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The Osage Indian Murders: The True Story of a 21-Murder Plot to Inherit the Headrights of Wealthy Osage Tribe Members 1st Edition

8 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0965917414
ISBN-10: 096591741X
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Amlex Inc; 1st edition (May 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 096591741X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0965917414
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,035,265 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 9, 1999
Format: Paperback
A pretty good book. The author had a great story to begin with....it would make an excellent motion picture. However, I thought it had a few shortcomings. The absence of an Osage perspective on the whole ordeal was a major flaw. Surely, Hogan could have found some documents from tribal members who experienced the "Reign of Terror" or interviewed the few remaining Osage members who lived through this period. Also, as a Native American, I thought the use of "Squaw" and "Squaw Man" was gratuitous and offensive. Furthermore, the jumping around from case to case was confusing at times. Nonetheless, I have recommended the book to many friends. As a person who works with the Osage Tribe, I found his account consistent with my knowledge of the "Reign of Terror" that I have accumulated through many meetings with tribal leaders and elders in Pawhuska. I was also pleased that he included an accurate, though brief, tribal history section at the beginning of the book. Furthermore, the author was successful in giving the reader a adequate sense of the setting in Osage County during the 1920s- a place replete with scoundrels, bootleggers and con men. Additionally, I was very pleased with his writing style. Often times when a "true crime" story is being told, the book is bogged down with picayune details of court proceedings. However, Hogan was able to offer a succinct, yet comprehensive account of the trial involving the Osage Indian Murders.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
The arid Oklahoma acres turned over to the Osage Indians back when whites were taking over other parts of the so-called Indian Territory, proved in the 1920's to be floating on oil. The income was split into 2,229 headrights; some of these instant millionaires found wealth hard to handle. But a far sadder consequence, as Lawrence J. Hogan reconstructs in [this book] was the arrival of white men bent on seizing the money for themselves. A favorite method was to marry an Indian widow; she and her relatives then conveniently died and the interloper inherited everything. When the tribe cried out to Washington for help, the case was assigned to... the very new Federal Bureau of Invesitigation. It took from 1923 to 1929 but bypassing the corruption and futility of local lawmen, the FBI obtained four convictions and four life sentences. The reign of terror abated and the FBI heard its first national applause. Hogan...was a three-term Congressman and then County Executive of Prince Geoges County [MD]. But first he worked 10 years for the FBI where he learned of the Oklahoma outrage. After reviewing what is known today of Osage life and beliefs, he tells a powerful story. The great open spaces have been home to people as depraved as any city folk.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By amlex@radix.net on July 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
The reader from Edmond, OK did not like this book, but apparently he is a minority of one among Osage Tribe members. The Osage Tribal museum as well as commerical establishments owned by Osages have sold thousands of copies of "The Osage Indian Murders."
He claims the book is inaccurate historically, but the book was written with access to all of the FBI's files about the case as well as historical material available at the White Hair Memorial near Fairfax, OK, the Osage Tribal museum in Pawhuska, OK, the Tulsa Public Library, the Tulsa world and other sources. The reader objected to the book stating that Baconrind "bellowed," but that is a verbatim quote from a magazine writer who personally interviewed Baconrind. Baconrind's grandson and namesake, incidentally, has bought several copies of the book. If this reader from Edmond, OK has some specifics to back up his objections about inaccuracies, the author and publisher would be pleased to have this information as is stated in the introduction to the book.
Many Osages have purchased multiple copies for relatives and friends without ever objecting to anything in the book.
The author would be pleased to personally hear from this reader if he has any specifics to back up his objections.
Amlex, Inc.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
White men marry Indian women and then kill their relatives to acquire their share in the Ossage Tribe's oil wealth. There were about two dozen murders. This was the FBI's first big case. A fascinating true crime story.
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