Qty:1
  • List Price: $35.00
  • Save: $8.63 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Paris Neighborhood Co... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by CyberWares
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Former library book. Has a library bar code on front (marked out with marker), and a number sticker on the spine. Has library sticker on last page and damage on inside cover where RFID sticker was removed. Dust jacket has a protective plastic cover over it. There are some black marks on the 3rd/4th pages, and on the index pages, I believe they were marks from a mishap with the library return conveyer belt . Coking pages are in good condition with no marks.
Trade in your item
Get a $0.47
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Paris Neighborhood Cookbook: Danyel Couet's Guide to the City's Ethnic Cuisines (Cookbooks) Hardcover – September 1, 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$26.37
$24.08 $15.00

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New and Popular Cookbooks for Fall
Get inspired with new and popular cookbooks and other food-related titles in Fall into Cooking.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 262 pages
  • Publisher: Interlink Books (September 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566567238
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566567237
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,847,181 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Veteran restaurateur Couet and food photographer David Loftus team for a tour-in-recipes of the City of Light, its neighborhoods, and all the culinary nooks and crannies they hide. Couet acknowledges the quaint bistros and brasseries indelibly linked to the city, providing classics like Pommes Frites, Quiche Lorraine and an easy but luscious appetizer of baked goat cheese and honey. Couet argues that genuine Paris comes through in the city's many ethnic neighborhoods. The spicy lamb sausage called Merguez takes home cooks to the city's Arab Quarter; a simple but exotic salad of pineapple, coconut and pomegranate spiked with lime juice and a habanero chile transports readers to Paris' African neighborhood; and the Asian Quarter can be sampled in a crisp Green Tea and Cilantro Martini. Loftus expertly supplements Couet's rustic dishes with color and black and white photos. For many, the culinary cornerstone of the book will be Couet's take on Parisian markets and street food, in which he offers tips on creating a menu for an impromptu picnic: a trio of marinated olives, pickled sardines, wine-cooked artichokes and stuffed camembert among them. Readers who have never set foot in the French capitol will feel like they've just returned home after taking in this multifaceted cookbook.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Paris , like all great metropolises, is a city of neighborhoods where newly arrived immigrants congregate together to preserve native traditions and establish systems of support within alien cultures. Within many of Paris’ fabled arrondissements, enclaves of distinctly non-French cooking hold sway. Couet has collected typical ethnic recipes from these local markets, cafés, and restaurants. From the Marais, centuries-old host to a sizable Jewish community, come carrot kugel and potato blini. The Fifth Arrondissement’s Greeks prepare fried squid. The Avenue d’Ivry is noted for its Vietnamese spring rolls. The Arab community near the Barbès Metro stop offers duck tagine. East Africans roast chicken rubbed with exotic spices, but the cooking methodology is still verifiably French. Couet also includes examples of provincial French cooking from some of the city’s bistros and brasseries. The book brims with photographs of food and of Paris’ streets and parks. --Mark Knoblauch

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Foodie on March 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Let me start off by stating that I'd seen this book at a local bookstore, and the recipes inside immediately captured my interest. Returning home, I decided to check Amazon for a better price (of course), and to see what others have thought of it. After reading the one previous negative review, I decided to purchase the book anyway, because I simply feel that the recipes are worth having.

The first thing I cooked from the book was an hors d'oeuvre in the "Bistro Food" chapter: "Chévre Chaud," which is a sliced baquette topped with a bit of goat cheese, baked, and then you pour a fantastic mixture that includes tarragon, parsley, and basil mixed with orange blossom honey on top of each. Needless to say, my dinner guests weren't complaining. In fact, they wanted to go back and polish them off after dinner!

So, last night I decided to try the "Flétan Aux 'Epices" (Spiced Fish), in which I cooked sea bass with a spice dry-rub comprised of fennel seeds, black mustard seeds, cumin, ginger, cinnamon, and tumeric. After frying the fish in a bit of olive oil on each side, the sauce is a strained mixture of jalapeno pepper, cilantro, butter, and orange juice. Again, the guests loved it; and I am quite pleased with my new cookbook.

To sum things up, I haven't cooked a lot from the Paris Neighborhood Cookbook yet, but nearly every recipe seems to suit my tastes, and I trust the instincts of author/chef Daniel Couet based upon what I like to cook as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Old Saratoga Books on March 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is such a well-designed cookbook, as stylish as the author's home
city of Paris itself. The many color photographs by David Loftus
transport the reader to each of the eight different ethnic
neighborhoods described in the book and effectively give the flavor of
the featured recipes. It is a cookbook, a memoir and a travel book
all in one and the publishers did a magnificent job in designing the
book so that the armchair tour of these Parisian neighborhoods flows
seamlessly. One gets a taste of the Greek, Arab, Jewish, African,
Indian, and Asian quarters, as well as a sampling of bistro cooking
and meals grabbed outdoors at specialty markets and from street
vendors.

This book would be a fine working cookbook for the home cook and
professional chef alike. The recipes do not sound impossibly
difficult nor are the ingredients too obscure or expensive. The heft
of the book (265 pages) is just right for propping open on a kitchen
counter or curling around in a comfortable chair for recreational
reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tuna Bones on November 1, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a little more than just a cookbook it also offers information on food culture and Parisian neighborhood spots and ethnic cuisine. A nice read not just to cook from. Recipes are from various establishments and all very nice. I should stress that this book is much broader than just French cuisine. It is also multinational ex-pats that now reside in Paris. Nothing too complicated or unapproachable, everything looks and is yummy. Some sexy food porn pictures too. If you want something a little different this is a pretty good one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. J. Collins on January 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I returned the book because it ended up not what I thought it was going to be. Turns out it is a walking tour through ethnic Paris neighborhoods getting recipes from the various countries that these neighborhoods were settled by.
In essence eating North African, Chinese, Vietnamese, Indian, etc. in Paris. Anecdotes are good just not quite the cookbook I was hoping for.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again