Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Paper Paperback – January 21, 1989


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.98 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 799 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage Books ed edition (January 21, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394755650
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394755656
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,607,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Since its mid-Sixties death, the Herald Tribune has grown in legend as the newspaperman's newspaper. This lovingly detailed valentine to its memory is written by a former reporter for the paper, who says that every time a newspaper dies, "the country moves a little closer to authoritarianism . . . and when a great one goes, . . .history is denied a devoted witness." A typical journalism history of a single paper, however good, doesn't quite make that point. Kluger's Simple Justice (1976) , which chronicled the judicial drive to end segregated public schools, grew in stature as the detail accrued; here the detail simply buries the import of the story. Still, while this may not be the grand social commentary Kluger would have liked, it is a splendidly told story of a newspaper. Dan Levinson, English & History Depts., Thayer Acad., Braintree, Mass.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bomojaz on March 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This excellent book portrays the life and death of the New York Herald Tribune. The Herald began in 1835, founded by James Gordon Bennett, a leading paper of the yellow journalism school. The Tribune, a powerful and highly literate Republican paper, was founded by Horace Greeley in 1841. The two papers combined in 1924, and from that time on, until its demise in 1966, was one of the most important newspapers in the country; many would say the best paper ever. After WW II the paper got mired in financial straits; a failure to expand in the booming NY suburbs or to be technologically innovative kept circulation lowest among NY dailys in the 1950s. The union strike in 1964 was the paper's death knell. Kluger leaves few stones unturned in recounting the paper's history; I personally wanted more on the paper's last decade or two. But at 800 pages, I can't really complain. Monumental.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By R. Grimsley on December 12, 1998
Format: Hardcover
A superlative and engrossing history of the New York Herald, the New York Tribune, the merged Herald - Tribune, and the rest of the New York newspaper scene from the mid 1800's to the 1960's. Fans of journalism history will love it. The author shows a slight liberal bias in his choice of adjectives but this is a minor blemish.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Journalista on April 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A bit daunting in it's girth at over 800 pages, but well worth the journey. Persevere through the first chapters; it picks up steam as you enter and careen through the 20th century. Nearing the end of the book, you may experience some of the anguish Trib staffers and owner Jock Whitney felt as they watched the paper's demise. Kluger was the right person for the job in documenting the Trib's long and colorful life. His writing is entertaining, factual and witty...valuable to anyone "connected to" or "interested in" the profession. Poignant to read in 2009 as we witness the very disappearance of print media and the large "dailies".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. F Fulbright on April 14, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I'll admit upfront I have a personal stake in this review. My father, Freeman Fulbright, was executive editor of the Trib under John Denson from 1961 to 1962.

Kluger seems to have an axe to grind against Denson and my father, and superficializes their contributions to the paper. They revitalized not just its graphic look, as Kluger admits, but also its editorial content. For this, Kluger dismisses my father as, "Tall, dapper Freeman Fulbright, with Clark Kent good looks and the toothpaste-ad smile", whose "primary duty, in the view of city-room veterans, was to hold John's coat for him,", and when Denson left, Fulbright was "the only one of the four executive editors to fall devotedly on his sword".

I can tell you that for the 16 years after my father left the Trib, up until his death in 1978, every six months or so he'd get a call at night from one former Trib man or another who was down on his luck. Without hesitation, my father would pull $50 or $100 out of his wallet, take the elevator downstairs in the apartment building in which we lived, and give it to his former colleague, no questions asked. He never got any of that money back, and he died with significant debts of his own.

But don't take it from me. An alternative view of Freeman Fulbright's talents was written by William Randolph Hearst, Jr., who wrote, "Editors like Milt Kaplan, Phil Reed, Paul Allerup, Freeman Fulbright, and others took second place to no one in the business," in his book, The Hearsts: Father and Son, page 301, 1991.

I don't know the cause of Kluger's animus toward and resentment of Denson and Fulbright, but it doesn't reflect the feelings and opinions of the real newspapermen who wrote for a living.

I tried to contact Kluger to discuss this with him directly, but he never responded.

I hope he wasn't one of the "old Trib men" to whom my father gave money.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again