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The Power of Logic Hardcover – Unabridged, March 22, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0078038198 ISBN-10: 0078038197 Edition: 5th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 672 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages; 5 edition (March 22, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0078038197
  • ISBN-13: 978-0078038198
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,564 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lance Goebel on April 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The first word that comes to mind when attempting to summarize this book is "mediocre". The book teaches a basic understanding of formal logic, but spreads it out over some five hundred pages (that's excluding the answer key, index, etc) without going into greater detail about anything in particular - it's simply too much fluff.

What's good about it? Many of the example provided by the book are very entertaining to work through. I often found myself laughing out loud at the examples and I think teaching logic in such a way makes this book worthwhile.

This book explains the fundamental concepts within the subject of formal logic in a way that's entertaining, humourous, and easy to get through, that's where its value comes from. If you want a book that will make you laugh while teaching you about formal logic, this is the book for you. If you want something more dense but with less entertainment value I'd recommend Irving M. Copi's "Symbolic Logic", which is a much more concise (at about 150 pages) summary of the foundational principles of formal logic, or Mark Sainsbury's "Logical Forms: An Introduction to Philosophical Logic", which is an extremely thorough introduction to the topic.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Mirolli on February 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I had to buy this book for a logic course at my university. Like any student, I was less than thrilled to spend more money on textbooks. I promised myself this year that instead of letting them sit on my desk I would actually read them in order to get my money's worth. This is the first textbook that has made me laugh out loud at some of its examples. From Harry Potter, to Star Wars, to Transformers, the references in this book make you forget that you are actually learning by using examples that most readers are already familiar with. This book is definitely worth the read and I recommend it. I am a Computer Science major and just needed this book for a semester so I rented instead of buying. This book is very helpful in teaching the subject and will give many laughs along the way.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Doug Erlandson TOP 500 REVIEWER on February 15, 2013
Format: Hardcover
"The Power of Logic," which is now in its fifth edition, is undoubtedly one of the better college-level logic texts. It is relatively complete in that it covers the range of topics from informal fallacies and categorical syllogisms to propositional logic (which it calls "statement logic"), predicate logic, induction, and probability. It discusses all of these topics in an easy-to-understand style and provides many examples and exercises to help the student in grasping the material. In addition, an answer key at the back of the book provides the correct responses to selected exercise items.

Instructors familiar with Patrick Hurley's, "A Concise Introduction to Logic," will notice significant similarities between the two texts. Although there are some differences, "The Power of Logic" could almost be a clone of Hurley's classic introduction. However, most of the divergences are minor. For example, "The Power of Logic" uses an arrow rather than the "horseshoe" to indicate "material implication" and a bidirectional arrow rather than the triple bar for "material equivalence." This is hardly an earth-shattering difference. "The Power of Logic" also uses slightly different terms for the rules of implication and axioms of equivalence.

One difference where I find Hurley's volume superior is in their respective discussions of categorical propositions and syllogisms. Unlike Hurley's text, "The Power of Logic" does not introduce Venn Diagrams in its chapter discussing categorical propositions but only gets to them when discussing categorical syllogisms. Moreover, while the traditional square of opposition is introduced in the chapter on propositions, the introduction of the modern square doesn't come until the following chapter. I'm not sure I understand the motivation for this.
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