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The Outcast Dead (Horus Heresy) Mass Market Paperback – October 25, 2011


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The Outcast Dead (Horus Heresy) + The Age of Darkness (Horus Heresy) + Horus Heresy: Know No Fear
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Product Details

  • Series: Horus Heresy (Book 17)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Games Workshop; 1 edition (October 25, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849700877
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849700870
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #162,120 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Graham McNeill has a established a strong reputation as a fantasy and SF writer with such best-selling novels as Fulgrim, False Gods and The Ultramarines. His novel, A Thousand Sons, made The New York Times shortlist for fiction.  Additionally, his novel, Empire, has been shortlisted for The David Gemmell Legend Award.

More About the Author

Hailing from Scotland, Graham McNeill narrowly escaped a career in Surveyinh to join Games Workshop, where he worked for six years as a games developer. In addition to many novels, including False Gods, Fulgrim and Mechanicum for the prestigious Hoeus Hersey series, Graham has written a host of sf and fantasy short stories. He lives in Nottingham, UK.

Customer Reviews

I really loved the main character in this book.
Voodoodaddy
McNeill again approaches the `other folks' involved in the Horus Heresy with The Outcast Dead, the latest entry in the best selling Horus Heresy saga.
Sean Dooley
Ending was interesting, but felt a little rushed, like not all the loose ends were tied up.
Jonathan Shane Obrien

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Sean Dooley VINE VOICE on October 27, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One of the most common complaints I hear about the Horus Heresy series is that it's too Legio Astartes-centric. I can't deny that, for the majority of the Horus Heresy novels, this is true. The Horus Heresy is about the Astartes civil war and fratricide that shatters the budding Imperium. However, people that look at that aspect of the series and decide not to read are missing out on some great stories in which marines are not the focus. We saw this previously in Graham McNeill's Mechanicum, James Swallow's Nemesis, and to a great deal in Dan Abnett's Prospero Burns (while about the Space Wolves, our main protagonist is a human). McNeill again approaches the `other folks' involved in the Horus Heresy with The Outcast Dead, the latest entry in the best selling Horus Heresy saga.

The Outcast Dead is primarily the story of Kai Zulane, the astropath depicted on the cover, who has experienced severe psychic trauma as a result of the Gellar fields of his starship, the Argo, failing and loosing the terrors of the warp on its occupants. It is also the first HH novel to take place entirely on Terra. Through Kai, Roxanne Castana--another of our protagonists--and the other supporting characters, including Atharva, a Thousand Sons legionnaire and Yasu Nagasana, a `hunter', we get to see a fuller picture of Terra and the enormity of the Imperial Palace than ever before.

The novel, as with all of the Horus Hersey novels, is broken into parts. The Outcast Dead is partitioned very distinctly, the first half of the novel taking place establishing our characters and laying the grounds for the hysteria that Horus' newly discovered treachery has had on the people of the Imperial City.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Nickolas X. P. Sharps VINE VOICE on November 6, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
There are few things I look forward to more than the release of a new Horus Heresy novel. I have been following the series since its inception and despite a few flops along the way I hold nothing but love for this epic and engrossing super story arc. These novels have become the flagship of Black Library publishing and for good reason. Individually most of these books make for compelling reads but when you look at the series on a macro scale you can develop a greater appreciation. Together the books shine light on a murky part of Warhammer 40,000 lore. Together the books tell the tale of a betrayal most vile and the war that tore the greatest empire ever created apart. These books are strongest when they further the larger picture through the events of an insulated tale. Sadly The Outcast Dead is a largely irrelevant tale that is traipsing around in a part of the Horus Heresy that has already been established.

I love the concept of The Outcast Dead, I really do. The premise is basically The Dirty Dozen, with Space Marines. It is set on Terra, birthplace of humanity which we have only gotten brief glimpses of. And the best part? The main character is a human astropath, giving us a chance to look at the events of the Horus Heresy through the eyes of a mere mortal as well as giving us a look behind the mysteries of the City of Sight. So conceptually The Outcast Dead hits all the right spots. The problem is that the novel is extraneous. The novel does nothing to further our understanding of the Heresy or progress the timeline. Not only does it fail to progress the timeline but there does seem to be a clash with the pre-established course. And I could look past this if the book was exceptionally interesting or the characters were highly developed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rhymoceros on November 3, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Could have been one of my favorite Horus Heresy books in the series, but the ending just made the whole book pointless. The characters: love em'. The setting: loved it. Writing style: good to strong at times. Loved everything but the ending, I would have picked up a sequel to this book by this author in a heartbeat if it would have continued. Besides the ending, the one other thing that bothers me while I'm writing this now is the cover...could...have...been...epic.

I enjoyed the main characters immensely, the minor characters I could have done without, and I wonder why some were in it at all, they didn't advance the plot, but honestly, from the opening, I was hooked. Then the ending made its way to the back of the book and every single event of the story might as well not have happened.

Tell me if I'm wrong, give meh a new ending and I'll give it 6 stars.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By JPS TOP 1000 REVIEWER on March 15, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First posted on Amazon.co.uk on 21 November 2011

As most other reviewers, I didn't like this book. I found it disappointing, confusing and somewhat lame and I agree with many of the comments made, including the poor writing and editing.

I was (and had been for some time) expecting to read - at last - about the Emperor's and Dorn's preparations to defend Terra and fortify the solar system, the planet and the Imperial Palace. There was very little (or should I say nothing?) about this. Instead, we get "treated", once again, with the Isstvan V betrayal, as news of this event reaches Terra, and with the expedition to "purge" Prospero and bring Magnus back in chains to Terra. I was also expecting to learn more about both Terra, the Imperial Court, its government, its elites, a description of the Palace: there was nothing of the sort.

I was also confused a number of times. Here are a few examples:

What were token forces of Space Marines doing in the Palace? Where there representatives of each Legion at residence? Where they ambassadors or hostages? Can you even conceive of a Space Marine as an "ambassador"? No decent explanation is provided. In addition, they are mentioned as the "Crusading Host" without any explanation being provided as to what this refers to. Initially, there seems to be about 30 of them, of which about a dozen are captured and 7 escape. What happens to the others? Why don't they all escape?

The reasons for sending the Wolves and the Custodes to Prospero are also somewhat unclear. Granted, Magnus, by arriving at Terra to warn his father has both violated the decision made at the Council of Nikea and somewhat disrupted the Empire's communications.
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