The 3 Power Values and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.95
  • Save: $10.28 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -Daily Deals-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Used Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The 3 Power Values: How Commitment, Integrity, and Transparency Clear the Roadblocks to Performance Hardcover – May 1, 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$22.67
$17.57 $1.88
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The 3 Power Values: How Commitment, Integrity, and Transparency Clear the Roadblocks to Performance + Conspiracy of Fools: A True Story
Price for both: $36.65

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (May 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1118101324
  • ISBN-13: 978-1118101322
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 0.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,627,575 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review




Q & A with David Gebler, author of The 3 Power Values

David Gebler
Why are so many business leaders reluctant to talk about corporate culture?
Corporate culture permeates every organization, influencing the behavior of every employee. And yet, because culture is so intangible, leaders are often hesitant to dive in to both understand it, and then tweak it so it works well. Many leaders really haven't focused on their ability to both measure and then manage their organization's culture.

In my experience over the past twenty years, most leaders:
  • Do not realize that their culture significantly hinders or supports performance and the implementation of strategies
  • Do not know whether their culture generates unacceptably high risks of unethical or illegal conduct
  • Do not see why a reorganization or acquisition is doomed to failure because leadership has failed to create a common culture, generating frustration that can lead to undesired behavior
In the book, you explain that three power values are essential to an organization's success. What are those values?
My work with companies over the past twenty years has shown me that three values--integrity, commitment, and transparency--stand out for their roles in fostering identification and community. I call these the power values because they can influence specific behaviors that will have a positive influence on an organization's culture. These are the behaviors that will push and nudge the elements that define the organization's culture, its goals, principles, and standards into alignment. The power values do not give you power over other people, but they give you the power to bring out the best in people.

By focusing on the specific behaviors that make up integrity, commitment, and transparency, you can transform the negative behaviors that impede effective performance into positive behaviors that support effective performance. Company culture becomes a measurable and manageable tool with which to rev up performance and reduce risk.

The three power values are powerful catalysts for another reason: they are already the personal values that your employees commonly hold. When these three power values are highly visible in an organization, they clarify its intentions and give employees a unifying sense of purpose and direction. Employees who share their principles, goals, and outlook--the essence of the power values--can let their guard down a bit. They can trust that they will be understood, that there will be fewer booby traps, and that their leaders and coworkers will generally act in a predictable way, consistent with their shared values.

What problems surface when these values are off kilter?
In positive corporate cultures, employees can feel good about themselves and their work (commitment), they can raise issues and freely ask questions (transparency), and they do not feel challenged by unfair or inconsistent work processes because people take personal responsibility for their actions and live up to their commitments (integrity). But when some of the elements of culture are out of alignment, frustrations arise. When the principles are not in alignment with the goals, employees disengage and feel a less vested interest in their work (lack of commitment). When goals move out of sync with standards, unfairness arises as managers and employees "do what they have to do" rather than what they have said they would do (lack of integrity). And when standards are out of alignment with values, employees see that the organization's actions are not consistent with its principles and it becomes very difficult to ask uncomfortable but important questions and ensure that the truth is heard (lack of transparency).

Are there ways to foster a positive corporate culture right from the start?
Organizational culture is not something that can be faked or implemented by leadership. The culture is simply the way the organization and its people conduct themselves. Organizations have cultures from their very beginning, even though many start-ups do not spend much time defining their culture when they are small and everyone knows one another.

When a culture goes bad it's not a sudden event but the result of slow erosion over time. Things begin to change. At the beginning it is small things: for example, a business decision made in the heat of the moment when the long-term impact of that urgent need was not something the decision-maker felt he or she could deal with at the time. However, leaders who understand the influential role organizational culture has in shaping behavior and performance will be mindful of early warning signs of trouble. Successful culture management means that leaders recognize the very first steps down the proverbial slippery slope, and take actions to address those issues when they are small.

But to do that, leadership must have a clear sense of what kind of culture is needed to achieve the organization's goals and what behaviors are needed to ensure that the desired culture is sustained. Successful leaders know that the small things do indeed matter, and that veering off course is not to be done without careful consideration of the impact of those decisions and a clear plan to right the ship.




Review

"a smart new business book for leaders" - Seattle PI

“David Gebler has written a much-needed and timely book. The 3 Power Values provides a simple framework for action that will help any organization reduce risks and achieve long-term sustainable value.”
—Shari Redstone, vice-chairman, CBS Corporation and Viacom, Inc.

“Just an excellent, excellent book. Gebler brings needed common sense to the often vague, unactionable, and fog-sculpting enterprise known as organizational effectiveness.”
—Charles H. Green, coauthor, The Trusted Advisor; founder and CEO,Trusted Advisor Associates

“An erudite and comprehensive account of why culture and values matter from a consultant who lives and breathes his métier.”
—Richard Barrett, chairman and founder, Barrett Values Centre; author, The New Leadership Paradigm

“Outstanding practical guidance on a difficult and crucially important issue for managers.”
—Joseph L. Badaracco, John Shad Professor of Business Ethics,Harvard Business School

“Drawing heavily on basic psychological and economic principles, The 3 Power Values is a must-read for leaders wishing to better understand their people, their organizations, and themselves. All of us benefit when individuals and organizations exercise commitment, integrity, and transparency.”
—Jennifer Robin, coauthor, The Great Workplace

“Illuminating, compelling, and actionable. A true contribution for leaders navigating the complex intersection of company performance, values, compliance, people, and organizational behavior.”
—Kim Rucker, senior vice president and general counsel, Avon Products, Inc.

