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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 2, 2011
323 pages, subject index, name index, footnotes including bibliography for each chapter, appendix with copies of such documents as "Hitler was Elijah." Charts and tables, including figures on religious and educational background of those who joined these extremist movements. The previous review might give you the idea that this was a shallow or sensationalistic book; I find it to be well-researched and level-headed. This is, in part, a "field guide" to the many extremist groups in Idaho, their ideological differences, their relationship to each other and to other political and religious groups.
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on July 4, 2015
Although written in the 1990s, this ethnography of right-wing extremists groups in Idaho remains relevant today. It provides an insightful, nonjudgmental analysis of how the cultural values of these groups - some violent, many nonviolent - are "of us". The rationale for their activities are quite American. They are "of us", as James Aho says. A must read for anyone interested in the ideological underpinnings of the right-wing.
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6 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on July 7, 1998
The Politics of Rightousness: Idaho Christian Patriotism by James Aho is certainly a well researched and well written book about an issue of supreme concern in our country. There are times, however, particularly in the first 150 pages of the book, during which Aho's subjects and points seem to be forgotten and/or spread too thin. In other parts of his book, he seems to base some of his premises on farfetched ideas and foundations. Albeit the foundations of many of the Identity ideals are farfetched within themselves. Regardless of these lulls in Aho's focus, I would strongly recommend this book to anybody who is interested in learning about these dark and mysterious cultural misfits.
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