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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on December 12, 1999
Sure, it's been panned by those who call themselves "rock experts" and, yes, only David Cassidy and Shirley Jones ever performed on any of the Partridges' recordings. But who cares if the music was performed by studio musicians? Sure, it isn't comparable to a Jimi Hendrix for instance (who by the way toured with the Monkees before hitting it big). But, it was still standout music for its genre! Very pleasant and singable songs, the Partridge Family was music any generation could enjoy. So enough already from those who are too snobby to admit they love these songs. Have the courage to buy what you like and pick up a copy of this CD. I'll bet you'll be hooked.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on January 20, 2000
Tired, as he may have been, of being typecast as a teen idol, David Cassidy certainly has nothing to be ashamed of within this collection. Partridge Family devotees now pushing 40 will find revisiting these memories, on CD, not only entertaining, but also a true revelation in just how meticulously these songs were crafted and orchestrated; plus, you'll kick yourself for having been too young, back then, to really appreciate a 20-year-old David Cassidy's maturity of vocal phrasing. For the yet uninitiated, know that the elements that make pop music fun, exciting, or tender, are all here -- the bubbling enthusiasm of "I Think I Love You," the thrilling momentum of "I Woke Up in Love This Morning," the driving rhythm of "I Can Feel Your Heartbeat," the sensitivity of "Point Me in the Direction of Albuquerque" and "I'll Meet You Halfway" -- each song in the collection reveals some gem of an idea. Not to be left uncredited are the stellar studio musicians and backup singers who helped to create the Partridge sound, as well as producer, Wes Farrell's, expert guidance. But, ultimately, it's Cassidy's star that shines here, and you need only listen to the few tracks that were developed without him (on the premier Partridge album, not on this disc) to recognize that he's the reason for the continued and growing interest in the Partridge catalog. Now, if only the label could develop a packaging concept that better represents the quality of the music!
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on November 27, 1999
The Partridge Family albums contain some of the finest performances, compositions, and production the music industry has ever seen.
Unfortunately, this compilation - like most compilations of Partridge Family music - do not do the material justice.
It is a paradox that the songs from this band - which was basically a top 40 singles band - sound better on their respective albums than cut and pasted onto "best of" albums like this one.*
Personally, I find the most puzzling aspect of this album is the inclusion of songs that David Cassidy did as a solo artist NOT under the Partridge Family banner. While the sound is similar, it is definitely NOT the same - and by golly David Cassidy was NOT the Partridge Family! Sorry girls!
Further, the choice of songs is odd. These songs were not necessisarly the BEST songs from the PF albums, neither are they the best sellers.
On an "up" note, the liner notes written by Danny Bonaduce are great fun. Do they make up for the rest of this disappointing album? In my opinion, no.
Personally, I would encourage you to skip this album and simply purchase each of the PF albums. Start with "Sound Magazine" then to "Up To Date" then to "The Partridge Family Album". After that you can purchase the other albums in whatever order suits you. Just buy them all - you won't want to miss a one!
This way you will end up a better PF music collection and, overall, with better music.
Best regards - and have a nice day!
/fwa
* note this is actually the THIRD Partridge Family compilation ever done - the first two are out of print and were only released on vinyl.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2000
I don't own any CDs of the Partridge Family yet, but am seriously considering getting one. I'm another of those who was a kid (six in 1970) when the PF became popular, and I remember a lot of these tunes as well as the album covers (I also had the same crush on Susan Dey that all boys were required to). My two favorites (like a few other people here, I see, LOL) were "Summer Days" and "I'll Meet You Halfway," both of which strongly remind me of a girl I liked at the time (her name was Dotti Jo if she's out there!).
I guess I'm just writing to say the following to those people who are spewing the sarcastic remarks about this stuff: Knock it off! It's nostalgia, for pete's sake! We were little kids growing up in different times, we sang these songs in our heads walking to school when thinking about the little girl across the room we had a crush on. So stop with the modern day "weren't the 70s awful" retro-criticism stuff, alright? I'm a fan of artists like Van Halen, Springsteen, Styx, etc., but yes, I love a few of those PF songs even now. Not because I think their music quality rivaled, say, the Beatles (although "I Think I Love You" outsold "Let It Be" and "Bridge Over Troubled Water" in 1970), but because it brings back happy childhood memories long forgotten. So grow up, ya little punks (I'm sure most of the spewers are under 30), and let people enjoy what they like. Incidentally, I think much of TODAY's music is nothing but disharmonious garbage passing for talent. More so than in the 70s, it is TODAY's music that requires no real talent -- if you can bang two trash can lids together, you can get on MTV. This editorial was brought to you by...
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on May 7, 2005
This compilation came out on Arista in 1989 and is the first PF CD to be released. The artwork for the cover is a PF lunchbox on a collage of colors similar to the bus. The first Greatest Hits was a picture of them in a house...At Home With Their Greatest Hits(1972) and folowed by The World Of The Partridge Family(1974), a blow up of the same photo.

