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The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works 2nd Edition Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1344 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA; 2nd edition (August 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199267170
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199267170
  • Product Dimensions: 3.7 x 2.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (415 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #16,275 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"State-of-the-art scholarship...has come to stand as the edition of record of Shakespeare's poems and plays."--San Diego Union-Tribune


"Includes stage directions, introductions, and a trove of other scholarly goodies. A beauty."--Library Journal (starred review)


About the Author


Stanley Wells is Emeritus Professor of Shakespeare Studies at the University of Birmingham, the Chairman of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and Vice-Chairman of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre. Gary Taylor is Professor in the English Department at the University of Alabama. John Jowett is Associate General Editor of the Oxford Collected Works of Thomas Middleton and co-author of Shakespeare Reshaped 1606-23. William Montgomery works for the Guardian newspaper.

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Customer Reviews

This version boasts an active table of contents and works great.
Matthew da Silva
David Bevington gives us a well-researched and useful edition of William Shakespeare's complete works.
Adam Shah
No way to figure out what play you are reading without going back to start of the play.
Gregory Mack

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

199 of 201 people found the following review helpful By Charles S. Houser VINE VOICE on April 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Perhaps, like me, you have held on to the Complete Works of William Shakespeare you've had since college and are wondering if the world really needs yet another edition of the Bard's complete output. Well, the Modern Library edition of the Royal Shakespeare Company's Shakespeare has a lot to recommend it. The text is beautifully set in single column format, making it easier for actors and those who wish to read the text aloud to scan the poetic lines and to distinguish between poetry and prose. Jonathan Bates's General Introduction is comprehensive, engaging, and lively. As with the introductions to the individual plays, Bates gives special attention to the performance traditions from which these plays emerged as well as those which would shape their interpretation over the centuries. This concern for performance issues is also addressed in the "Key Facts" boxes that follow every play introduction. Here the editors summarize the plot, identify the major parts (with percentage of lines and number of speeches assigned to each character, etc.), take a stab at identifying a dates of composition and first performance, and discuss the plays' sources and state of the texts available. There are ample, but not an overwhelming number of footnotes. And these notes, Bates assures us, do not shy away from discussion of Shakespeare's bawdier puns (something that may not be true of your old college textbook). Another real plus is the inclusion of a fragmentary scene from "Sir Thomas More" based on the only manuscript known to be in Shakespeare's own hand.

But the best reason to buy the RSC Shakespeare is because the editors have gone to great lengths to preserve the First Folio (1623) edition of Shakespeare.
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223 of 230 people found the following review helpful By tepi on July 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE. Updated Fourth Edition. Edited by David Bevington. 2000 pp. New York : Longman, 1997. ISBN 0-321-01254-2 (hbk.)
As complete Shakespeares go, the Bevington would seem have everything. Its book-length Introduction covers Life in Shakespeare's England; The Drama Before Shakespeare; London Theaters and Dramatic Companies; Shakespeare's Life and Work; Shakespeare's Language : His Development as Poet and Dramatist; Edition and Editors of Shakespeare; Shakespeare Criticism.
The texts follow in groups : Comedies; Histories; Tragedies; Romances (including 'The Two Noble Kinsmen'); Poems. Each play is given a separate Introduction adequate to the needs of a beginner, and the excellent and helpful brief notes at the bottom of each page, besides explaining individual words and lines, provide stage directions to help readers visualize the plays.
One extremely useful feature of the layout is that instead of being given the usual style of line numbering - 10, 20, 30, etc. - numbers occur _only_ at the end of lines which have been given footnotes - e.g., 9, 12, 16, 18, 32. Why no-one seems to have thought of doing this before I don't know, but it's a wonderful innovation that does away entirely with the tedious and time-wasting hassle of line counting, and the equally time-wasting frustration of searching through footnotes only to find that no note exists. If the line has a note you will know at once, and the notes are easy for the eye to locate as the keywords preceeding notes are in bold type.
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99 of 99 people found the following review helpful By James M. Rawley on June 14, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
At the price of nearly $30, the Kindle Oxford Complete Shakespeare is a bad bargain.

Another reviewer says that many of the lines end with line-numbers, and that these numbers are not in the right hand margin, but right after the last word in the lines, which is confusing and annoying. Then the reviewer takes it back and says he was mistaken. He wasn't. He got it right, except that there are line numbers only now and then, here and there, which means you can't even count on finding the line numbers when you need them, but continue to have all the annoyance of having to disregard them at line ends when they DO show up.

It is true also that there are no reverse accent marks (the sign \ over an "-ed" ending) to indicate when "-ed" endings are pronounced to rhyme with "head." Those marks ARE in the Oxford printed text; in the Kindle version, you can't tell the difference between, say, "inform'd" and "informed," since both are printed the second way and the mark Oxford uses to distinguish them is in the book, but not in the Kindle version.

There are also passages where verse is set as prose.

Overall, this edition is better than the complete editions you can get here for a dollar or so, but paying two thousand eight hundred percent more for a couple fewer errors probably won't appeal to many readers.

Some day the major companies will develop enough respect for the Kindle that they'll do serious proofreading of their Kindle versions. In the meantime, I figure the price alone will result in an effective boycott of this edition from Kindle customers. It certainly should.

P. S. I just downloaded the Tom Corbett Space Cadet series for something like three bucks, and I read the first volume. It was pristine: completely typo free. Somebody worked hard proofreading these boys' stories from the fifties; nobody has done half as much work on the Oxford Shakespeare.
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