasting money is not the corporate standard.
Comment 33 of 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
The Oracle Edge is too superficial to be of much value to all but those who want a quick excursion into the subject. You'll have to provide your own interpretations. The author doesn't provide much.
The key lessons I took away from the book are that the company succeeded by providing software benefits for large companies ahead of anyone else in the areas of compatibility across computer platforms, upgrading to new releases, adding new applications, and having maximum up-time. It appeared to have helped that its early competitors did little to respond to any challenge Oracle provided.
As to the future, it looks like Oracle's processes for improvement are not yet robust enough to take on the Microsoft hegemony in personal computers.
Fully eighty percent of the book seems to be about recruiting methods, compensation processes, expense accounts, ways of meeting with customers, and handling of new product releases that are completely unremarkable in the context of what best practice companies do. You can skip over those materials.
One thing that makes this book a little suspect is that there is primarily perspective provided about the company from the author and financial people (I couldn't tell if it was one or two in the latter case). That's a pretty thin base for a whole book about a company. Interviews with customers and competitors would have been nice.
I suspect that the next book about Oracle that someone writes will be the standard for all of us to consider. This book reminds me of The McKinsey Way, a thin abstract of the famous consulting firm's processes from someone who didn't operate at a very high level in the company.
If you don't feel you have to know about Oracle, I suggest you take a pass on this book.
Comment 15 of 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on December 29, 1999
An employee of Oracle, I was thrilled to see this book. However, the material is superficial, disappointingly low on hard fact and examples. Few takeways. Particularly disappointing is the info onthe provision of globalized products by Oracle - that this book was written by an American Marketing person is obvious.
Comment 9 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on December 18, 1999
Verified Purchase
I had great hopes when i purchased this book. Having worked at Oracle for 4 years, I know that there is much to learn from that experience. However, Stuart Read does little more than provide puffy paragraphs to surround an outline. The facts are too vague to convey real value and it left me feeling empty. It's a shame as it could have been a great book. The concept is good but the execution is poor.
Comment 8 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Oracle Edge attempts to give an insight into how Oracle built a huge organization from a tiny project started by Larry Ellison for a client. It describes how Larry focused on aggressive methods to grow the company, and the upsides and downsides of the methods used. Many incidents are described by the author, involving sales and marketing people, technical employees and senior employees of the organization. These give a good idea about the culture of the organization, and how it has evolved over the years. Some interesting aspects of the book were the aggressive sales focus, maintaining a core-group for product development, extraordinary rewards for the best employees, a rather different hiring criteria, and other mechanisms used to communicate in the organization. The book is probably not for technical reading, and may not even give a complete picture of the organization, but it gives some interesting experiences and perspective of the author about the organization, its early days, and its tremendous growth over the years.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Published in 2000, this book was in many respects already out of date. By now, more is. Much of what remains current is represented here by truisms and by gee-whiz exclamations, as for instance Read's goggling at Oracle's fitness center and cafeterias. He appears to subscribe to, and he promotes, a very unreflective adherence to Oracle business practices.
However, one must salute Read's marketing abilities, without which his book was unlikely to interest even so obscure a publisher as Adams Media Corporation. On the other hand, the book is astonishingly ill-written--Read is reported to have a degree from Harvard, but I'm waiting to see it--and his publisher evidently never even thought of editing his annoying prose.
Stay away from this book. By contrast, _The Difference Between God and Larry Ellison_ is a gem.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews