Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.00
  • Save: $2.70 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Party Of Fear: The Am... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Murfbooks
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item is in good condition. May include some wear and creases on the cover. Fast shipping. Free delivery confirmation with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Party Of Fear: The American Far Right from Nativism to the Militia Movement Paperback – November 14, 1995


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.30
$13.40 $1.36

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Check out The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
$24.30 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Party Of Fear: The American Far Right from Nativism to the Militia Movement + The Age of Reform
Price for both: $33.33

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In this most comprehensive of works covering right-wing movements in the United States since colonial times, Bennett (history, Syracuse) argues that members earnestly sought to defend the country from alien peoples and ideas viewed as a threat to the cherished American way of life. Bennett demonstrates that the perceived danger shifted after the 1919 Bolshevik revolution and the U.S. immigration restrictions in the 1920s from a fear of aliens themselves to fear of such alien ideologies as communism. Although this work is scholarly, illustrations would have enhanced it. Still, it is highly recommended for academic and larger public libraries. Steven D. Zink, Univ. of Nevada Lib., Reno
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Mr. Bennett ... has an eye for arresting detail and subtle contradiction ... a sober, thought-provoking and above all empathetic analysis." -- The New York Times Book Review

"A superbly well-informed narrative history."

-- The Journal of American History
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Revised and updated edition (November 14, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679767215
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679767213
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.2 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,364,601 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on April 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
According to historian David Bennett, the parties of fear took many forms, from the anti-Masonic parties of the 1790s to the Know-Nothings of the 1850s. The American Protective Associations of the 1890s subscribed to nativist formulas, as did the acolytes of the Red Scares after World War I. The Ku Klux Klan became an archetype of anti-alienism during the raucous 1920s. A different sort of nativist ideology emerged after the fall of the Klan, in the form of McCarthyism, the John Birch Society, and the New Right of the 1970s and 1980s. Bennett finds common threads in all of these movements and organizations. Subscribers to the ideologies of hate believed in an America resembling a Garden of Eden, a perfect paradise that promised "freedom, opportunity, individualism, equality for all true Americans." Aliens, outsiders who spoke strange languages, practiced inferior religions, and looked different represented a threat to this concept of an edenic America. Nativists abhorred the foreigners' presence, and they were willing to abandon the very principles they cherished in the fight to preserve their country. Moreover, rising to the endless challenges presented by waves of immigrants and foreign ideas allowed these super patriots to find shelter from status anxiety by banding together with like-minded people.
The history of nativism from the inception of the United States to the 1930s oscillated between anti-Masonic, anti-Catholic, and anti-communist sentiments. Concerns about Freemasonry welded with suspicions of Illuminism offered a hope for Federalists who wished to regain their waning influence in the 1790s. The early anti-communist attacks occurred shortly after the First World War with the Palmer Raids. By far the most important fuel for nativist fires during this period was the Catholics.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Eigenvalue on October 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
Following the 2004 elections, citizens of the U.S. learned that they were less United than they had previously thought. It turned out that there were two countries in the space formerly called America, one red and one blue. The strange thing was that the citizens of each color-coded country believed that the people in the other part of the map were actively working against their own interests. Blue-staters saw red-staters as voting for rich people who exploit them, and red-staters believed blue-staters to be recklessly building up a wasteful government.

I live in a blue state (Canada), and so I was naturally curious to find out what the red-staters were all about. I bought and read Thomas Frank's blockbuster What's the Matter with Kansas?: How Conservatives Won the Heart of America, which turned out to be a kind of character study of the type of person who votes Republican. The analysis is interesting, but rather superficial -- the conclusion was that a lot of working class people vote based on what the media like to call "moral values", which is a felt need to be patriotic, god-fearing, independent, etc. They're drawn to candidates who have personalities that seem to exemplify such values, even when their actions don't. Reagan is the canonical example.

(Interestingly, there doesn't seem to be much in the way of a similar analysis of blue-staters. Every attempt I've seen is almost comically inflammatory and patently wrong. I realize it makes no sense to expect thoughtful insight from the likes of Coulter/D'Souza/O'Reilly, but I haven't seen much else.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 4, 1998
Format: Paperback
Bennett provides an insightful and concise detailing of American history dealing with the rightist movements. From the nativist / anti-papacy movements of the 1840's to the Christian Militia movements with their stress on government conspiracies that are guided by a Jewish elite, this work provides the basis for understanding the reactionary movements which seem so vogue today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Party Of Fear: The American Far Right from Nativism to the Militia Movement
This item: The Party Of Fear: The American Far Right from Nativism to the Militia Movement
Price: $27.00 $24.30
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com