Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.00
  • Save: $3.24 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Plumed Serpent has been added to your Cart
Condition: :
Comment: Item in GOOD, clean condition with signs of normal wear including worn edges, bumped corners, and/or creased cover. Ships from Amazon same day as cleared payment! Amazon customer service and money back guarantee!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Plumed Serpent Paperback – June 2, 1992


See all 54 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Import
"Please retry"
$2.84
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.76
$5.98 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$0.99

"Ruby" by Cynthia Bond: An Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Selection
"Ruby" by Cynthia Bond: An Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Selection
The epic, unforgettable story of a man determined to protect the woman he loves from the town desperate to destroy her. Learn more
$14.76 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Plumed Serpent + Women in Love + Sons and Lovers (Wordsworth Classics) (Wadsworth Collection)
Price for all three: $24.21

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reissue edition (June 2, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679734937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679734932
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,008,604 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Lawrence writes on rebirth and reflects on the ambience of Mexico and New Mexico in this 1926 novel of a woman whose passions inspire her to flee an unexciting husband.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description

The Plumed Serpent, one of Lawrence's most vivid novels, is set in Mexico in the 1920s and centres on the religion of the ancient Aztecs. The Cambridge edition establishes for the first time a meticulously edited text based on the manuscript, typescript and proof material, nearly all of which survives. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Scott Henson on July 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
The critics focus on Lawrence's lifelong sexual themes and his colonial-era views on race, but the best part of this book, and the reason it's still important, is that it contains Lawrence's prescription for modern metaphysical ills -- a return to religion, not Christianity but a sort of new paganism which draws at its core on ideas from gnosticism and eastern mysticism. Lawrence thinks that Quetzalcoatl would embody this new paganism in Mexico, but he has Ramon suggest to Kate that, if she returns to Ireland, she should encourage the Irish to similarly reinvent the Celtic gods on the gnostic model. Ramon thinks every culture should revert to its old gods -- which he thinks are all expressions of the same, universal God -- because different "races," or to use more modern, politically correct terminology, different cultures understand the idea of "god" through their own unique experience, history and ways of thinking. Regardless of any other shortcomings, this is a fascinating, thoughtful approach, artfully presented.
I liked Lawrence's Quetzalcoatl hymns quite a bit, and thought they added immensely to the above-identified theme. They reminded me a great deal of some the Nag Hammadi manuscripts -- gnostic Christian teachings discovered in Egypt in the 1940s, and famously described by Elaine Pagels in The Gnostic Gospels. What's most amazing is the depth and scope of Lawrence's gnostic philosophy without having had access to those ancient Egyptian texts, which were not discovered until after the writer's death.
Those viewing this book through a purely feminist lens will dislike it; those who espouse identity politics will find themselves conflicted. But for anyone interested in a great writer's "practical" solution to the great spiritual dilemmas of the modern era, or who simply enjoys reading 400 pages of top-shelf prose, "The Plumed Serpent" is worth the time investment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Ron Silverman on December 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
One gets the impression that D.H. Lawrence's visit to Mexico in the 1920's was quite difficult; Mexico was rocked by political and social violence and even extremes of climate. Yet somehow, Lawrence has successfully managed to transform his experiences into a novel alive and vital. His characters are early 20th century spiritual seekers in a country that still has not been completely deadened by what Lawrence sees as the century's materialistic malaise. His spiritual ideas are much more profound than what can be found in most modern New Age manuals, and imbedded as they are in a realistic fiction, much more entertaining.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is one of those books that once you take the time to get familiar with, it will pull you along at a slow and sometimes painful pace. The honest and direct sensuality of the people, Kate's confusion between the love of life and the distaste for the common man, the marraige of religions, and the stuggle to become true men and women do offer the reader a wonderfly detailed story. I recommend this to anyone who feels they need a mental vacation for the social triviality of the modern day world. It is a book to help regain perspective.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 6, 2006
Format: Paperback
Myths may not have any credibility or even feasibility, but the truth is that every new one accrues its followers. "Do it ... And then you will know," from Cipriano's argument with Kate, could be seen as an attempt to convince the reader as well that myths are real and normal people believe in them, even the myth of Quetzalcoatl. This long-ago Aztec religion, revived for modern Mexico, ends up a contagious energy force that hits the country at the perfect time, spreading quickly and eroding the traditional Catholic foothold.

Lawrence has gone to great lengths to make the details of Ramon's religion convincing and thorough. The creative language of Ramon's speeches and hymns comes across as realistic, and alluring enough to draw its early followers from the community. Ramon feels that his country is dead, or dying, and that it needs a religion that will bring rebirth or revival to his people. Ramon's wavering respect for the Catholic Church combines with his desire for a "living" Mexico and leads him to bring back Quetzalcoatl, an ancient Aztec god. His religion gains quick favor with the people because of its contiguity with the fundamentals of Catholicism. Ramon tells the people that God has called Jesus and the Virgin Mary back to heaven and has told Quetzalcoatl, his new identity, to restore peace to the Mexican people. His use of religious terms (the Cross, Paradise, Morning Star, Saviour, Will of God, etc.) helps verify his claim and earn him a place in the societal construct. This Biblical language referencing the resurrection of Christ, "... when I am new man? I will roll away the stone," accomplishes the same effect as the Catholic terminology. This use of Biblical language culminates in Kate's response to Ramon's question "It is good, isn't it, Mistress?
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By L. Blumenthal VINE VOICE on May 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
I must agree with the other reviewers that this book has some wonderful writing. There are passages of description that simply dazzle. The scene in which heroine Kate first sees the gathering of the Men of Quetzalcoatl, where the beats of the drums seem to draw the soul from the earth, is absolutely mesmerizing.
Yet for every memorable scene there are pages and pages of wild romanticizing about native values, obscenely outdated musings about race, and odd sentiments about marriage and women. Unlike "Women in Love," this book doesn't present love in a very good light. Kate is seen as a woman torn between her need to be herself and her need to be subsumed by a man. And the answer is unclear at the end. I found her to be a sympathetic character despite her annoying quirks (if she hates Mexico so much, why doesn't she just leave?) and I felt the ending didn't show her growing or changing. I also felt that the other main characters (Ramon and Cipriano) became almost brutal by the book's end, and this development was not resolved in any satisfactory way.
I have to admit being profoundly disappointed by the ending, and by the bizarre theorizing about the soul of the "dark races." But, I had to keep remembering that this book was a product of the early twentieth century. And the writing is what still makes it masterful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Plumed Serpent
This item: The Plumed Serpent
Price: $18.00 $14.76
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com