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Product Details

  • Paperback: 308 pages
  • Publisher: Two Pigeons Press (June 17, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0991816137
  • ISBN-13: 978-0991816132
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,455,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I wrote my first novel, "Kimberly and the Seventh Grade Disaster", when I was thirteen years old. Good thing it never saw the light of day.

In the years since, I continued writing stories, earned a degree in creative writing from Concordia University, read a lot of books (some over and over, like Catcher in the Rye), watched a lot of movies, got married and became a step-mom. The Pool Theory is my first novel that strangers are allowed to read.

To read more about the book: www.thepooltheory.com
To read more about me: www.alexanazzaro.com


Customer Reviews

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~I felt as though there was no need for the questionnaire at the end of the book.
Amazon Customer
The relationships between characters isn't all that well developed, because of the strong one-sided point of view.
NJMcDD
I recommend this book to young adult readers since it gives thought to complex teenage issues.
Claudia liest

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tez Miller on July 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
Wow.

I request a lot of stuff on NetGalley, reeled in by the appealing summaries. Most times I DNF these books, but sometimes you strike it lucky: a novel from an author (and publisher) you've never heard of before, that knocks your socks off. Alexa Nazzaro's THE POOL THEORY is that book.

It's told from the point of view of tenth-grader Kye, whose voice and thoughts are completely and utterly believable. Most times when female authors write men, they're just not realistic (in my female opinion), but Kye totally is. The tone reminded me of the film JUNO, and not just because of the subject matter. The up-in-the-air ending will frustrate readers wanting closure, but I understand why the author chose it - because in life, you can't see the future. And I applaud any author with the guts to tell it like it is.

The characters watch a lot of '80s films, which felt like the author giving the characters her taste, but otherwise I was completely into THE POOL THEORY, and highly recommend it for fans of smart, honest, and awkward contemporary teen fiction. I'm definitely looking forward to whatever comes next from Alexa Nazzaro.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sandy @ Craving YA Reads on July 11, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Social issues spill over in this contemporary novel about a young boy who has to deal with an unplanned pregnancy.

So many questions came to mind when I was reading this book. How many times have teenagers have had unprotected sex? -raises hand- Or even adults? Let's not leave them out - even if this book is based on teenagers having unprotected sex. How many have believed in a theory that if they had sex a certain way or at a certain time it acted a birth control method? Or risked unprotected sex that could lead to a sexually-transmitted disease like HIV? 'The Pool Theory' addresses all these issues in one thought-provoking novel. Kye Preston believed in a 'Pool Theory'. Believed in it until Annie Cooper, a summer fling, turned up and announced she was pregnant and told him it was his.

The strength in this story comes in the fact that it was told in the male POV and we can get to see a teenage pregnancy through the eyes of the father, not the mother. Most books deal with the girl being pregnant and the boy who made her that way is vilified, especially if he doesn't support her the way he should. Kye's story is a good reminder that both sides of the pregnancy are affected. Kye had his own life ahead of him, an almost girlfriend, and a life. In a matter of moments, he was going through pregnancy, abortion and adoption issues. The only thing he's not going through is the physical changes. This happens all the time in real life.

I really think this book was written to make people, particularly teenagers, think about their attitudes towards girls and, yes, boys who find themselves in a situation that they never pictured themselves in. In fact, this book showed slut-shaming at its worst.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Misses T on July 10, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
I really enjoyed this book. Characters were developed and really pulled you into the story. I like that the book touched on a serious subject - definitely not a fluff read. This book's ending leaves things to the imagination.... i do hope there is a sequel. I would snatch it up in a heartbeat!
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By No Labels on February 3, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
First, I would like to express a wonderful job was done with the visuals of this work. The font was easy to read. No issues with formatting, spelling, grammar, or punctuation.

The Pool Theory explores quite a few issues, but the main ones that caught my attention were:
friendship
bullying
teenage pregnancy
teen violence

I applaud these topics being brought up, but was the narrative painted effectively? There were some factors which tainted the portrait.

Choppy and misplaced dialogue: I had to remind myself that Kye was fifteen because the dialogue that occurred-not just with him but with others in The Pool Theory-steered younger. I felt like I was watching kids in middle school having a conversation as opposed to high school. Also, some of the switches from kid language to foul language were abrupt, borderline extreme.

Likable vs. Unlikable component: I can honestly name more characters I disliked than liked in The Pool Theory. Kye, the main character, I felt sympathetic for, at first, but the more actions that were displayed, the more unfavorable he became in my eyes. The only character I liked consistently was Anthony

Reactionary factor: There were a couple of moments in the work where the reactions didn’t seem to really fit the events. One glaring opportunity was when teen violence reared its head in the work. The responsiveness of the characters gave off an ambiance of “oops, my bad” instead of any type of remorse or proper handling on this issue. Yet I was left wondering was this lack of attention intentional, to point out that it occurs every day so it’s “no big deal”? Either way, it just left me feeling a bit uneasy.
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By NJMcDD on February 3, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
At first I quite liked the down to earth voice of this novel, it reminded me somewhat of a modern day Catcher in the Rye; also reminiscent of the film Juno, only from the boys point of view. There is a lot of realistic teen speak, pranks and bitchiness, which again reinforces the youthful narrative tone. I enjoyed the fact that the boys are portrayed as being just as unpleasant as the girls. Some of the narrative is pacey, with very short chapters to heighten the sense of drama and suspense. However, there are scenes that are too long and a lot of the dialogue within them deals with quite mundane and boring subject matters, which does make the pace a little sluggish at times.

The relationships between characters isn't all that well developed, because of the strong one-sided point of view. Kye's horror at his predicament is shown through his physical reaction to it, which added to the authenticity of the story. Yet, for me there lacked an emotional response from Kye to his problems, which alienated me to the plight of the main character.

I did enjoy some of the scenes between Kye and his brother Adam. I thought they were written well with realistic and natural sounding dialogue. Adam is a character I really warmed to. He epitomises what we all want in a big brother, strong, confident and willing to help in a crisis. I also liked this brief description of his dad: "My dad walked in and stood between us. “Hey, hey, hey.” that was the toughest my dad ever got, like those three syllables were supposed to spell out every possible threat of violence and destruction."

The main character, Kye, is shown as being vulnerable and at first I did empathise with him despite his standoffish attitude.
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