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The Park Service: Book One of The Park Service Trilogy (Volume 1) Paperback – October 11, 2012


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The Park Service: Book One of The Park Service Trilogy (Volume 1) + Isle of Man: Book Two of The Park Service Trilogy (Volume 2) + State of Nature: Book Three of The Park Service Trilogy (Volume 3)
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Product Details

  • Series: The Park Service Trilogy
  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Birch Paper Press (October 11, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0988348209
  • ISBN-13: 978-0988348202
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,053 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #461,804 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ryan Winfield is the New York Times bestselling author of Jane's MelodySouth of Bixby Bridge, and The Park Service trilogy. He lives in Seattle. To connect with Ryan, visit him at Facebook.com/RyanWinfield.

More About the Author

Hi, I'm Ryan Winfield. I'm a 39-year-old writer living in Seattle. Author of the New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal Bestseller "Jane's Melody: A Novel", "South of Bixby Bridge", and "The Park Service Trilogy". I hope you enjoy my books and I'd love to hear from you at facebook.com/ryanwinfield.

I've been asked why I write. I write because I remember.

I remember waking up to snow. Great buckets of it poured from the gray skies and blanketing everything in quiet white. I remember racing to dress, struggling with my boots. "Here, don't forget your mittens." I remember the soft thump of that first footstep in the cold and virgin powder, the tracks looking back, foghorns blowing on the mist-covered bay. I feel the canvas paper bag cutting into my shoulders, the weight of Sunday's headlines heavy on my mind. I see the trees bowed with armloads of white, as if to curtsey my passing. I remember rubber bands and ink stained hands. A car spun sideways in a ditch. Always a car. Then barking dogs, a distant chainsaw. Freckles throwing fastballs that hurt for the cold of them on my neck. I remember snowmen, and igloos, and icy trails through the white and wondrous woods. And I remember sweet Mrs. Johnson waiting at her door. The smell of Avon powder, her thin smile, an envelope pressed into my palm--ten dollars and a peppermint candy cane thank you. Evening now. I remember running downtown--Salvation Army bells, white lights strung in sidewalk trees, bundled shoppers bent against the wind. I remember the heavy door, the warmth, the wood. The bookstore! Smells of paper and leather and ink. Walls of worlds bound and waiting for me to read.

Nothing has affected me as much as reading has. Dickens, Tolkien, and Lewis raised me. And while I've walked through my own hell, made my own mistakes, and found my own redemption, always there have been books. Books to help me escape, books to teach me when to stay and fight, books to help me see where I've been wrong and where I've been right.

I write because I remember. And I write because I still dream.

Customer Reviews

I look forward to reading the next books.
Michelle Reading
The character development is very well done and really I think the plot moved along a really nice pace all through the story.
Shelly329
The characters really stood out and the story makes you want to know what will come next...
Luci

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

154 of 170 people found the following review helpful By Robin Landry TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 18, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Having read Ryan Winfield's debut novel, South of Bixby Bridge, I wondered what he'd write about next. I loved Bixby Bridge, but I was surprised that The Park Service was in such a totally different genre. Bixby Bridge is a very adult novel, while The Park Service is geared towards teen readers in the same way Harry Potter and the Hunger Games are for kids. Park Service has young people as its main characters, but the dilemmas the young people face are very adult.

The main character is Aubrey Van Houten, named for his mother who died before Aubrey could know her. Aubrey lives with his father, in a 5 story underground community, miles beneath the ground of what was once New Mexico. Everyone lives underground because of the war that was fought 900 years ago where everything on the surface was destroyed. Mankind now hangs by a thread, existing underground, living in cramped quarters, only reading about the beautiful earth that once was in books.

The story joins Aubrey at age 15, just days before the test he will take to determine what level he'll spend the rest of his life living and working on. Aubrey's father is 35, the cut-off age in Holocene II, and is now ready to join his wife in the Eden promised everyone when they die. Eden is a virtual world where you can live out eternity doing anything you wish and with with your loved ones who've passed on before you.

I can't say any more about the plot, other than to say it's very exciting, and unexpected. Park Service gives us a chance to examine who were are as a species, and whether the world really would be a better place without us. Like the Hunger Games, Winfield challenges our sacred beliefs about ourselves.
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55 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Shelly329 on October 16, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
You don't get many YA books that are written from the by a man and from a male first person POV, and I love that about this book. I think that it was a refreshing change from so many YA books being told from the female POV.

The world that Mr. Winfield creates here is very well thought out and perfectly captured down to the last detail. This story takes place in a post-apocalyptic world nearly 900 years from present day. Aubrey is a young man on the verge of truly becoming a man. Little does he know how much his life is going to change. He is faced with challenges that will shape him into the man who will hopefully be able to change the world he knows for the better. Early on he meets Jimmy and forges a friendship with him that is stronger than any other relationship he has had previously. Then Hannah enters the picture rounding them out to a trio on a mission to save their world and hopefully humankind along with it.

It's so hard to do this review without posting spoilers so I am going to have to keep my comments to a minimum as far as the plot is concerned. Suffice it to say, I really enjoyed the book. The character development is very well done and really I think the plot moved along a really nice pace all through the story. Mr. Winfield is excellent with description and didn't let us down with this book.

The only thing I had a problem with, and it's really tiny, is that suddenly about 1/2 way through the book Jimmy starts cursing and he only does it a couple of times, but it seemed unnecessary and kind of out of the blue. Other than those couple of words, one use of the F word, this is a really clean YA book.
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83 of 108 people found the following review helpful By N. Cousino VINE VOICE on October 15, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Ryan Winfield follows up his first novel South of Bixby Bridge with The Park Service, the first in a trilogy that is sure to become popular amongst fans of young-adult fiction.

Reminiscent of other young-adult fiction series novels such as Divergent and Delerium, The Park Service connects you with characters who immediately catch your interest and keep you suspended as they endevor to work their way through multiple plot twists. With a bit of romance and plenty of suspense, this novel keeps you turning the pages to the very end, and eager for the next book in the trilogy.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Lardeelion on June 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mild Spoilers...

I realize I'm in the minority here, and it may be because I'm sensitive and because I went to school to obtain a degree in Environmental Science that this book bothered me. It's a very interesting concept, and a good one. But we are awash in youth dystopian fiction right now, and this is yet another example that it's everywhere.

The general scenario presented is all-too-probable. The earth was trashed. It's believable and it's disturbing because it's in the distinct realm of possibility. I found the revelations about the "afterlife" in Eden to be very, very disturbing, and that's not a reflection on the author, but on myself, I suppose. It just bothered me and I had to put the book away for a while. Also, the relationship between Hannah and Aubrey developed mighty quickly and without much substance.

I did like the book but I didn't enjoy it. If you're a worrywort about our children's future on this planet, this book will make it worse. Perhaps that's why it didn't appeal to me as much as to everyone else.
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