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The Post-Racial Church: A Biblical Framework for Multiethnic Reconciliation Paperback – August 24, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Kregel Academic & Professional (August 24, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0825435862
  • ISBN-13: 978-0825435867
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #886,132 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Kenneth Mathews (PhD, University of Michigan) is Professor of Divinity at Beeson Divinity School, Birming- ham, Alabama, where he has taught Old Testament Studies and Biblical Interpretation for twenty years. Mathews’s major publications include the original publication of a Dead Sea Scroll, The Leviticus Scroll, a two- volume commentary on the book of Genesis, and a preaching commentary on Leviticus. He is currently under- taking a commentary on Joshua.

. Sydney Park (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is Assistant Professor of Divinity at Beeson Divinity School, Birmingham, Alabama where she teaches Biblical Interpretation and New Testament studies. She is the author of The Concept of Submission Within the Godhead and the Church in Philippians: An Exegetical and Theological Examination of the Concept of Submission in Philippians 2 and 3. Her interest in the biblical teaching of submission stems from the experiences of her cultural background as a Korean- American, atheistic and feminist beliefs during her college years, and her ensuing post-conversion struggle to understand the countercultural notion of submission in Scripture.

More About the Author

KENNETH A. MATHEWS (ThM, Dallas Theological Seminary; PhD, University of Michigan) is professor of divinity at Beeson Divinity School, Samford University, where he teaches Old Testament, Hebrew, and biblical hermeneutics. His noted publications include two commentaries on Genesis and (as coauthor) the Leviticus Scroll from the Dead Sea Scrolls.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Doug Hibbard VINE VOICE on January 2, 2012
Format: Paperback
Race still matters in America, despite many people's protests to the contrary. That we have a non-white President shows the array of possibility for all people in this country, but closer to home for many of us is the reality that we live in racial bubbles that do not readily pop. Instead, we take our bubbles out and push through the aisles of the grocery store hoping our bubbles don't get squished too hard against other bubbles.

Then, for many of us, we retreat into a bubble-safe zone on Sunday. It's called "church." While we can hang whatever explanations on that fact we'd like to, most Christians live in that reality. Most of us also recognize that something's not quite right there--racially isolated sinners worshiping God apart from each other when we know eternity will look very, very different from that.

How do we adjust for that? How do we change the reality that is into what it ought to be?

The first tendency may be to simply accept the way things are as the way things will be and not bother with change. The next tendency is to change the appearance, change the practice, without considering how or even why to make the changes.

Yet as Christians, we have to base our decisions on more than just the need to feel better about ourselves. We cannot excuse inaction, but feeling doesn't cut it. Our lives are supposed to be grounded in the Bible and led by the Spirit. it is the Spirit of God that is convicting us and bringing that unease about the status quo. We need to search the Scriptures to base our actions on the foundation of God's Word.

That is the express goal of Matthews & Park's The Post-Racial Church. They write to highlight the need for rekindling a passion for racial/ethnic reconciliation through Christ among His people.
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Format: Paperback
Kenneth A. Mathews (Old Testament) and M. Sydney Park (New Testament), professors at Beeson Divinity School, attempt in The Post-Racial Church to "better equip the church in answering why Christians claim that the gospel and the Christian church are the first and last best hope for peace in a racially diverse world" (25).

To help readers understand how churches can more faithfully reflect "the wonder of God's human kaleidoscope," they work their way through the arc of the Old and New Testaments to reveal God's plan for reconciliation. Reconciliation, they believe, "can only be fully and finally achieved by a Savior who redeems and transforms the human state" (57). Their call to racial/ethnic unity in the church is an unabashedly Biblical program. They write, "Genuine unity must be predicated upon a commitment to the Lord God, not based on anything or anyone else. Otherwise, the unity is circumstantial, which means that it is superficial and fragile" (72-73). They ground their call for ethnic unity in the Church firmly in Scripture.

Mathews writes the introduction and chapters 1-4 on the Old Testament, addressing God's design in creation, his covenant with Noah and then with Abram to bless all nations, as well as God's heart and provision for the immigrant among the people of Israel. Park traces the New Testament development of the theme of the inclusion of all people in God's covenant. She explores Jesus' stories concerning reconciliation, as well as how Biblical characters like James, Peter, and Paul came to grips with a deeper understanding of God's desire for trans-ethnic unity in the Church.
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