PF fans are a little different from David Cassidy fans, oddly enough and when they compile the 2 together, everyone gets upset! David Cassidy included 3 PF hits on his Greatest Hits(1974) to make the LP have more buying power. They would have been better off adding his own 3 much sought after hits Daydream, the non lp B-sides All I Wanna Do Is Touch You (b/w Cherish) and Frozen Noses (b/w If I Didn't Care)

This collection includes David Cassidy's first 2 hits Cherish and Could It Be Forever and 14 PF favorites. The openning theme Come On Get Happy arks the first time release on a PF collection. It also includes How Long Is Too Long from Bulletin Board (STILL not available on CD!) The rest are their hits and most noteable album tracks like Summer Days, One Night Stand and Point Me In The Direction Of Albuquerque.

Missing in this collection are the hits Breaking Up Is Hard To Do, Friend And A Lover, Walking In The Rain and their last single released in 1973-4 Looking For A Good Time. Also, there is no inclusion of any material from Crossword Puzzle.

So the only reason to have this in your collection is for How Long Is Too Long. Otherwise choose the Definitive Collection or the New Very Best for hard to get stuff.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on October 31, 2004
Also known as Lunchbox this now defunct release by Arista came out in 1989 and tooted 16 of their greatest hits. Although the theme song "C'mon Get Happy" was not a hit is happily included here to set the theme as well as two of David's solo hits "Cherish" and "Could It Be Forever" which shows a little insightful research could go a long way. I personally believe Arista should have recognized David's solo potential both then AND now and put out a separate solo greatest hits for him. Curiously absent are any singles from "Crossword Puzzle" which may have spawned no hits but neither did "Bulletin Board" but the cut "How Long Is Too Long" (a great song though!) is in the mix here. The collection DOES include most of the Family's biggest hits and it DOES make for a fun listen! All the power house tunes are here so C'mon Get Happy!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HALL OF FAMEon December 17, 2004
The late 1960s and early 1970s were the golden age of teen pop and the Partridge Family were one of the prime purveyors thereof. This greatest hits album lets you relive this wonderful era with melodious songs like the singalong I Think I Love You, the catchy Doesn't Somebody Want To Be Wanted and the surprisingly mature I'll Meet You Halfway, a really soulful song. Other lovely pop ditties include It's One Of Those Nights, Cherish, Could It Be Forever and the great hit Looking Through The Eyes Of Love. I think that this album includes some of David Cassidy's solo hits because he became a star in his own right in the early 1970s and did very well, especially in the UK. The music is pure pop heaven and compares well with the clinical stuff that passes for pop and rules the airwaves nowadays. If you like tuneful, catchy music and bright vocal harmonies, you'll love this trip down memory lane.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 23, 1999
Great album, although I would prefer the original (Bell) compilation which featured "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do" All the songs sound as great as they did when I was a kid. Now when will the other remaining albums (Notebook,Crossword Puzzle, and Bulletin Board) be release? We are all still waiting. The music out there today is so hard to listen to. People may critcize us for liking this music(I also like The Archies and The Carpenters), but at least I can understand the words, What the songs message (as if every song has to have a message) is and a melody that is like ear candy.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 11, 2000
Okay, I'm only 29 and actually had a crush on SHAUN Cassidy, but I LOVED the PF in re-runs during the 70's. As most before me wrote, David Cassidy has a great voice and I'll agree, although he didn't like the type of music he had to sing for the show/albums, he did a great job at it! I saw "The David Cassidy Story" the other night on TV and since then all I'm singing is "I Think I Love You" and driving people crazy!
I hope those that saw the biography will pick up on the great music that was just "happy" with no deep meaning and pick up any of the albums generated by the show (The first ones are better, I think). It may also give David Cassidy the recognition he deserves all over again because of his talent. Being so young in the 70's I didn't recognize his true potential of being anyone but Keith Partridge.
All in all, a great "feel-good" album!
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on April 3, 2002
There can be no doubt that the Partridge Family represented rock artistry at its very finest. The melodies are infectious, the lyrics are insightful, and the performances are sublime. Of course, frontman David Cassidy, as lead vocalist (and Claptonesque lead guitarist), was often the main focus of attention, which is understandable; however, the marvelous contributions of the other members of the band should not be overlooked. For example, few others (except perhaps Keith Emerson or Rick Wakeman) could match the sheer artistry which Susan Dey brought to the keyboards, and, of course, Shirley Jones was equally skilled in that area. Danny Bonaduce's bass work was similarly brilliant (I defy Jack Bruce to do better), and was vitally important to crafting the inimitable PF sound, as was the wonderful tambourine playing of Suzanne Crough. It is also noteworthy that the rest of the band was able to adapt so well to the stylistic changes caused by the departure of original drummer Jeremy Gelbwaks (whose style was reminiscent of the great Keith Moon) and his replacement, Brian Forster, whose steady hand and keen sense of rhythm rivalled the legendary Charlie Watts. Although I have always been a devoted Gelbwaks fan, I have to admit that Forster was a brilliant replacement. Of course, in addition to their wonderful instrumental talents, all the Partridges were superb vocalists, with the voices blending in stunningly beautiful harmonies unmatched by any other band in the history of rock music. This stuff is real, sincere, and heartfelt rock at its best.
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