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The Power of Positive Deviance: How Unlikely Innovators Solve the World's Toughest Problems Hardcover – June 16, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (June 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1422110664
  • ISBN-13: 978-1422110669
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #176,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Richard Pascale is an associate fellow of Templeton College, Oxford University, and author or coauthor of numerous books, including Managing on the Edge, Surfing the Edge of Chaos, and The Art of Japanese Management. Jerry Sternin was the world's leading expert in the application of positive deviance as a tool for addressing social and behavioral change. Monique Sternin has been an equal partner in these efforts and now heads the Positive Deviance Institute at Tufts University

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Customer Reviews

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Would recommend to anyone from college students to professionals in the business world.
Cweav
The Sternins and Richard Pascale have done wonderful work finding realistic solutions to difficult problems, and this book present their efforts very well.
Mobster 94
It definitely allows for someone who is new to the idea to get an understanding of where it can be applied.
kanece

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
For those who are unfamiliar with the terms "outliers" and "positive deviance," the former refers to "an observation or phenomenon that is numerically distant from the rest of the data," an "extreme deviation from the mean." Malcolm Gladwell has written a book, Outliers: The Story of Success, in which he examines a number of individuals such as Bill Gates who become peak performers. As for "positive deviance," Richard Pasquale, Jerry Sternin, and Monique Sternin explain it as an awkward, oxymoronic term. "The concept is simple: look for outliers who succeed against all odds...The basic premise is this: (1) Solutions to seemingly intractable problems already exist, (2) they have been discovered by members of the community itself, and (3) these innovators (individual positive deviants) have succeeded even though they share the same constraints and barriers as others."

The co-authors acknowledge that the positive deviance process is not suitable for everything and suggest that "the process excels over most alternatives when addressing problems that "(1) are enmeshed in a complex social system, (2) require social and behavioral change, and (3) entail solutions that are rife with unforeseeable or unintended consequences." Also, this process should be at least considered when the given problems are viewed as "intractable" after prior solutions failed. Moreover, the process redirects attention from "what's wrong" to "what's right" - observable exceptions that succeed "against all odds."

I can personally attest that, on the basis of my extensive experience with corporate teams involved in process improvement initiatives (e.g. to reduce cycle time, improve first pass yield), the PD approach is almost always the best to take.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By M. Kayhoe on June 21, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I recommend this book without hesitation or limitation. The breadth of opportunity presented by positive deviance, as an idea, a mindset, and a methodology, is a bit staggering. Every profession or field can be affected - health care, economic development, organizational development, social activism, leadership development, politics, and so on.

It has already become a lens with which I think about and pursue my work. And it is an easy read, full of real world stories and examples.

Well done!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Michael V. Harper on August 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When charting a course, many of us are fond of saying "we don't know what we don't know." In this delightful book we are reminded that all too often in reality, "we don't know what we do know." Or, as Yogi said, "you can see a lot by looking." This is a book about just that: examining complex social systems, looking for unique positive behavior, coming to some level of understanding, and then propagating the better practice.

The book combs a lifetime of the most difficult kind of fieldwork by Jerry and Monique Sternin with a lifetime of teaching and writing by Richard Pascale to create a genuinely good book - one that is good on several levels. Leaders dealing with organizational change of the most difficult kind will find The Power of Positive Deviance to open up a world of tools that go often ignored in over structured change programs. But on an altogether different level it is a story book about remarkable case studies - childhood nutrition, female circumcision, deadly MRSA infections, and others - stories that are all about engagement, leadership, commitment and hope.

But it is not just a book about incredibly difficult problems; it is a book about how leaders can re-think their own organization by "re-looking." Easy to say and hard to do. The irony is that organizations spend enormous resources attacking negative deviance (as in "let's do a root cause analysis and fix the problem") but little or no effort looking for things that are "out of spec" in a positive direction. This is a book about how to do that - how to see what is happening, now to nurture it, and how to build a culture that embraces that kind of stimulus and change. For me that may have been the most powerful take-away: look for what is working - even better than you thought - figure out why and embrace it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Laurence Prusak on August 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While the title of this book may put off some potential readers of who have developed allergies to social science language, it is actually a very creative and innovative book about knowledge. The authors have taken a concept that is reasonably well known and applied it to some very diverse settings to show how it can be usefully applied. The concept in my (over) simplified view can be explained as "some people in your society or organization may already be working in new and more valuable ways and you should pay attention to them and maybe spread the news about what they are doing" This book is a wonderful and valuable read-it is a valuable contribution to the growing literature on the democratization of knowledge, within organizations and in the world at large. Highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover
Wow. Just wow. I picked this book up randomly, having no idea what it was about. And now I cannot put it down. After debating so many impossible issues with friends and colleagues, I feel that I've been enlightened to the cure-all. The book shows how Star Trek's Prime Directive truly is an empowering philosophy that will generate more results, more answers, more success than any aggressive, know-it-all approach.

I am seeing how this approach can apply to so many issues. I'm not done with the book, so maybe this is addressed later:
Healthcare: PD can be used to find answers from one hospital to another, but it can also be used on a patient level. Let's see HOW that small percentage of families are functioning and thriving without health insurance. Let's see HOW that small percentage of women are NOT having unwanted pregnancies.

Now I want to dive into PD regarding education. What happens if you get a group of young students together and empower THEM to create their own Living University? What if they attend a school of sorts every day with the same commitment and enthusiasm of the caretakers in rural Vietnam? What if our malnourished education system got a boost of greens and protein? Would our children go from complacent and bored to LIVELY and perhaps "naughty"? Would depression advance to enthusiasm? What would our world look like if PD was ingrained in children and used throughout their lives?

This book takes some of the world's most complex issues and inspires readers with a simple, reusable map to find answers, hope and empowerment.

Thank you for all your research and for taking the time to share it with the masses!
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