The Order War (Saga of Recluce) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.75
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Order War (Recluce series, Book 4) Mass Market Paperback – February 15, 1996


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.99 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Saga of Recluce (Book 4)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Tor (February 15, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812534042
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812534047
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 4.3 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #161,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this fourth tale set in Modesitt's universe, where good and evil, chaos and order, are in perpetual conflict, a young wizard reluctantly finds that his destiny is to strike a balance, but at considerable personal cost. Sometime well after the events in The Magic Engineer and before The Magic of Recluce, order engineer Justen, a junior in his guild, volunteers for a force sent by Recluce to aid the matriarchy of Sarronnyn, under attack by the White Wizards of Fairhaven in their move to extend the rule of chaos. The vastly outnumbered armies of order nearly succeed in holding back the conquerors, mostly due to Justen's development of chaos-destroying weapons and the efforts of his brother Gunnar, a powerful Air Wizard who marshals the weather as a formidable weapon and unleashes flash floods. But treason fells the defenders, and Justen is separated from his cohorts and ends up wandering in the deserts of Candar. Rescued by the druid Dayala, he is taken to her people in Naclos, where he learns about living in perfect harmony with nature, and about his fearsome destiny to curtail the savage war between order and chaos. Although at times his villains seem a touch unsophisticated and even simpleminded for the evil they perpetrate, Modesitt creates a deeper and more intricate world with each volume.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

When the White Wizards of Fairhaven unleash their chaos-borne powers against the forces of order while laying siege to the land of Sarronyn, the order-bound Black Wizards of Recluce enter the battle on the side of the defenders. Justen, a young Black Engineer, discovers that the only sure road to victory over chaos involves breaching the gap between chaos and order-an action both forbidden and dangerous. In this latest addition to the Recluce saga, Modesitt (The Magic Engineer, LJ 3/15/94) fills another gap in this history of a world's ongoing struggle to balance opposing forces. The author's ability to concentrate on the personal lives of the characters as well as their involvement in world-shaking decisions gives depth and believability to a unique fantasy environment. A strong choice for most fantasy collections.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

After spending years writing poetry, political speeches and analyses, as well as economic and technical reports on extraordinarily detailed and often boring subjects, I finally got around to writing my first short story, which was published in 1973. I kept submitting and occasionally having published stories until an editor indicated he'd refuse to buy any more until I wrote a novel. So I did, and it was published in 1982, and I've been writing novels -- along with a few short stories -- ever since.

If you want to know more, you can visit my website at www.lemodesittjr.com.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
9
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
5
See all 31 customer reviews
So it would seem this is a filler of details book.
Jvthree
Anyone new to the series should read them in chronological order to get the most enjoyment from the series.
Christopher
Very consistent take on magic, great characters that are easy to get behind.
Kim Horton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Ware on August 4, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This, the fourth book in the series (after THE MAGIC OF RECLUCE, TOWERS OF THE SUNSET, and THE MAGIC ENGINEER), is a vast improvement over the others. The pacing in this book was so much better. The other three had large sections in the middle where nothing really happened, at least in terms of plot progression. This book has slow areas, but they were the slow areas of mostly any other good book out there. They were used for character development rather than for philosophy, as in the first three books. In addition to the better pacing, Modesitt has cut down on the utterly confusing leaps of intuition that were a glaring mark throughout the first three books.
Modesitt's characterizations continue to be very strong here. All of the characters in his books are believable and the villains are not just some two dimensional cardboard cutout. I think the characterizations are the strongest part of Modesitt's writing. Since there's not always a lot of action, the growth of the characters is what keeps my attention in these books.
Modesitt continues to build a vivid, interesting world. I can't wait to find out what this "Legend" he keeps talking about really is. The only real shortcoming of this book is the lack of maps so I can figure out where the heck the characters are in relation to places they've been!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By sysgen on January 19, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In my opinion, a step down in the quality of the series thus far. Though fantasy, Modesitt asks his Order War readers to accept a lot. At times he justifies his main characters actions which says to me that either the story has some holes which he needs to fill quickly or the plot and his character (in this case Justen) are not developed enough to make the story unfold. I found my self thinking while I read that this doesn't quite make sense. I understand it is fantasy, but I have come to expect a certain quality from Modesitt's Recluce, as the author to this point in the series has set. I cannot elaborate further without giving away the book. With that much said, I did finish the last half of the book in a day, and as usual Modesitt delivers in the end. I found the ending to Order War excellent and up to par with the rest of the series.
Order War is about Justen, the first gray wizard. Recluce veterans will remember Justen from the first written Recluce book, "The Magic of Recluce". Order War takes place chronologically before MOR and here we get to see how Justen becomes a gray wizard. All in all a decent read for series veterans.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christopher on September 4, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
In truth most of the the books in this series have essentially the same theme. Anyone new to the series should read them in chronological order to get the most enjoyment from the series. Chrono order of all 16 current books is below.
Magi'i of Cyador
Scion of Cyador
The Fall of Angels
The Chaos Balance
Arms-Commander
The Towers of Sunset
The White Order
Colors of Chaos
The Magic Engineer
Natural Ordermage
Mage-Guard of Hamor
The Order War
Wellspring of Chaos
Ordermaster
The Magic of Recluce
The Death of Chaos

