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122 of 126 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Our Pleasure Indeed
Those who have read Gleick's biography of Richard P. Feynman (Genius) have probably also read this collection of Feynman's "best short works." This is indeed an odd collection. Feynman is most accessible in the interviews and speeches; least accessible in his "Minority Report to the Space Shuttle Challenger Inquiry." Gleick's biography reveals a man...
Published on January 4, 2000 by Robert Morris

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48 of 56 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars scraping the bottom of the feynmaniana barrel
This book is yet another posthumous compilation of Feynman's musings. With each successive book - starting from the wonderful transcriptions of Leighton, Surely You're Joking Mr. Feynman - they have been declining in quality for years. Well, this is a hodgepodge of paper scraps and even raw oral interviews that have been thrown together to exploit just about the last...
Published on July 16, 2003 by Robert J. Crawford


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122 of 126 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Our Pleasure Indeed, January 4, 2000
Those who have read Gleick's biography of Richard P. Feynman (Genius) have probably also read this collection of Feynman's "best short works." This is indeed an odd collection. Feynman is most accessible in the interviews and speeches; least accessible in his "Minority Report to the Space Shuttle Challenger Inquiry." Gleick's biography reveals a man who exemplifies what Whitman had in mind when he observed "Do I contradict myself? Very well then, I contradict myself. I am large. I contain multitudes." Feynman was indeed large; he contained multitudes. To read this book is to share the pleasure of his company as he formally and informally shares his thoughts and feelings about himself, his life, his career, and just about everything else which attracted his attention. Chapter 1 ("The Pleasure of Finding Things Out") and Chapter 8 ("What Is Science?") are my personal favorites. The aforementioned "Minority Report" (Chapter 7) was, for me, tough going. As I worked my way through this collection, I began to think that I was in the company of someone who has Albert Einstein's intellect and Danny Kaye's personality. Feyman must have been a flamboyant (albeit demanding) classroom teacher. There can be no doubt about his intelligence. Nor his passion and compassion. Nor his playfulness. How much I regret never having known him personally. Therefore, how much I appreciate this collection which I continue to re-read with joy.
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68 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best overview of Feynman's thinking, January 24, 2000
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I recommend this book to people who have never read Feynman before, and to those people who only know Feynman's funny stories.
This book is a good overview of Feynman's thinking and not merely a collection of his humorous anecdotes. If you have read many of his other works and you are expecting a great amount of new material, then this book will probably be a disappointment. However, if you are only marginally familiar with Feynman or not familiar at all with him, I highly recommend it.
I believe some of the less than stellar reviews found here were written by Feynman fans who thought this book contained lots of new material. They are correct claiming there is not a lot of new material here for the well-read Feynman fan. However, for the unfamiliar who doesn't want to read everything he wrote, I believe this is the book to get.
If you are interested more in his humorous storytelling, as opposed to his ideas, then I recommend 'Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman' instead of this book.
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66 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars �The kick in the discovery�, November 8, 2000
This review is from: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (Paperback)
I felt a bit of trepidation when approaching this work, as reading a collection of what are considered "The Best Short Works" of a Nobel Laureate Physicist, sounds daunting even for someone trained to some degree in the field. I am not so trained. Mr. Richard Feynman has the additional gift of speaking passionately, and often in a self-deprecating manner, about what he does, with the result that the layperson can enjoy both his originally spoken, and written thoughts. There are terms and concepts that are understood best, and perhaps only, by those who have made the decision to pursue physics to its higher levels. However the vast majority of the book is readable to any that are inquisitive.
Mr. Feynman's Father was also a remarkable man. He was not a trained scientist, and his profession had absolutely nothing to do with science. However as is repeated throughout the book he was the catalyst that recognized and nurtured the talent his precocious son possessed. This topic and the ideas that are expressed about learning and teaching are just one of the topics that is completely accessible to any reader. The topics make for such interesting reading, as the author's enthusiasm combined with his gift for explaining the complex and the abstract, is what allows his thoughts to be accessible, and this is what I enjoyed so much. He was a man of great enthusiasm for the wonders that he sought to understand, and his writing transfers this feeling to his audience.
The quote that titles this review is Mr. Feynman's way of describing his feelings when he learns something new. The feelings translated not only into every recognition that his peers could bestow, but also a gift to the rest of us, for he was able to apply the same mind to questions of religion, morality, teaching, governmental roles in science, the responsibilities scientists have to society, and dozens of other topics.
I enjoyed the entire work but there were some sections that could have justified the entire time spent reading on their own. His lecture at The Galileo Symposium in 1964, and his report on the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster were remarkable. I was unaware of his role as an investigator into the Challenger episode, and was even more surprised that the committee on which he served attempted to suppress his report. Once you have read his report you will understand why many would have liked to see it locked away. He explains what is arguably the most complex piece of equipment assembled by man, and it is elegant in its simplicity. I believe he intended it to be so, as he could have made his case in language that would have been foreign if he had so chose.
I read this book as I enjoyed "Fermat's Enigma" so much. It is not necessary to understand everything that is involved with what these gifted minds have done. It is a pure joy when you can read and gain a glimpse, just a bit, of the ideas that are discussed. It requires a gifted speaker/writer, and this man clearly counted his extraordinary ability to communicate among his skills.
A wonderful enlightening book.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliance and charm: Feynman as a teacher, April 16, 2002
This review is from: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (Paperback)
I very much enjoyed this entertaining and delightful collection of lectures, talks and essays by the world-renown and sorely missed Professor Feynman, Nobel Prize winning physicist, idiosyncratic genius and one of the great men of the twentieth century.

