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The Politics of Genocide Hardcover – June 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Monthly Review Press (June 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1583672133
  • ISBN-13: 978-1583672136
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,971,228 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Edward S. Herman is professor emeritus of finance at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania and has written extensively on economics, political economy, and the media. Among his books are Corporate Control, Corporate Power; The Real Terror Network; The Political Economy of Human Rights (with Noam Chomsky); and Manufacturing Consent (with Noam Chomsky).



David Peterson is an independent journalist and researcher based in Chicago.


More About the Author

Edward S. Herman is professor emeritus of finance at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania and has written extensively on economics, political economy, and the media. Among his books are Corporate Control, Corporate Power; The Real Terror Network; The Political Economy of Human Rights (with Noam Chomsky); and Manufacturing Consent (with Noam Chomsky). David Peterson is an independent journalist and researcher based in Chicago.

Customer Reviews

Dasht-e-Leili, a massacre of several thousand by the Northern Alliance, is included, but not the country as a whole.
Brett A. MccUlly
Another superb work in this is by the same author together with Noam Chomsky "Manufacturing Consent - The Political Economy of the Mass Media".
JC
This book may be pretty much correct on most topics, but it's not a gread source of information (it's a pretty slim book).
Brenden J. Vigus

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on July 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
There are few atrocities greater than genocide, but why does it so often go ignored? "The Politics of Genocide" delves into recent Genocides and why it has been used more often for political gain than anything else. This analysis asks many questions and provides many examples and discussion about various recent genocides from Darfur to Kosovo to even events like those that often happen in Israel's relations with Palestine. "The Politics of Genocide" is a fine addition to any political studies collection.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark Gudgel on July 19, 2014
Format: Paperback
This book, aptly named, is one of the most poorly researched and poorly sourced texts in the field of genocide studies today. The authors' comparisons and remarks in the chapter about Darfur make it evident that their knowledge about the world of genocide, as a retired professor of finance and an "independent researcher," respectively, is woefully limited. They repeatedly fall back upon an ill-conceived series of charts they have created, which, though mildly interesting, give little useful information. However, these flaws pale in comparison to the chapter on the Rwandan Genocide, which falls clearly into the category of genocide denial. A childish use of inflammatory language does little to mask a very one-sided and inaccurate examination of what took place in Rwanda in and around 1994. Poor, erroneous, and questionable sources are used to support the case for "double genocide," while more credible research is overlooked. What accurate statements are made by the authors are then grossly misinterpreted. They seem to rely upon a perceived (or hoped for) ignorance on the part of their readers. While the authors attempt to paint a picture in which black is white, and in which the RPF committed a genocide against the Hutu in 1994, a picture that utterly and completely disregards the role of the French, and which suggests an interest in Rwanda on the part of the United States that is a fantasy in the least, they give away their skewed revisionist agenda very early on. Genocide revisionism is a dangerous plague in our society; the shoddy scholarship of the authors of this book are guilty of the final stage of genocide: denial.
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14 of 21 people found the following review helpful By William Podmore on September 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
Edward Herman and David Peterson have written a superb study of the uses of the term `genocide'. Herman is Professor Emeritus of Finance at the University of Pennsylvania and Peterson is a journalist and researcher.

In 1973 Noam Chomsky and Herman wrote that the USA has "been the most important single instigator, administrator and moral and material sustainer of serious bloodbaths in the years that followed the Second World War." They cited the cases of the Philippines (1898-73), Thailand (1946-73), Palestine (1948-), Vietnam (1954-73), Central America (1954-), Indonesia (1965-69), Cambodia (1965-73), East Pakistan (1971) and Burundi (1972), More recently, Iraq (1990-), Rwanda (1994), the Democratic Republic of Congo [DRC] (1998-2007) and Afghanistan (2001-) have joined the grim list.

Herman and Peterson examine killings in Sudan, Yugoslavia, Rwanda and the DRC. They also study war crimes committed by US allies Israel, Croatia, the Northern Alliance in Afghanistan, Turkey, Indonesia, El Salvador and Guatemala.

They note that the International Criminal Court, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda all exclude the crime of aggression from their jurisdiction. (Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch likewise exclude aggression from their remit.)

When, in 1999, the Yugoslav government asked the International Criminal Court to issue an injunction against the NATO powers bombing it, the US government replied that it had `not consented to the Court's jurisdiction in this case, and absent such consent, the Court has no jurisdiction to proceed'. The Court agreed that it `cannot decide a dispute between States without the consent of those States to its jurisdiction'.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Brenden J. Vigus on October 16, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The work Herman did with Chomsky was very carefull and accurate. This book may be pretty much correct on most topics, but it's not a gread source of information (it's a pretty slim book). In regards to some topics they mention I'd recommend The Fateful Triangle, Pity the Nation, Defending the Holy Land, Political Economy of Human Rights vols 1 & 2, and Leave None to Tell the Story.

I have to give this one star because Herman and Peterson flatly deny a planned and executed extermination of Tutsi in Rwanda. Kagame indeed killed tens of thousands during this time; for the authors this isn't enough. In their mind, the majority of violence was exacted by the invading RLF, and the majority of the dead in the country were Hutu. Reading their responses to critiques of this position, I was absolutely disgusted. So much skirting! They talk at length about style, about authors they know... it's absolutely shameful. There is a literal mountain of first hand testimony relating to the '94 genocide. In fact the whole international community stood and watched on the ground and didn't intervene. H&P's evidence backing their assertion that this bulk of evidence is incorrect is breathtakingly thin. They have the statement of one general in the genocidal government and correspondence with his lawyer, and they mention that the main author of Leave None to Tell the Story worked for the U.S. in the past. Objectively, this doesn't do a damn thing to overturn that mountain of first-hand testimony. Honestly, H&P hung themselves out to dry with their section on Rwanda. Shame on them.
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