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The Overton Window Audible – Unabridged

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Editorial Reviews

A plan to destroy America, a hundred years in the making, is about to be unleashed...can it be stopped?

There is a powerful technique called the Overton Window that can shape our lives, our laws, and our future. It works by manipulating public perception so that ideas previously thought of as radical begin to seem acceptable over time. Move the Window and you change the debate. Change the debate and you change the country.

For Noah Gardner, a 20-something public relations executive, it's safe to say that political theory is the furthest thing from his mind. Smart, single, handsome, and insulated from the world's problems by the wealth and power of his father, Noah is far more concerned about the future of his social life than the future of his country.

But all of that changes when Noah meets Molly Ross, a woman who is consumed by the knowledge that the America we know is about to be lost forever. She and her group of patriots have vowed to remember the past and fight for the future - but Noah, convinced they're just misguided conspiracy-theorists, isn't interested in lending his considerable skills to their cause.

And then the world changes.

An unprecedented attack on U.S. soil shakes the country to the core and puts into motion a frightening plan, decades in the making, to transform America and demonize all those who stand in the way. Amidst the chaos, many don't know the difference between conspiracy theory and conspiracy fact - or, more important, which side to fight for.

But for Noah, the choice is clear: Exposing the plan, and revealing the conspirators behind it, is the only way to save both the woman he loves and the individual freedoms he once took for granted.

After five back-to-back number-one New York Times best sellers, national radio and Fox News television host Glenn Beck has delivered a ripped-from-the-headlines thriller that seamlessly weaves together American history, frightening facts about our present condition, and a heart-stopping plot. The Overton Window will educate, enlighten, and, most important, entertain - with twists and revelations no one will see coming.

©2010 Glenn Beck (P)2010 Simon & Schuster

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

192 of 209 people found the following review helpful By L. Hicken on July 8, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am conservative, but not a major Glenn Beck fan. I figured the book would have a lot of conservative political doctrine in it, and it did. For about the first half of the book, I would have given it 2-3 stars. The attraction between Molly and Noah seemed a bit contrived and the plot seemed to be kind of meandering. I was worried it was going to be a weak book that was just written as a vehicle to preach politics.

However, about half way through (and I will not give away any spoilers) Beck starts to put the first half of the book together in a way that made me understand what he was doing. It really starts to get good. The last half was a complete page turner for me.

Also, make sure to read the afterward at the end of the book. It was interesting to know how much fact was in the book. He also discusses how facts can be twisted (even by conservatives). IE, not all the conservative spiels in the book are what Glenn himself believes.

Overall, I was very happy I read it.
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894 of 1,100 people found the following review helpful By Kim Albert on June 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I am writing this review, because every review on here seems to be about the author and his biases and not about the BOOK itself. Let me first say that I am an avid reader. I read everything from Stephenie Meyer to Bertrand Russell, Chuck Palahniuk to Freakonomics. I read 3-5 books per week, fiction and non-fiction alike.

I knew very little about Glenn Beck before I purchased this book. Of course I had heard his name, and that he was a radio personality, but that's about it. I read a little about him before beginning the book, learning that he is a "conservative libertarian." With that being said, it didn't really matter to me, a good book is a good book, no matter the political implications or insinuations.

About the book: The plot was weak, it could have used a lot less quoting and preaching and a lot more character development and background. I found myself being thrown into a whole lot of speeches and little narrative or story development.

The original character descriptions were good, but I found myself wanting to know more about them, who they were really, where they came from, and what they were thinking. The protagonist of this story was the only character that was explored deeper than a name, physical description, and a little about their backgrounds. I wanted to know more about them ESPECIALLY what they were thinking.

The writing was a little below average. Mr. Beck just isn't that good of a story teller, I found myself drifting through the quotes and preaching, wanting them to be over so the story could continue...which it never really did. There was never a climax in the story, and the ending left a lot to be desired.

You would have expected to learn a lot more of the elder Mr.
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46 of 55 people found the following review helpful By C. Paul on November 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Not particularly liking or disliking Mr. Beck, I took a copy of this book from a co-worker with some reluctance, and it sat on my desk for several days before a trip caused me to pick it up for airplane reading. About 25 pages into the book I was hooked and finished it in a few short days. It is a great story. It is very well written. It is thought provoking. It is full of interesting facts and observations. And contrary to expectations, it is not a bashing of Democrats or a celebration of Republicans. Yes, there are political overtones but these can be dismissed, or considered, as the reader desires since this is just a great story.
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21 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Robert C. Olson VINE VOICE on July 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
A thinking person's philosophical thriller that went flat.
Glen Beck's new literary work is a thinking person's political thriller that went flat. Not to denigrate my favorite novel of all time, but Glen Beck's Overton Window is Atlas Shrugged "extremely lite". Mr. Beck attempts to coalesce his political philosophy around the conflicted world of the protagonist Noah Gardner and his "originalist" girl friend Molly Ross. The story starts strong but soon spins out of control as Mr. Beck tries to cover too much complex political philosophy in too few pages. The basic thesis is good, self-centered naive son of tyrannical self-possessed father meets political purist young woman and falls in love. But then the story begins to fall flat, as Mr. Beck injects his political views-much of which I agree with-without proper foundation. Still I found myself ambivalent of the Overton Window. I liked the message just not so much the vehicle.

What is The Overton Window? In Mr. Beck's words, "'s a way of describing what the public is currently ready to accept on an issue, so you can decide how best to move them toward what you want." At any given moment the "window" includes a range of policies considered to be politically acceptable in the current climate of public opinion, with "acceptable" defined as something a politician can recommend without being considered too "extreme" or outside the mainstream to gain or keep public office. From this concept, Mr. Beck extrapolates his story using the age old battle of good versus evil in the political world of America today. Good being the "original intent" of the Founders, versus the bad being the current move today toward bigger, more intrusive "nanny" government. This is where Mr. Beck' story breaks down into superficiality.
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