I particularly enjoyed the subtle yet unmistakable way he scolded the people at NASA for putting their political butts before the safety of the space program they were managing in his famous "Minority Report to the Space Shuttle Challenger Inquiry." But the chapter that really sold me on Richard P. Feynman, boy wonder grown up, was "It's as Simple as One, Two, Three" in which he explores the ability to do two things at once through an experiment with counting. Such a delight he took in learning as a kid from his friend Bernie that we sometimes think in pictures and not in words. And then the further delight he took in learning that some people count with their inner voice (himself), and others (his friend John Tukey) count by visualization.

I was also loved the chapter, "What is Science?", a talk to science teachers in which Feynman demonstrates that the real difference between science and other ways of "knowing" (e.g., religion) is the ability to doubt. In science we learn, as Feyman said he himself learned, to live with doubt. But in the religious way of "knowing" doubt is intolerable. Feynman gives an evolutionary illustration of why doubt is essential. He begins with the "intelligent" animals "which can learn something from experience (like cats)." At this stage, he says, each animal learned "from its own experience." Then came some animals that could learn more rapidly and from the experience of others by watching. Then came something "completely new...things could be learned by one animal, passed on to another, and another, fast enough that...[the knowledge] was not lost to the race...," and could be passed on to a new generation.

Now, let's stop for a moment. What a great teacher does--and here and elsewhere Feynman proves himself to be a great teacher (although he said he doubted that!)--is to guide the student just enough so that the student arrives at or anticipates the point of the lesson before the teacher gets there. What is the punch line of this lesson for the science teachers? Namely this: with the passing of knowledge from one generation to the next it became also possible to pass on false knowledge or "mistaken ideas." Feynman calls this a "disease."

"Then a way of avoiding the disease was discovered. This is to doubt that what is being passed from the past is in fact true, and to try to find out ab initio, again from experience, what the situation is, rather than trusting the experience of the past..."

In other words, don't blindly accept the word of authority. Test it for yourself! And this is what science does. It tests and it tests again, and it doubts and it doubts--always.

I loved this because one of my dictums is "always guide the experts"--the lawyer, the doctor, the insurance adjustor, et al. Always guide them because, although they are the experts, you're the one who really cares. To this I can now add that you should also doubt the experts because even though they are experts they can be wrong. And, as Feynman showed in his report on the Challenge disaster, they can be wrong for reasons that have nothing to do with their expertise.

I also liked the commencement address he gave at Caltech on "Cargo Cult Science...and How to Not Fool Yourself." We fool ourselves a lot. The managers at NASA fooled themselves; what's their names of cold fusion delusion fame fooled themselves. Feynman has noted that he has fooled himself. Science, he avers, is a tool to help us to not fool ourselves. He is profoundly right. Without science we would go on fooling ourselves with all sorts of mumbo-jumbo, "revealed" religiosity and scientific-seeming stuff such as Rhine's ESP experiments some years ago at Duke, the entire litany of New Age pseudobabblese, and--yes!--such stuff as the amazing Cargo Cult Science in which some Pacific Islanders, in an attempt to attract the big birds of the sky with their cargoes of goodies, built "nests," that is, landing fields with empty cargo boxes, and faux towers, etc. in the hope that the planes flying overhead would see them and land on their island. Feynman has taken this as an example of pseudoscience, that is, behavior in the form of science without the substance of science, without the "integrity" of science.

The integrity of science, Feynman advised the graduates, demands that all the information about the experiment be given, even detrimental facts. Feynman contrasts this idea with that of advertizing in which only that which makes the product look good is given.

