PTSD Breakthrough and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $21.99
  • Save: $5.58 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The PTSD Breakthrough: Th... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: No writing or highlighting! Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The PTSD Breakthrough: The Revolutionary, Science-Based Compass RESET Program Hardcover – September 1, 2010


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.41
$8.90 $3.14
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$49.98

Gorgeous for Good by Sophie Uliano
Gorgeous for Good by Sophie Uliano
Check out these new and notable beauty, grooming & style books. | See all
$16.41 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The PTSD Breakthrough: The Revolutionary, Science-Based Compass RESET Program + Retraining the Brain: A 45-Day Plan to Conquer Stress and Anxiety
Price for both: $30.29

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 70%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks; 1 edition (September 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402243510
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402243516
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #69,100 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"PTSD is not just a problem for our soldiers... It can truly happen to anyone," suggests Psychologist Lawlis (Retraining the Brain) in his slim volume on self-healing. After defining PTSD and presenting illustrative case studies, Lawlis discusses current treatments and consequences. Basing suggestions on the concept that PTSD results from an injury to the brain, he delves into six treatment steps, beginning with healing the brain with a hyperbaric chamber, sleep, and stress management. For detoxification, he suggests certain whole foods and supplements. The PTSD sufferer can, Lawlis believes, regain control over brain processes through breathing exercises and mental activities like games; release fear and rage through biofeedback and aromatherapy; and create a sense of connection through a new beginning and reentry to their community. Containing a number of quizzes to aid in self-diagnosis, exercises to do alone or in teams, a brief workbook, and a mindfulness-based stress reduction script, The PTSD Breakthrough will be of interest to the PTSD sufferer who is seeking a non-pharmaceutical path to recovery. Readers who rely on medically-oriented self help guides as a starting place for further research, however, will be disappointed by the lack of references here (surprising for a method that claims a basis in science). (Oct.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Dr. Frank Lawlis is a renowned psychologist, researcher, and counselor with more than thirty-five years' experience, and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Lawlis is the cofounder of the Lawlis Peavey Psychoneuroplasticity (PNP) Center and is the chief content advisor for the Dr. Phil show and The Doctors.

Customer Reviews

It should help anyone dealing with the problem of PTSD.
Linda Lee Napps
Excellent read for anyone who has ever been traumatized or wants to understand someone who has been.
vagcharley
This book is written in a very simple manner, and with wisdom and insight.
Laurel Riverside

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Andy O'Hara on May 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is quack medicine at its worst--from the "chief content advisor" for Dr. Phil (who associates PTSD with violence and recently called veterans with PTSD, "Monsters").

Forget about medications and psychotherapy, says the author. These are "old practices." He, of course, has the NEW answers, and what are they? First, we need to cleanse the toxins from the brain (sound just like a Sunday morning infomercial?) and get rid of the "parasites" in your intestines. Next is "positive thinking," "power breathing," "exposure to blue light," and "chewing gum." Herbs and vitamins--he lists them all, from ginseng to Rhodiola ("a Siberian herb that soldiers have used for stamina").

Not enough? Oh, Dr. Lawlis has a machine, too. It's his "Bioacoustical Utilization Device," which he claims shuts down frequencies that your brain has been using "inappropriately" and resets them to a "lower one." If that don't work, put on your 'jammies and hop into his hyperbaric chamber for some sleep, during which your immune system will stimulate internal healing.

Feel better? As a PTSD sufferer, it alarms me to see this kind of information disseminated to others who need help. "Pop medicine," of course, is a big seller--it has kept Dr. Phil and Dr. Lawlis in business. I pray that those of you who also fight this disorder seek competent medical advice, medications as needed (there are many, now, and new improved ones coming out every day) and good therapy to help you through the tough times.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
89 of 101 people found the following review helpful By Desiree Troy on February 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I would like to start out with explaining that I am not a psychologist or even a student in the field... yet. However, I have suffered from PTSD since I was 14 years old and am currently doing independent research on various treatment methods of PTSD and many types of trauma in the hopes of one day earning my degree in psychology. That being said, I must also admit that I am not a fan of Dr. Phil McGraw, nor do I have any sort of appreciation or respect for his methods. The very fact that the author of this book, Dr. Frank Lawlis, works as an adviser on Dr. Phil's show, is cause enough for skepticism.

My biggest complaint about this book is how Lawlis does not interject with any sources or use names of case studies or even state any data. How does he back-up his methods? By merely stating that it "has been proven by science". Okay then... Quite bluntly, if someone who is a doctor is not able to provide source material and statistical information in his text at all I have extreme suspicions about his reasons for writing the book and his experience on the subject. (There is a resource section in the back of the book, but, again, there's no mention of these resources or data in the text itself.)

My second complaint is that this book does not read at all as if it were written to treat PTSD. The biggest points he makes is that someone who suffers from PTSD needs plenty of sleep, fresh air, and a healthy, vitamin-enriched diet. A wee bit obvious, don't you think? The introductory chapters are nothing more than overly informed methods of treating anxiety, nightmares, and stress.
Read more ›
18 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Patrick S. Crouch on March 2, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book should be titled "Buy the device I invented". It pushes a device called the BAUD that, while FDA approved, does not have any testing behind it. Did I mention that it was also "invented" by the author? Being a sufferer of PTSD, having been through therapy for many years, a veteran, and also being a psychology student pursuing a graduate degree, I find this book to be offensive and dangerous. There is no magic bullet to cure PTSD as this book seems to be pushing, and yes I read it cover to cover. Do your research before buying this quack's book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Laurel Riverside on May 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am all too familiar with the nightmare of PTSD. When I happened to see this book on display at a local library, I decided to look into it, despite its mentioning Dr. Phil on the cover (which would not be a selling point with me). This book is written in a very simple manner, and with wisdom and insight. As I read the first chapter, I said, 'Here at last is someone who understands something about this illness.' Psychotherapy is not generally successful as a front line approach to this illness because, as Dr. Lawlis points out, the brain of a person suffering from PTSD is not working in its normal mode, biologically. The first thing to do is take steps to re-establish normal brain function, and he makes recommendations for how to do this. I think many PTSD sufferers could find this book helpful, and also experience the uplift that comes simply from encountering an author who understands so well some of the basic realities of the problem. I was also moved by Dr. Lawlis' obvious caring for the plight of our poor service personnel who have endured such traumatizing experiences. I say more power to him. I'm very glad I read this book.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By BEKKYB2003 on January 2, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've not finished college but this book is very predictable with the exception that Dr. Lawless believes ptsd comes from some kind of physical head injury- which, with people who've been to war in the past 10 years possibly might. I just don't get his point. This "breakthrough" he speaks of is kind of pointless since most people get ptsd from emotional trauma. i would know.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.