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The Orion Protocol Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; 1 edition (November 25, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380976706
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380976706
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,298,046 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In 1959, the U.S. government issued a report by the Brookings Institution, coauthored by famed anthropologist Margaret Mead, recommending that any evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence found during the exploration of our solar system be withheld from the general public-who might react badly to it. This, suggests Tigerman in his lumpy, jumpy but rarely boring first novel, was the start of a massive coverup, exposed during the first 100 days of the administration of George W. Bush's fictional successor, a former Democratic senator from Colorado. When someone inside the NASA establishment sends PBS science correspondent Angela Browning pictures of fabulous archeological ruins on Mars, pictures that seem to have come from a supposedly lost Mars probe, it sets off a series of frighteningly believable defensive maneuvers by a host of government agencies. To find out more, Browning tracks down Jake Deaver, one of the last astronauts to walk on the moon. Together, the two embark on an investigation that not only reveals the existence of extraterrestrials but also uncovers the true function of a strategic defense shield dubbed Project Orion. As the novel proceeds, chapters and sections become increasingly short and jerky, and Tigerman's usually brisk prose occasionally turns baroque: "The fact was that Mother England's runaway child was only a blink away from possessing the means for world domination on a scale only Deutschland's most infamous housepainter had ever envisioned, burning himself alive with pure methamphetamine crystal and raving in his self-made Bergtesgarden [sic] of corpses." Despite its inconsistencies, however, this is stirring speculative fiction.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

“Stirring speculative fiction.” (Publishers Weekly)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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If you liked The DaVinci Code, you will like this book.
B. Powell
The book was too short for all the characters involved and the plot suffered from lack of develpment.
Pangloss
The plot is great, while the characters are wonderfully written.
Daniel T. Ferry

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Koppel on January 4, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ever since the government became interested in the exploration and exploitation of space, there have been concerns about how to handle what might be found. Little-known and/or questionable legislation has been passed and black budgets have been funded.

When a cable science show receives a photo showing the Cydonia region of Mars (the Face and the Pyramid). Coding makes the picture look like it originated from a lost NASA Mars probe. What does it mean? Meanwhile the new President is being pressured to give the go ahead for the Orion Project that will initiate a space-based laser defense system that actually works. Why is he being pressured?

Both of the events lead characters to delve into just what is going on. From the 1958 Brookings report co written by Margaret Mead that recommends hiding all evidence of alien intelligence, to the NASA director's ability to quarantine anyone supposedly exposed to dangerous substances, to modern black budget projects and the new leaser defense system. Ultimately the two quests come together and the truth is discovered.

Like others, I was curious about some of the goings on in the book that seemed unrelated to the main story. Were they included just to show that not everything is Orion related? Or were they included as teaser threads to lead into sequels? Could this be like Robert Doherty's Area 51 series that began with a novel of suspense and coverups that was followed aby books dealing with what was uncovered in the first? We'll wait and see.

My main problem with the book was one of identity. There is so much factual and verifiable information in this book that the fantastic seems more plausible. Many historic and public figures are mentioned. But the crew of the final Apollo mission is completely changed.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on November 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The new American president is still trying to comprehend the true reason for launching Project Orion, the so called strategic defense shield. At about the same time TV hostess of PBS's award winning Science Horizon Angela Browning receives a strange package containing pictures of archeological ruins on Mars sent by the lost Mars Observer probe that vanished in 1993. Angela is stone walled by government agencies as she tries to learn the truth about the photos
Exasperated Angela turns to moon walker Jake Deaver for help. Though he would prefer to remain anonymous, Jake agrees to help the science reporter learn the truth about the alleged ruins. They soon find themselves in danger as they begin to unravel a cover-up much greater than Roswell or Spielberg imagined and the true reason for launching Project Orion.
Science fiction conspiracy buffs will have a field day with Gary Tigerman's tale that cleverly intermingles real events from the past several decades with a major effort to "protect" people from the truth. The story line jumps back forth in time and geography more often than Sam Beckett leaped yet in some weird way that augments the conspiracy theory. The action never slows down as even the afterward author's notes hook the audience into believing that the White House regardless of party affiliation knows more than they let on so that believers will think Mr. Tigerman is a brilliant reporter exposing the truth while action thriller readers will say all's "welles" that ends well whether it is radio or TV.
Harriet Klausner
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JS on May 24, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book because I am both a UFO and sci-fi fan, and love good conspiracy theories. This book did not disappoint in those departments. The story concerns a grand conspiracy that has been around since the Truman years, and has been pulling the real strings in Washington all this time. The author slowly weaves a tale that starts out a complete mystery and keeps you guessing until the end. So far, so good.

But I could only rate it three stars because of the author's political biases come through and really distract from the story.

For example, when he lists which presidents were in on the evil conspiracy, and which ones were unaware of it, of course, by coincidence, the ones "in" were all Republicans, and all the ones "out" just happen to be Democrats. He also throws in comments (really unnecessary to the plot) about how only people like Republicans are interested in wasteful programs like SDI, etc. There are many similar references sprinkled through the book, most of them unnecessary to the plot.

A book needs to have some point of view, but c'mon, the book reads like an advertisement for the Democratic Party - making the characters themselves seem terribly two-dimentional.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Josh Freeman on December 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Gary Tigerman's first novel zips along, pulling you right with it. His punchy style combines Dan Brown's "Da Vinci Code" with a little Ross MacDonald. It's loads of fun to watch as he expertly peels back the layers of this fascinating, topical onion of a story. More political than SciFi, but enough of each that those of us who enjoy both genres have plenty to keep us turning those pages. Great book. You'll have a blast.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bookreporter.com on December 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Gary Tigerman's debut science fiction novel, THE ORION PROTOCOL, is so good it should come with hot buttered popcorn.
THE ORION PROTOCOL is everything a science fiction novel should be and thensome. Tigerman's main characters, former Apollo astronauts Commander Jake Deaver and Colonel Augie Blake, nearly 30 years after NASA's final voyage to the Moon in 1973, have kept silent about their findings until journalist Angela Browning receives a mysterious computer disk from an anonymous source.
The disk reveals images of Mars believed to be taken from the Mars Observer, an actual spacecraft sent to explore the surface of the Red Planet in 1992. While NASA reported that the spacecraft, manned by scientists at Kennedy Space Center, was lost due to an explosion, Tigerman's book sheds new light on the possibility of a conspiracy by the U.S. government concerning the real story behind the lost orbital.
This fascinating novel isn't just about unrevealed findings on the Moon or top secret images taken from Mars; it is also the unveiling of Project Orion, a supposed space defense system posing as an innocuous satellite. The book speaks volumes to conspiracy theorists in terms of America's efforts from the start of NASA to do whatever it takes to shed from the public the possibility of extraterrestrial life forms inhabiting other planets, namely the Moon or Mars.
As far back as the Eisenhower administration in 1958, at the dawn of NASA, the Brookings Report, a blue-ribbon study approved by Congress and authored by Margaret Meade, stated that any type of extraterrestrial intelligence could impose chaos to the American public. At the end of the novel, Tigerman includes a note from the author about his subsequent factual findings during his research that keeps the conspiracy wheels churning.
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