When reading this book it helps to imagine that one is listening to Feynman speak. The text includes repetitions and the omissions which he no doubt conveyed with his voice, expression or gesture. When one reads him this way, some of Feynman's endearing charm and the gentle, self-effacing humor for which he is famous comes through. Here's a joke from pages 206-207: He is at Esalen in a hot bath with another man and a girl. The man begins to massage the girl's foot. He feels something in her big toe. He asks his instructor, "Is that the pituitary?" The girl says, "No, that's not the way it feels." Feynman injects, "You're a hell of a long way from the pituitary, man." And they both look at him. "I had blown my cover, you see--and she said, It's reflexology. So I closed my eyes and appeared to be meditating." Yes, Feynman is a long way from reflexology.

--Dennis Littrell, author of "The World Is Not as We Think It Is"
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book if you haven't read much Feynman, October 14, 1999
By A Customer
All but one of the 'shorts' in this book have previously been published - if you have extensively read Feynman (or even moderately) you'll learn/read nothing new about him.
If you are a new Feynman discoverer however it is a superb book and may well lead you on to wanting to get hold of his other works.
For me though, I was looking for new stuff and was a little disappointed although I did read the whole book and am pleased to have it in my collection.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A scientist's scientist, July 30, 2001
By 
Duwayne Anderson (Saint Helens, Oregon) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (Paperback)
Feynman seems to have something of a cult following, which is a shame, I think. He'd not approve of it. Reading his books, though, it's easy to understand how many people might come to almost worship the man. He was not only a remarkable scientist, he was accessible to the layman by virtue of his clear communication and clear language style. It was his accessibility, his style of communicating in the popular vernacular, and his passion for understanding and explaining things at their most basic level that gained him so much respect. While many academics were busy trying to impress their peers with 50-dollar words and technical mumbo jumbo, Feynman was explaining things with words like "jiggle."
While appreciating Feynman's dislike of cult figures, I count myself among the thousands of individuals that admire the man not only for his intelligence, but also for his earthly mannerisms. Here was a man who was not only very smart � he was, in a real sense, one of us; part of the mass of humanity. I found this book to be very engaging. In typical Feynman style it is both easy to read, and profoundly enlightening. These are the musings of a citizen scientist, curious intellectual, and genuine genius.
One of the stories I enjoyed most was Feynman's description of things his father taught him about birds. One day one of the other school kids asked Feynman to name a particular bird in the field. Feynman replied that he had no idea what the bird's name was, whereupon the kid jested that Feynman's dad had taught him nothing. But it was just the opposite. Feynman's dad had taught him lots about the bird � things about its behavior, color, etc. As Feynman recalls his father's lesson: "you know in all the languages you want to know what the name of that bird is and when you've finished with all that you'll know absolutely nothing whatsoever about the bird. You only know about humans in different places and what they call the bird." [See page 4]. This is a most profound observation that many people seem continually confused about: memorizing language-based facts (like the names of birds, lizards, planets, etc.) is not the same as studying those things, and understanding them.
Another of Feynman's beliefs was that understanding things at a mathematical and scientific level does not, and should not, destroy one's ability to appreciate the wonder of the world and universe we live in. In fact, Feynman argues just the opposite; that someone who understands science should find the world an even richer and more amazing place than someone who looks at it with unknowing eyes. This is also a theme in Richard Dawkins' book "Unweaving the Rainbow."
The book is replete with Feynman's musings about the nature of science, and a common thread is that the core of science is the freedom to doubt. He muses that he "believe[s] that one of the greatest dangers to modern society is the possible resurgence and expansion of the ideas of thought control; such as Hitler had, or Stalin in his time, or the Catholic religion in the Middle Ages, or the Chinese today." [See page 99]. He also speaks of the absolute need for full intellectual honesty in science: report all the data, and don't allow personal prejudices to filter it. Lay it all out, keep total commitment to truth, and let the chips fall where they fall.
One chapter describes his ideas regarding the conflict between science and religion. While other authors seem inclined to simply repeat the mantra "there is no fundamental problem between science and religion" Feynman points out that doubt is a foundation stone for science and a frequent taboo in religion. He also (correctly) points out that religion is composed of multiple parts, and that there is not a disagreement between the ethical parts of religion and science, but that a schism does exist between science and much of the mythological base found in religion.
It's not all about philosophy (which Feynman generally disliked). There are chapters that describe the ultimate energy use of computing machines, appeals for the development of nano technology, and Feynman's report on the Challenger disaster. There are also fun chapters, with Feynman describing some of his experiences while working at Los Alamos during development of the atomic bomb. Found throughout these stories are his contempt for figures of authority, and his ever-present need to question things, especially those things we take for granted.
In keeping with Feynman's advice, I resolved to find at least one thing in his book with which I disagreed. After all, Feynman would have wanted it that way. In the chapter that discusses science and religion, Feynman states "� it seems to me that there is no scientific evidence bearing on the Golden Rule." On the contrary, I think evolutionary pressure actually selects for "the Golden Rule," and I believe authors like Dawkins have shown convincingly that what looks like selflessness in some types of altruistic behavior is actually, from an evolutionary point of view, a selfish thing (it promotes the replication of genes responsible for that behavior).
Whether or not you agree with everything in the book is hardly the point. Feynman's point is that we should question and think about everything � including what he wrote. That's how you find things out. And if you've ever had the pleasure of finding things out, and then sitting back with hands clasped behind your head and a broad smile across your face, this book is for you.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great thoughts of a nobel laureate in physics, February 9, 2008
This review is from: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (Paperback)
Richard Feynman was a great physicist of the 20th Century. He was unconventional but had a way of making physics interesting to students and lay people alike. When I was an undergraduate at Stony Brook in 1969, I took freshman physics from Lamb and Fowler. They had their own notes for our reference but used Feyman's lectures as the course text. Because it lacked structure it was a difficult book (actually two volumes) to learn from. It clearly inspired our professors and many of Feynman's Cal Tech students as well. For me and most of my classmates at Stony Brook we found that buying a copy of the conventional text by Halliday and Resnick was necessary to get us through the course. In this collection of works Feynman has a discussion where he eplains the difficulty of teaching and motivating. He admits that he has not figured out how to do it. His father's approach to investigation worked well on his son but not his daughter. She wanted structure and repetition. He proposes trying many different approaches so as to reach as many students as possible.
Robbins has collected a number of interesting short articles,publications and interviews that show the type of person Feynman was and his dedication to physics. This came about for him through the pleasure that comes with discovering how things really work.

