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The Overton Window Audible – Unabridged

4.2 out of 5 stars 951 customer reviews

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By L. Hicken on July 8, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am conservative, but not a major Glenn Beck fan. I figured the book would have a lot of conservative political doctrine in it, and it did. For about the first half of the book, I would have given it 2-3 stars. The attraction between Molly and Noah seemed a bit contrived and the plot seemed to be kind of meandering. I was worried it was going to be a weak book that was just written as a vehicle to preach politics.

However, about half way through (and I will not give away any spoilers) Beck starts to put the first half of the book together in a way that made me understand what he was doing. It really starts to get good. The last half was a complete page turner for me.

Also, make sure to read the afterward at the end of the book. It was interesting to know how much fact was in the book. He also discusses how facts can be twisted (even by conservatives). IE, not all the conservative spiels in the book are what Glenn himself believes.

Overall, I was very happy I read it.
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Format: Hardcover
I am writing this review, because every review on here seems to be about the author and his biases and not about the BOOK itself. Let me first say that I am an avid reader. I read everything from Stephenie Meyer to Bertrand Russell, Chuck Palahniuk to Freakonomics. I read 3-5 books per week, fiction and non-fiction alike.

I knew very little about Glenn Beck before I purchased this book. Of course I had heard his name, and that he was a radio personality, but that's about it. I read a little about him before beginning the book, learning that he is a "conservative libertarian." With that being said, it didn't really matter to me, a good book is a good book, no matter the political implications or insinuations.

About the book: The plot was weak, it could have used a lot less quoting and preaching and a lot more character development and background. I found myself being thrown into a whole lot of speeches and little narrative or story development.

The original character descriptions were good, but I found myself wanting to know more about them, who they were really, where they came from, and what they were thinking. The protagonist of this story was the only character that was explored deeper than a name, physical description, and a little about their backgrounds. I wanted to know more about them ESPECIALLY what they were thinking.

The writing was a little below average. Mr. Beck just isn't that good of a story teller, I found myself drifting through the quotes and preaching, wanting them to be over so the story could continue...which it never really did. There was never a climax in the story, and the ending left a lot to be desired.

You would have expected to learn a lot more of the elder Mr.
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75 Comments 899 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover
Not particularly liking or disliking Mr. Beck, I took a copy of this book from a co-worker with some reluctance, and it sat on my desk for several days before a trip caused me to pick it up for airplane reading. About 25 pages into the book I was hooked and finished it in a few short days. It is a great story. It is very well written. It is thought provoking. It is full of interesting facts and observations. And contrary to expectations, it is not a bashing of Democrats or a celebration of Republicans. Yes, there are political overtones but these can be dismissed, or considered, as the reader desires since this is just a great story.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am not an avid reader of novels. This is the first one that I've read in several years, actually. (I'm more of a nonfiction guy, personally.) Nonetheless, after reading Glenn Beck's nonfiction Control, I was excited to go back and try out the Overton Window, which I knew had been out for awhile. For so long, in fact, that at the time I started it Glenn was busy promoting its sequel, Eye of Moloch, on radio.

Based on the striking cover alone, I was expecting it to be about a big-government dystopia. In actuality, it is about the run up to the same. If you're a fan of Glenn's, that sounds like a good story in theory.

In practice, though, I'm sorry to admit that Glenn's (or the author(s) ghosting as Glenn) narrative style fails to engage. Specifically, the mechanics of "show, don't tell" are wontonly discarded. Large portions of this book consist of characters giving speeches. Soliloquies, really. The villain rants about his philosophy at length in his board room to a captive audience. The protagonist and his newfound friends deliver long speeches about their own philosophies at a rally, literally on stage. It's painful to be reading a story while actively cringing at how hamhanded an approach the author is taking in using these cheap shortcuts. It's a political story that wants to have big ideas, true, but it still needs to function foremost as a story.

My other gripe is the romance that develops between the protagonist and the opinionated constituationalist he falls for. While there is a twist to this subplot, the mushiness that the writer employs in describing their relationship is cliche.

The book does have something to recommend it, though.
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