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The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education Paperback – September 1, 2006


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The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education + Building the Christian Academy + The Great Tradition: Classic Readings on What It Means to Be an Educated Human Being
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Academic (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801027349
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801027345
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #676,908 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Norman Klassen (D.Phil., University of Oxford) is associate professor of English at St. Jerome's University in Waterloo, Ontario. He is the author of Chaucer on Love, Knowledge, and Sight.

Jens Zimmermann (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is professor of English and modern languages and Canadian Research Chair in Interpretation, Religion, and Culture at Trinity Western University in Langley, British Columbia. He is the author of Recovering Theological Hermeneutics: An Incarnational-Trinitarian Theory of Interpretation.

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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By David W. Opderbeck on March 27, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is explores the themes of whether, and how, Christians can develop a rich and passionate life of the mind. Although it is written for Christian students bound for university, it is useful for any Christian who is serious about the intellectual life.

One of the authors' goals is to defuse the "warfare" mentality concerning faith and "secular" learning that some Christians, particularly those who are not very mature in the faith, often seem to develop. They propose to do this through the model of "Incarnational Humanism."

"Incarnational Humanism" takes the incarnation of Christ as a starting point for a Christian approach to learning. "In Christ," the authors state, "all fragmentation ends and a new humanity begins, a new creation in which all knowledge is united (or taken captive, as Paul puts it) under the lordship of Christ because in him the divine and the human are firmly joined forever." The pattern of the incarnation suggests that we should expect to find that truth is not "an abstract, timeless concept," but rather is mediated through human language, culture, and tradition. Therefore, Christians should not be afraid of truth located outside the hermetically sealed world of our particular religious subcultures.

In short, the authors place a Kuyperian notion of "common grace," as mediated for generations of Christian college students by Arthur Holmes' famous dictum that "All Truth is God's Truth," into the postmodern context. While the authors thus acknowledge the postmodern turn, they firmly deny the destructive Nietzschean postmodernism, evident in figures such as Michael Foucault, that rejects any notion of classical humanism in favor of a heuristic of power relationships.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alicia on June 13, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
a fantastic read, went perfectly with Brave New World and pretty much EVERY other book I enjoyed in college…

give it a try!
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