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The Penland Book of Ceramics: Masterclasses in Ceramic Techniques Hardcover – March 1, 2003


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The Penland Book of Ceramics: Masterclasses in Ceramic Techniques + The Figure in Clay: Contemporary Sculpting Techniques by Master Artists (A Lark Ceramics Book)
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Product Details

  • Series: A Lark Ceramics Book
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Lark Books; 1 edition (March 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 157990338X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579903381
  • Product Dimensions: 11.5 x 8.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #393,439 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book is great to learn special techniques from Masters in Clay. One does need significant background in clay such as throwing techniques, slab making, coil building etc. These are not discussed in detail, but great pieces of work have been demonstrated in extreme detail assuming basic knowledge.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Leslie J. Wentzell on August 4, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The title of the book leads one to expect to receive the technical information needed to try any of the techniques demonstrated. The book does not always live up to this promise. For example, the multilayered slip technique presented by Mary Barringer demonstrates the use of slips before and after bisquing. The most critical factor here would be the composition of the slip to accommodate the shrinkage of the bisque. Granted, there are many slip recipes out there, but not all will work here. I don't need to see pictures of her brushing the slip on. That is the stuff of beginner books (if even) not "Master classes". The physical techniqes of building , modelling and shaping are well illustrated, and so the book does have its value. Michael Sherril's use of extruded clay to make his fantastic sculptures was eyeopening, and well demonstrated.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The pictures were great, also I liked the instructional part. The example of how to tell if the glaze is deflocuulated by putting your hands in and watch how it flows was so visual, I have used it every time I defluculated a glaze.
It also shwed a different way to have your way with the clay, like those things that look like bananaas, how do you do that with clay, the book explained it in enough detail for your to copy,in your own style. I am very pleased with this book.
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19 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Bruce P. Barten on January 16, 2004
Format: Hardcover
THE PENLAND BOOK OF CERAMICS is certainly large and colorful. The Penland School of Crafts, located in the mountains of North Carolina, seems large enough to be considered a community. "Today the school encompasses 43 buildings located on 400 acres of land. Each year approximately 1,200 people come to Penland for instruction and another 12,000 pass through as visitors." (p. 205). I expected to find more pictures in the book of the interesting three-dimensional conglomeration on the cover, which is probably not a bunch of bananas, but maybe the artist thought it was. The colors are similar to the "Yellowstone Rhododendron, 2001" and "Mountain Magnolia, 2001" shown on page 53. Even if it is supposed to be a bunch of bananas, that would not make it the most surreal thing in this book.
I have had difficulty thinking about objects that appear to be weird in three dimensions, so the complexity of many of the pieces seems miraculous to me, but the step-by-step explanations of the process of constructing a few items demonstrate the possibilities of getting there bit by bit. The first artist featured in the book, Clara "Kitty" Couch, produces terra cotta vessels that open out at the top with an edge so thin, looking so flimsy, that the first picture in the hands on series, "Rolling out the slab" (p. 17), showing the clay under a rolling pin, ought to produce an immense leap in the understanding of how the material is originally flattened before it is formed. There are also pictures of Joe Bova "Rolling out a 12-pound (5.4 kg) slab to a thickness of at least 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) on a piece of plywood" (p. 152) and Mary Barringer "applying texture with a tectured roller" (p.198). A description of Kitty Couch's work is called "Contemplative Coilings" (p.
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