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The Peripheral Son: A Dick Hardesty Mystery Paperback – October 31, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Zumaya Boundless (October 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936144107
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936144105
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #824,535 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

With the release of Caesar's Fall, book #3 of the Elliott Smith paranormal mysteries, Dorien Grey places a 17th book on his shelf of published work, joining the 13-title Dick Hardesty mystery series and the stand-alone Western/adventure/romance novel Calico. The release of a new edition of The Bar Watcher is the first of what will be redesigned editions of the entire Dick Hardesty series previously published by GLB Publishing. Dorien is also hard at work on an all-new Elliott Smith and John novel.

More About the Author

Born Roger Margason in Rockford, Illinois, far too many years ago, Dorien emerged, like Athena from the sea, full-blown with the first book in the Dick Hardesty Mystery series in 2000. Roger, a lifelong book and magazine editor, is in charge of all the details of day-to-day living, allowing Dorien full freedom to write books and blogs. The Dick Hardesty series was followed by the Elliott Smith Mystery series, which now alternates with the Dick Hardesty series.

Dorien emerged partly because Roger has always resented reality. It is far too capricious and too often unkind and unfair. Roger avoids reflective surfaces whenever possible. Having Dorien as an alter ego allows the "duo" to create their own reality, and worlds over which they have some degree of control.

Both are incurable romantics, believing strongly in things which reality views too often with contempt, such as happy endings, true love, and the baic goodness of people.

As the real-life spokesman for the pair and using "I" for both, the one personal characteristic in which I take great pride, and which has been my rock throughout life is that I never, ever, takes myself too seriously. If one has a choice between positive and negative, why would anyone (though too many people do) opt for the negative? Life is not always kind, but it is a gift beyond measure, and one which must all too soon be given back. I really try to enjoy and be thankful for ever single day allotted to me.

For most people, children are their posterity. For me, as a gay man, it is my words which will, I hope, stand as evidence that I was here (albeit, no matter how long I may live, never long enough to suit me).

And because written words are nothing unless someone reads them, I am heavily reliant on my readers, who I sincerely consider to be partners and traveling companions on every journey my writing embarks on.

I invite you, individually and personally, to join me. And you are cordially invited to visit my website: www.doriengrey.com

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
The ending seemed a little forced.
Wynn "Devoted Reader"
It is always lovely to see the main characters in the story actually live their lives just the way we do like growing old, making/enjoying memorable and happy days.
Yukako Muller
Much recommended for mystery purists.
Bob Lind

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By British Bulldog on December 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is the fourteenth Dick Hardesty mystery. I've eagerly and anxiously awaited each. Reviewing these stories gives me a dilemma however. On the one hand I feel a duty to read the book quickly so I can return my review, on the other I want to savour each chapter, maybe reread passages so I can be sure I don't miss anything. And on the third hand (yeah, I know) I want to read it all from cover to cover as quickly as possible so I can see whodunit.

Victor Koseva, a neat-freak of an investigative journalist who had the misfortune to be born into a particularly unpleasant family, and also to have ruffled feathers in his investigating of a labour union and a boxing promoter, falls to his death from a hill path. Most people think that's all it was, a fall, but his sister-in-law thinks otherwise and asks Dick Hardesty to investigate.

I love the occasional slight breaking of the fourth wall that Grey occasionally indulges in. At one point Dick is exasperated at the case and thinks, "It's the same kind of frustration I get when the author of a mystery novel drops a hint, all but puts up a flashing arrow saying "Clue!" and then never mentions it again." Grey doesn't do that to his readers.

I love the fact that these stories are set some time in the `80s. The mentioning of products such as Sony's Walkman brings back wonderful memories. How quaint we think of the items now, but at the time they were state of the art. I'm sure Dick's work would be made much easier by the use of cell phones, but, alas, no, he'll have to wait a few years before that technology comes along.

We're told that Max, one of the minor characters, has got a job in the World Trade Center. I wonder if this will figure in a later story when 9/11 comes around?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By interested_observer on December 7, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"The Peripheral Son" involves a hard-driving, manipulative, investigative reporter named Victor Koseva, who is probing deeply into drug use at a boxing gym and into corruption at a union whose workers will be building a new boxing arena. The twist is that Victor Koseva is the natural son of Frank Koseva, the owner of these facilities. The father has long shunned the now peripheral son as a result of a family tragedy and because the son is gay. Victor shows up dead one day from a fall in a cruising park. Was it an accident? Victor's one friend calls in private investigator Dick Hardesty.

Enjoying Dorien Grey's works, I have collected all of the Dick Hardesty and Elliott Smith mysteries. I have especially enjoyed the developing relationships between Dick and Jonathan in the first series and between Elliott and John in the second. With the addition of the adopted Joshua, who starts elementary school in this book, there is now a stronger focus on childcare activities. This is natural in the circumstances, and it usefully depicts a realistic, underused aspect of detective and gay-couple life. Nevertheless, I find myself regretting that Jonathan and the friends of Dick and Jonathan are turning into means for Dick and Joshua to get things done.

I had been wondering about why Dick Hardesty did his research the old-fashioned way in the library, not using the internet. There was a mention in Chapter 7 that two of Dick's friends had just moved into an 88th floor office in the World Trade Center's North Tower.

The book implicitly suggests contrasting peripheral son Victor's character and upbringing with that of the non-peripheral son, Joshua. Having friends and support is more productive than building walls and using people as needed.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sharon on November 17, 2011
Format: Paperback
I was supposed to mow the lawn this morning but there was no way this was happening when I had just received Dorien Grey's latest book in the Dick Hardesty series, The Peripheral Son. This book lived up to all expectations and it has a permanent place on my bookshelf.
The mystery is well thought and, even though all the clues were present, I did not know 'whodunit' until the very end.
I also love watching Dick, Jonathan and Joshua at home. They are like my extended family and I always want to know what they are up to.
Many of Dick and Johnathan's friends make an appearance and it's great to catch up with them too.
The only complaint I now have is that I have to wait for the next book in the series. I don't think that Mr Grey will ever be able to write fast enough for my liking.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By British Bulldog on December 8, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
This is the fourteenth Dick Hardesty mystery. I've eagerly and anxiously awaited each. Reviewing these stories gives me a dilemma however. On the one hand I feel a duty to read the book quickly so I can return my review, on the other I want to savour each chapter, maybe reread passages so I can be sure I don't miss anything. And on the third hand (yeah, I know) I want to read it all from cover to cover as quickly as possible so I can see whodunit.

Victor Koseva, a neat-freak of an investigative journalist who had the misfortune to be born into a particularly unpleasant family, and also to have ruffled feathers in his investigating of a labour union and a boxing promoter, falls to his death from a hill path. Most people think that's all it was, a fall, but his sister-in-law thinks otherwise and asks Dick Hardesty to investigate.

I love the occasional slight breaking of the fourth wall that Grey occasionally indulges in. At one point Dick is exasperated at the case and thinks, "It's the same kind of frustration I get when the author of a mystery novel drops a hint, all but puts up a flashing arrow saying "Clue!" and then never mentions it again." Grey doesn't do that to his readers.

I love the fact that these stories are set some time in the `80s. The mentioning of products such as Sony's Walkman brings back wonderful memories. How quaint we think of the items now, but at the time they were state of the art. I'm sure Dick's work would be made much easier by the use of cell phones, but, alas, no, he'll have to wait a few years before that technology comes along.

We're told that Max, one of the minor characters, has got a job in the World Trade Center. I wonder if this will figure in a later story when 9/11 comes around?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

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