The Patience Stone 2013 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(8) IMDb 7/10
Available in HD

THE PATIENCE STONE is adapted from the best-selling novel by Atiq Rahimi. It tells a story of a young woman watching hover her older husband, in a country torn apart by war.

Starring:
Golshifteh Farahani, Hamid Djavadan
Runtime:
1 hour 42 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Patience Stone

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama
Director Atiq Rahimi
Starring Golshifteh Farahani, Hamid Djavadan
Supporting actors Hassina Burgan, Massi Mrowat, Mohamed Al Maghraoui, Malak Djaham Khazal, Faiz Fazli, Hatim Seddiki, Mouhcine Malzi, Amine Ennaji, Hiba Lharrak, Aya Abida, Fatima Mastouri, Sabah Benseddik, Ahmed Ait Mahrabi, Mustapha Lamsawab, Mostafa Jamai, Ghaya El Marouane, Hafida Himouch, Hicham Belaoudi
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

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Once quietly praying, now she screams.
Tintin
We should all support those organizations that try to give girls & women a chance at education in Afghanistan, Pakistan as well as other countries.
G. Teslovich
A somewhat draggy and repetitious film but with enough exotic, erotic and esoteric features to make it humanly interesting.
Cary B. Barad

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 13, 2013
Format: DVD
"The Patience Stone" (2012 release from Algeria; 102 min.) brings the story of an (unnamed) woman who is tending to her wounded husband, who we later learn was shot when defending his family's honor after being insulted. The husband is markedly older than her. As the movie starts to unfold, the woman is starting to spill secrets to her comatose husband about her upbringing and, more importantly, her 10 year marriage to him. Apart from the emotional state of affairs, the woman and her two young daughters are trying to cope with living in a war-torn area (Afghanistan, presumably), where militia regularly search house by house. One day, the woman's house is searched by a commander and a younger soldier. To tell you more of the plot would ruin your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Couple of comments: this movie is based on the book of the same name by Atiq Rahimi, who adopted his novel for the big screen and also directed this (and beautifully, I may add). There are several aspects of the movie that are deeply unsettling, none more so than the submissive role Muslim women are forced to endure in the Muslim world. They didn't ask for it, yet they have no choice. At one point, the wife tells her husband about how her sister, then 12 years old, is sold off by their father in order to settle a lost bet, and nothing can be done about it. When you see the wife going about her business inside the house, and then having to wear a burqua (a loose dress that covers the whole body from head to toe) when going outside, it is unsettling to me.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Tintin on December 27, 2013
Format: DVD
In Persian folklore, there exists a magic black stone, Syng-e-saboor (the Patience Stone), to which one can confide everything. The stone listens, soaking in all the words, the secrets, the miseries, until it finally explodes, and on that day, one is instantly delivered of all one's sufferings and worries. Some even say this stone is the one in the Kaaba and on the day it explodes, it will be the Apocalypse.

The Patience Stone is an unusual war film, based on the eponymous novel that won the Prix Goncourt 2008, brilliantly adapted to the screen by author Atiq Rahimi (Earth and Ashes, 2004) himself, in collaboration with his friend, the legendary scenarist, Jean-Claude Carrière (The Unbearable Lightness of Being, 1988, Belle de Jour, 1967, The Mahabarata, 1989, plus 136 more credits on his résumé). This was Rahimi's fourth book, and the first one written in French rather than in Dari, his maternal language

In Kabul in ruins, following the retreat of the Soviet occupation forces in 1990, rival bands of mujahidin are fighting like rabid dogs over the remnants of the city. In this apocalyptic world, a man lies comatose on a mattress in a bare room of his house. This "warrior of Allah" has been decerebrated by a bullet lodged in the back of his neck, not while fighting for his religion or his country, but during a fratricide fight that took place when one of his comrades insulted him. The angry exchange resulted in gunfire, and his serious wound. His wife kneels next to him, fingering her prayer beads, chanting the ninety-nine names of Allah. The mullah instructed her that if she did so, in fifteen days her husband would again be well. But after nearly three weeks, he is still totally unresponsive.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bear on May 14, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
It was beautifully filmed and a joy to watch. It made me grateful to live in a country where I have rights even if I am female.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MonkeyDogEntertainment on April 12, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I am currently writing a book about my linguist in Iraq called Maifi Dem.

I watched this movie to get a taste of someone else's view on the life of a married couple in a foreign country with similar restrictions to what obedience is pertaining to religion.

This I would say, even with subtitles, one that to me enjoyed it "not" being in English.

I work in Afghanistan now, revealing an insight to perhaps some of those that work around me and how their lives might or could be after they go home from work is very helpful.

I just hope my book reaches the level of this writer/director. Thank you for putting this to film - I really fell into the experience.
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