The Planets

February 12, 1991 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
10:55
2
8:38
3
5:22
4
17:27
5
9:45

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 29, 1991
  • Release Date: October 29, 1991
  • Label: RCA Victor
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0013AZPXS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #36,294 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
26
4 star
8
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 38 customer reviews
Then he used these sounds very effectively in some amazing orchestrations.
Jeff N
I think it's the dream of virtually every genuinely creative person, that their work will live on into the future and be transalted into the future's new terms.
Brendan (brendan@webworks.demon.co.uk)
Anyone who is a fan of electronica, analog digital music and classical will surely love this classic album.
Spencer Taylor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By R. Mark Anderson on November 12, 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After reading a few of the other reviews I had to write one of my own. These guys just don't get it! They keep griping about it not being true to the original work by Holst. The fact is that it was never meant to be like the original. Tomita is telling a story here using electronic music and effects, and he does a fantastic job of it! If the other reviewers just listened without all the judgenent they could see a story unfold in their minds through the awesome expressivness of Tomita's sounds. It goes like this: two friends blast off in space ships, they patrol around, they get some r&r, then there is a huge space battle and one of them gets lost. The other pilot calls to his friend, they can barely hear each other and the lost one knows he isn't coming back. Together they sing their planetary anthem, then the lost guy is taken by a space storm. This version of The Planets is well worth owning, it has a true emotional appeal and different people see different stories as they listen. It takes an open mind that isn't cluttered with expectations to really get into this experience.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey J.Park VINE VOICE on June 4, 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This 1976 release by Japanese electronic composer Isao Tomita presents his all-electronic adaptation of The Planets Op. 32, which was written during 1914-1916 by British composer Gustav Holst (1874 - 1934). Holst is best known for this orchestral suite, although he hated the publicity it generated. As a huge fan of 1970's progressive rock, I have listened to my fair share of prog rock bands interpreting bits and pieces of The Planets, e.g. King Crimson, Morgan etc., so an electronic version of the entire work really piqued my curiosity.

Isao plays what sounds like an RMI electric harpsichord, pipe organ, string synthesizer (I think), in addition to the mini-moog synthesizer, which is an instrument that seems to generate an infinite number of sounds, at least in his hands. The sounds of the moog synthesizer dominate this recording and evoke the vacuum and cold of outer space, but are also quite sensitive as well. The seven pieces range in length from 5'22" to 17'26", are blended together (unlike the original) and cover a range of moods and dynamics - much like the original work. Isao injects his own personality into each piece, so I found the listening experience to be very interesting, and at times pretty funny (he has a great sense of humor).

Mars has been called the most devastating piece of music ever written and I think that Isao more or less pulls this piece off, although there are some slightly silly sounding synthesizer tones that render the piece as somewhat less than devastating. Venus was intended to be a dreamy and airy movement and Isao does an incredible job with spacey synth textures. This is my favorite movement and probably the most successful.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kimba W. Lion VINE VOICE on November 13, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I first heard this recording when it was released, 24 years ago. I had only recently discovered Tomita via his "Pictures at an Exhibition" (a masterpiece) and I was eager to hear what new thrills Tomita would unleash in "Planets". I listened to the record once, took it off the turntable, and threw it in the trash. Fortunately, I reconsidered a short while later and retrieved it. "Planets", after all, is even better than "Pictures". What caused that initial reaction of mine was not that it is that bad, but that it is that different. My expectations had been completely shaken up.
Tomita has transformed Holst's "Planets" from a suite to a unified whole. No longer a series of musical sketches, it tells a story-and this is why he introduced "extraneous" sounds and effects and doesn't include every last note that Holst wrote. I'm restraining myself from describing the story or devices for fear of cheapening the effect for others-for me Tomita's "Planets" is beautiful, thrilling, frightening, joyous, poignant, and haunting. It's no wonder to me why Holst's estate tried to suppress this recording: it totally obviates the need for any other recording or performance of this music.
A note on the sound: not all of BMG's remixing of Tomita's albums for Dolby Surround were entirely successful. This one is. It is a joy technically as well as musically. Concept, performance, execution: one of the greatest discs of all time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas W. Hullsiek on October 15, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This album is a virtual sonic roller coaster! I bought my first Tomita album (cassette: Pictures At An Exhibition) over 20 years ago and I was absolutely astounded by Tomita's soaring, expansive synthesizer virtuosity. About that same period, I was attending college and one particularly interesting class was Music Appreciation. This was where I first heard the Moussorgski (forgive any misspelling) epic piece (Ravel's version). Being an aficianado of electronic music, I was most eager to hear how Tomita treated it. WOW, I was hooked and purchased subsequent Tomita works. Thank goodness the CD finally came along, because I wore out all my cassettes!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Milton on April 2, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
One of my favorite "transcriptions" of Planets. Listening to this in college introducted me to classical works that has led to life long love of good music. Tomita had the ability to help you "visualize" music, through sound. Wonder what ever happened to him...he seems to have disappeared after the early 80's?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?