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The People As Enemy: The Leaders' Hidden Agenda in World War II Paperback – May 1, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-1551642161 ISBN-10: 1551642166

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Black Rose Books (May 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551642166
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551642161
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,330,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Spritzler holds a Doctor of Science degree in Biostatistics from the Harvard School of Public Health where he is employed as a Research Scientist engaged in AIDS clinical trials. He is the author of People As Enemy: The Leaders' Hidden Agenda in World War II.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 9 customer reviews
I urge everyone who can, to read this book!
Amy Sobol
Seldom has a work of history been more acutely relevant to understanding our present and our possible futures.
David G. Stratman
This book is shockingly revealing as to what really happened during that time.
Josephine Perri

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By David G. Stratman on July 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
John Spritzler's The People As Enemy: The Leaders' Hidden Agenda in World War II is a powerful, necessary, and inspiring book. Read it and you will never see World War II in the same way. More to the point, you will never see contemporary capitalist society in the same way. Spritzler explodes the myth of "the good war" by taking apart, piece by careful piece, much of the structure of lies and myths designed to buttress capitalist rule and exposes the system in its ugliness and ultimate weakness.
Spritzler shows too that there is a powerful counter-force to capitalism at work in society: working men and women fighting everywhere for a better world, a force so threatening that the most powerful elites on earth waged a world war to extinguish it. This counter-force was not defeated on the field of battle in World War II so much as misled and betrayed by Communist leaders in a little-known history from which we have not yet recovered. The People as Enemy is a giant step toward understanding and breaking free of that history.
There are three key myths about WWII which this book lays bare: that the war was caused by conflicts between nations; that the top priority of the Allied leaders in the war was to defeat the Fascists; and that Allied bombing of civilians was part of the effort to defeat the Fascists.
World War II was a desperate means of social control undertaken by the elites of the warring nations as the only alternative to working class revolution. In four of the countries which Spritzler examines-Germany, Japan, Great Britain, and the U.S.-government leaders were driven to war not chiefly by fear of other countries but by fear of their own people. The ruling elites of these countries went to war because they saw no other way to stay in power.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Thomas J. Laney on June 30, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's not easy to believe a few people are so greedy and powerful that American soldiers can be sent to war without any real debate by either party, to make powerful and wealthy people even more powerful and wealthy. Can anyone really be that corrupt?
A few weeks ago, a 22-year old Marine Sgt. named Kirk Strasesskie jumped into a canal south of Baghdad when a helicopter hit the water. Kirk drowned trying to save his Marine friends. His friends back home in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin said he could barely swim. In high school, Strasesskie had played sports and spent much of his free time with kids who struggled with their learning disabilities. His dad, an Army veteran, questioned whether the Iraq War was just and why his son should have been there at all?
Kirk Strasesskie's always going to be a hero for me, just like my Army uncle who fought in WWII in New Guinea and those Marines at Iwo Jima and those paratroopers at Bastogne and Chosin. Heroes all, just like my auto worker friends who battle each day and night against their Vietnam experience. Their lives are such a contrast with those boundlessly powerful, elite, selfish few who so easily send them into our constant wars.
I lump them all together today, those heroic figures whose lives were risked or ended fighting for their friends in wars that all were so unnecessary except for WWII - the "good war" of course.
But, as it turns out, while WWII saw heroic soldiers dying on South Pacific beaches and in the frozen foxholes at the Bulge, the most powerful people in our country did business with the Nazis and Fascists making enormous profits on the deaths of 50 million people and laying the groundwork for post war elite control. It was not such a "good war" after all.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Amy Sobol on May 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
Browsing the bookstore, first, I just liked the cover and the title, "The People as Enemy"-- caught my attention!!
Then, expecting to be bored with WWII history, etc. etc. what I found out (couldn't put the book down!)..was all this hidden agenda stuff that went on, which we never knew about, were never directly told, but.. clearly from this author's extensive research and investigation... was beyond a shred of doubt,going on.
The book is easy to read, even for someone who is not a history buff per se-- but who has an active and inquiring mind.
Thank you, John Spritzler, for hugely shedding light on this misconception of the "good war," and for letting us know the real motives behind it. It's almost hard to believe, but with all your direct references and direct quotes, it's impossible to not believe. Ya mean, it wasn't so "good" after all!? Who woulda thunk it.....
And thank you for making such obvious, in the end, brilliant comparisons to the "good war" (Bush's) we just fought.
I urge everyone who can, to read this book!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Mcgrath on January 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
The book is going to be very offensive reading material. However it is very carefully researched and recasts the narrative of WW2 in an original way. The unseen hand of Krupp, IG Farben, Ford, GM IBM etc and their mysterious relationships during the war have remained unfathomable until now. The book puts the strands into a coherant package. Why do ordinary farm boys and factory workers die in modern wars instead of powerful business and political leaders?
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