If you wish more background for the series I'd suggest
[...]

I may be a bit biased because i started reading them after "Towers of Sunset" was published in '92 and really like the depth and was hooked. I grew up reading books like Xanth, Incarnations of immortality, and Apprentice adept series by Piers Anthony and Modesitt fits in well with that particular niche of the genre.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin Thomas VINE VOICE on March 4, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I enjoyed this novel in the Recluse series because it gives further insight into the complex magical system that Modesitt has created. It is fun to see how Justen changes through the book, and to watch the relationships with his brother, and other characters evolve. The pacing was a bit slow, just as in other Modesitt novels, and at times I got tired of the myriad of details he provides. Overall, enjoyable, especially the second half.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chip Hunter VINE VOICE on October 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book brings the Rucluce Saga full circle with the introduction of Justen the Gray and the destruction of Fairhaven. I was really excited about this story because I thought that those two topics could be really great. However, I was somewhat dissapointed in many aspects of this book. I don't really know what it was, but I just wasn't able to get into this book as much as I did the last couple. Much of the book seemed to drag on with very little being accomplished, and while the action was thrilling (with Justen and Gunnar whipping the Whites, and the Whites whipping innocent people in turn) it was few and far between. I think more could have been done with the druids (I don't feel like the reader really learns much about them) and with the Black Devil (which just supplied transport for Justen to get to Fairhaven) and what was with the metal rods that Justen used to kill those last Whites??
Look, this is a good book that fits nicely into the saga, but it just didn't live up to what I was expecting. I still look forward to the next book, in which the story returns to Lerris.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By FantasyFan on May 10, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've read the first 3 books of "The Saga of Recluce", and found them bearable at best. Due to the good reviews on "The Order War", I decided to give it a try in the hopes that the series would pick up in excitement and plot development.

I can now safely say that this series is not worth continuing and has been the worst series I have ever read. In "The Order War", the main character, Justen, is almost an exact mold copy of the Black Wizards/Engineers that preceded him. He is an exceedingly simple and predictable character who talks, thinks and acts just like Lerris, Dorrin and Creslin. You can plug in any of the previous protagonists from the previous books into this new one and the story would be written in exactly the same way.

Similarly, the primary antagonists, Renwek, Zerchas and Beltar, are another set of dull, undeveloped characters who are mentioned intermittently throughout the book. Their only purpose is to discuss the obstacles they will place in the path of the hero of the book in the form of short conversations that are 1-2 pages long. They will converse amongst themselves and tell you exactly what they plan on doing to try to stop Justen. Again, there is so little character development that you can plug in any of the previous white wizards from the other Recluce books and the story would read the same.

Finally, my last issue with the book is it's lack of complexity and excitement. Modesitt likes to tell you exactly what everyone is thinking and what is going to happen. He drops extremely blatant hints about who might betray Recluce, yet no one does anything to confirm their suspicions or even to keep an eye on the person.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?