This is the common theme in the book. He discusses his experience at Los Alamos during the Manhattan project, mainly covering his dislike for the security and censorship that was part of this crucial phase in the development of the atomic bomb. I also enjoyed reading about his theories regarding how small computers may one day be. My favorite chapter is his frank and careful minority report on the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster.

If you have read and liked Feynman before, this will not disappoint you. It comes with a very interesting foreward by Freeman Dyson and an editor's introduction to prepare you for what is ahead.
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48 of 56 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars scraping the bottom of the feynmaniana barrel, July 16, 2003
By 
Robert J. Crawford (Balmette Talloires, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (Paperback)
This book is yet another posthumous compilation of Feynman's musings. With each successive book - starting from the wonderful transcriptions of Leighton, Surely You're Joking Mr. Feynman - they have been declining in quality for years. Well, this is a hodgepodge of paper scraps and even raw oral interviews that have been thrown together to exploit just about the last drop of these kinds of things, and I can say that I don't think the process should continue.
There are some amusing things in this book and some interesting details, but there really isn't anything special except for the fact that Feynman enjoys the personality cult associated with a zany physics genius. He was an original character and, in physics, a truly great thinker. But that doesn't make every last little thing that he ever said or scribbled down interesting, except to uncritical devotees who live with the fantasy that everything he said was better than worthwhile. Indeed, if you know about something in great depth he writes (well talks) about, his views appear as superficial as the rest of non-specialists on the subjects. Where he is truly interesting in on physics, mathematics, and science - and the overwhelming majority of what he produced on those subjects is already available.
I would not recommend this book, except as a source of Feynman trivia if that is your bag. Indeed, I had heard most of these things before - either in films about the man or from his earlier writings. As such, that makes this book the crassest attempt to commercially exploit the legacy of this great man yet again. If such a thing were possible, the editor should be ashamed.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Welcome, with some reservations...., July 8, 2001
By 
Rory Coker (Austin, TX USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (Paperback)
As a physics professor in the 1970s, I tried introducing my "liberal arts physics" students to Richard Feynman, via xerox copies of some of his writings, and via the filmed Messenger Lectures of a decade before, "The Character of Physical Law"--- by the way, why aren't these available today on video tape?
Now, 25 years later, there's a modest "boom" of Feynman material in print, by no means all worthy of being in that state (which is why Feynman kept a number of lecture transcripts tucked away forgotten in file folders) and one fears, after seeing "The Meaning of it All," that even Feynman's used kleenex and desk blotters are not safe from publication!
But this collection is welcome for gathering together many transcriptions of his famous talks from this era, the 1960s and 1970s, the best of which are "Los Alamos from Below," the deservedly legendary "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom," "What is Science?" and "Cargo Cult Science."
As a physicist and as one who had the pleasure of hearing Feynman lecture in person on a number of occasions, I had some reservations about the editing of this book, however. The book unwisely starts out with an interview from late in Feynman's life, in which he tells some of his favorite stories in a quite inarticulate way, and then edits out the same stories as they appear in far more comprehensible fashion in the later material (related two decades before). The editor himself seems singularly innocent of science in all its aspects, which results in some major howlers. For example, the speed of light in glass is about 75% of its speed in vacuum, far from "a fraction of a percent" slower than its vacuum speed (p.xii) and CP Invariance (p. 101) has no connection whatsoever to conservation of charge. The operator C, "charge conjugation," changes particles to antiparticles. And so on!
