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The People of the Secret Paperback – January 1, 1985


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Paperback, January 1, 1985
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 263 pages
  • Publisher: Octagon Press; New edition edition (1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0863040381
  • ISBN-13: 978-0863040382
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #955,139 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Do invisible guardians of this planet "seed" ideas into the Earth’s cultures... (to) prepare human beings ahead of time for huge steps in their development? This theory... is discussed in fascinating details " ... Daily Mail

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

... a compelling intellectual adventure. If the author had been born a few centuries ago, he would have been burnt for heresy. But his real crime would not have been in expressing heterodox and dangerous ideas, but in expressing them so brilliantly and persuasively.--Colin Wilson, from the Introduction

Copyright © 1983. Octagon Press. All rights reserved.


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Reading this book consciously, one will see numerous glimpses of something deep, behind the words in use.
Bokhara
If after reading this book one is curious or further intrigue or would like to learn more, I would recommend, The Sufis and The Way of the Sufi by Idries Shah.
David Paquiot
This book provided encouragement to keep striving for improvement within limits with hope for a possible breakthrough.
Sincerely Interested

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 49 people found the following review helpful By George Matthews on September 2, 2001
This is a very strange book indeed. It challenges all the established notions of the causes of historical events. It does not read like a cultist account. After reading it I think anyone will find his thoughts about the nature of history will change, even if he thinks all or most of the contents are nonsense.
Clearly the author has been closely associated with the modern expressions of the Sufi tradition.
The references within the text give the reader links to much other material and show signs of genuine scholarship - quite different from the run of the mill cultist books which fill the shelves of so many bookshops.
Among the topics which the western reader may find startling are thoughts about the origins of western science, Shakespear, much of western literature and its relation to what is often thought of as 'eastern' literature. Even the current decline of religion and the rise of drug taking are mentioned as being possibly the results of causes quite unsuspected by the average person.
I have been reading this book since it was first published in 1983 and still find new thoughts in it.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By David Paquiot on April 11, 2005
That there are things in history that don't fall in line or don't fit a specific pattern is common knowledge. That there are many unexplained similarities in history is also common knowledge. However, so far there has not been any explication as to 'why'

This book by Ernst Scott with great clarity that there is a `why'. There is an undercurrent of knowledge that has been responsible for shaping many important moments in the history of the human race. By knowledge I don't just mean the quotidian knowledge. The knowledge referred to here is that which can raise the human consciousness to its highest potentialities.

Ernst Scott first carefully makes the case for this knowledge. Then in great detail shows its operation in history. Then Mr. Scott starts to make a case for the "People of the Secret" - the people who possess this knowledge and have been responsible for systematically injecting this into the realm of human affairs.

Whether or not one believes in or accepts Mr. Scott's final conclusion over the course of reading this book serious doubts will be cast on the history we were taught on our elementary and high school benches. If what James Joyce said is true, and History is that nightmare we are trying to awake from, then this book is a strong jolt that may start to rouse us out of that deep sleep of ages. If after reading this book one is curious or further intrigue or would like to learn more, I would recommend, The Sufis and The Way of the Sufi by Idries Shah.

Thanks
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 6, 2000
If read as a modern teaching story, this is a very good book. Not everything in it is a straightforward real event, I suspect, but a method of giving people with no experience of a 'mystical' organization a feel for happens within one. By reading it and several other of the Octagon and Ishk titles in the same vein (TRAVELS WITH A SUFI MASTER, ADVENTURES IN AFGANISTAN, ALONE IN THE ARABIAN NIGHTS, ETC.) one can get a feel for how modern Sufism is presented. This is as close as one can probably get without being a student. It is a very good read.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Tim L. Melancon on July 21, 2005
The author accomplished an incredible amount of research and documentation for this book. Anyone interested in metaphysics, the occult,history,pyramidology,egytology, Alchemy....etc...etc....will find this book impossible to put down!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Desmond Wood on April 4, 2007
This book is for anyone seeking a more coherent theory as to the history of humanity, and particularly epistemological research. Many people are searching for a more palpable reason for human existence. In this book are keys to unraveling the mysteries of existence. Splendid, courageous and well written! Ernest Scott has provided the much needed data to induce the desire for further research, the re-writing of history as the common man knows it, and new views of human eschatology.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 21, 2000
The previous reviewer is in error on at least one point inhis/her criticism of Scott's book. I refer readers to: a multimedialibrary article, for example, wherein the author, a literary scholar, notes that 'On the subject of God, he (Blake) even borrowed a thought from the Gnostic heresy, as he was indebted to the Jewish Cabala for his vision of the man who anciently contained all things of heaven and earth in himself.' Perhaps the most valuable parts of Scott's volume are the sections wherein he relates conversations and other first-hand and original material from genuine Sufi sources. In other books is to be found the assertion that 'a real book may be written to contain just one piece of information', the rest being, as it were, almost irrelevant; but if that one piece of information is a piece you need, that book will be more highly prized than whole libraries stuffed with unprovocative -- and unhelpful -- data. One caveat must be offered, however, with regard to Wilson's unfortunate contribution. He has obviously been taken in by the (long since admitted)hoax by the Californian prankster E.J. Gold entitled 'Secret Talks With Mr. G.' Apparently Wilson thinks it really has something to do with Gurdjieff, and it is a pity that mischief is given the opportunity to waste the time of many readers by being perpetuated in a context in which they have no opportunity of seeing for themselves that that is what it is.
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