Some of the material presents Feynman strugging publicly with ideas, presentations and even grammar. By comparing the actual Messenger Lectures of 1965 with their published versions, you can see how carefully Feynman himself would edit such transcripts before publication. Without the touch of the master, "The Pleaure of Finding Things Out," an interview which opens the book and "The Relation of Science and Religion," which closes it, don't make a whole lot of sense! Feynman in person, no matter how much he might struggle to get a thought or concept stated to his satisfaction, would convey the successful outcome by body language and a triumphant tone of voice--- to see a transcript in cold print is to see a lot of rambling words with no clear focus, which is no service at all to Feynman, one of the princes of clear thinking!
Recommended with some serious reservations.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's still Richard Feynman to me - 4.5 stars, May 29, 2006
This review is from: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (Paperback)
This book has been siting close to my bed for a long while now, the main reason being the way the late professor Feynman (as it is stated somewhere in the book) looked at the things that mattered the most to him. As one of the most recongnizable names in the world of physics, you might wonder what the importance of his saying about politics or religion might be. To keep on the spirit of this long-time defendant of science (Feynman of course, not me) I'd ask you to grab/lend/buy yourself a copy of this book, so you can compare it with what is being said in the newspapers, radio and TV nowadays (and Internet and... ok, every mass media you can think about). For everyone who already knows Feynman this book will add little to your knowledge of the guy, but I still think it's nice to have this fine collection of talks, interviews and works in general in a single package. Nevertheless i felt that, despite the editor's effort, you'll find a bit of repetition (hence my 4.5 stars rating). But that's, as far as i can tell, the only thing that 'bothered' me. To give you a better idea on what's in the book let me number the chapters that sum it up (with a brief explanation):
1. The Pleasure of Finding Things Out
A varied collection of anecdotes, including the way his father used to teach him about the wonders of life, his working on the atomic bomb project, and the effective way of teaching science.
2. Computing Machines in the Future
One of the most complicated chapters of the book, for it requires a little understanding of computation. This is a talk professor Feynman gave in Japan speculating about how computers could be built and what would be actually done (the difference between the limits imposed by nature and those imposed by industry, ourselves in this case).
3. Los Alamos from Below
A lot of good stories from a man deeply involved in the making of the A-bomb, and clearly a very good insight of what life in Los Alamos was about. No need to know about quantum mechanics nor how radiactivity affects our bodies.
4. What is and What Should Be the Role of Scientific Culture in Modern Society
A talk he gave at the Galileo Symposium in Italy in 1964, in which he explains why he thinks science is irrelevant for the common people and talks about the importance of the freedom to doubt to advance society.
5. There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom
Another somehow complicated chapter, in which he discusses miniaturization and launches a pair of challenges that would open the door wide to the field of nanotechnology.
6. The Value of Science
A short chapter, in which he reminds us of the dangers of absolute certainty and the suppression of the freedom to doubt.
7. Richard P. Feynman's Minority Report to the Space Shuttle Chanllenger Inquiry
I haven't read this chapter thouroughly, but you can guess what it is about.
8. What Is Science?
His father influence in Feynman's own understanding of science (which is a remarkable feat considering he was just an ordinary salesman with a deep love of science, although with no formal education on it).
9. The Smartes Man in the World
An interview by Omni magazine about his work on quantum electrodynamics, the research that led him to winning the Nobel prize.
10. Cargo Cult Science: Some Remarks on Science, Pseudoscience, and Learning How to Not Fool Yourself
An address to the Caltech class of 1974, in which he explains why scientific integrity should be regarded as one of the most important aspects of any researcher and his work, stressing the necessity of not trying to fool the laymen.
11. It's as Simple as One, Two, Three
An insight into Feynman's mind's way of testing the validity of claims, even those coming from a psychologist who were supposed to know his stuff better than most non-psychologists.
12. Richard Feynman Builds a Universe
A brief recount of what are supposed to be Feynman's most important episodes in life.
13. The Relation of Science and Religion
The controversy that no scientist of this and the late century can avoid.
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