“I have seen David Gebler put these powerful ideas into action, and they work.”
—Shira Goodman, executive vice president, human resources, Staples, Inc.

“Illuminating, compelling, and actionable. A true contribution for leaders navigating the complex intersection of company performance, values, compliance, people, and organizational behavior.”
—Kim Rucker, senior vice president and general counsel, Avon Products, Inc.

“A must-read. I have worked with David Gebler for over seven years, and with The 3 Power Values he is once again at the forefront of driving positive cultural change in organizations.”
—Vincent Brockman, executive vice president, general counsel, and chief ethics and compliance officer, Scotts Miracle-Gro Company

“David Gebler's book draws as much on his decades of hands-on experience working with companies on their ethical challenges as it does on his keen insight into the three values—commitment, integrity, and transparency—that drive any company's performance. It's essential reading for all managers striving to understand their corporate culture and create a high-performing organization.”
—Jeffrey Seglin, author, The Right Thing: Conscience, Profit, and Personal Responsibility in Today's Business

“The 3 Power Values is a must-read for every manager. Creating a culture of trust and commitment is crucial for any institution to survive long term. Yet sustaining cooperation internally and maintaining a reputation for trustworthiness is complex. The 3 Power Values is a clear and unique guide to creating and maintaining such a culture. It is simple without being simplistic, and convincing without being rigid and inflexible.”
—Tamar Frankel, professor of law, Boston University School of Law; author, Trust and Honesty: America's Business Culture at a Crossroad

“A breakthrough, commonsense primer for establishing effective corporate cultures to assist employees in avoiding costly and destructive ethical and legal lapses. A compelling read for corporate leaders in today's heavily regulated and overly litigious environment.”
—Harvey L. Pitt, CEO of global strategic business consultancy, Kalorama Partners; 26th Chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission


More About the Author

David Gebler has been helping organizations live their values for nearly 20 years. David advises global leaders on how to leverage their organization's culture: to create value, to save money, and to stay out of trouble.

David helps organizations see how their culture impacts performance. David and his team then develop strategies to reduce those risks by aligning the values of the organization with business goals. David creates training programs and leadership strategies targeted to the client's specific risk factors.

David is on the International Advisory Board of Suffolk University's Graduate Program in Ethics and Public Policy, where he co-teaches a course in Business Ethics. A frequent speaker and panelist, David has appeared on CNN, CNBC, Fox News, and WGBH, discussing topical ethics and corporate culture issues. His first book, Creating a Culture of Compliance (Ark Group Press) was released in January 2011. A business lawyer by training, David received his J.D. from the University of California in Davis. As an attorney in private practice with firms such as Proskauer and as corporate counsel for Gamma International, he gained extensive experience in both bank regulatory and software licensing issues. He worked in Israel for CBS Records International as director of business affairs and as a staff lawyer for El Al Israel Airlines.

David can be reached at david@davidgebler.com.

Related Media


Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nir Eisikovits on May 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book is a perfect text for any level business ethics course. It is compellingly and clearly written. One of the book's most important contributions is that it explains the centrality of "corporate culture" -- of what it means to have a company culture that promotes decency. The book also carefully and sympathetically articulates the all-too-human tendencies that undermine this kind of culture.The upshot is a book that makes a very strong case about why compliance-based approaches to guarantying good behavior in the commercial world are unsatisfactory.The book is outstanding both as the basis of a business ethics course or as a companion to a text that applies the classical (Utilitarian, Deontological, virtue-based) approaches.

Nir Eisikovits PhD, LLB
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Director, Graduate Program in Ethics and Public Policy
Suffolk University
Boston, MA
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
In Leading Change, James O'Toole suggests that most change initiatives either fail or fall far short of original expectations because of cultural resistance that results from what he so aptly characterizes as "the ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom." David Gebler agrees (as do I) and notes, "Classical social psychology has always had insights into how to create an effective and high-performing culture. There is plenty of information on this topic but not many strategies for organizing the data so a leader can develop a coherent plan."

In this book, Gebler offers a workable model of culture that can help his reader to change how people go about their work in the given organization. "I have learned that employees already embody the values needed to create a high-performing culture. Leaders do not have to create a culture. They just need to get out of the way of their people creating one naturally." This reminds me of what Keith Murnighan has in mind in Do Nothing! How to Stop Overmanaging and Become a Great Leader when emphatically recommending that leaders literally do less so that others can do more...and do it better as they "learn by doing" rather than by admonition or passive observation. "In other words," Murnighan suggests, "stop working and start leading."

Gebler has found that every organization has key levers that managers can use to influence the behaviors that drive culture. "Behaviors associated with three values - commitment, integrity, and transparency - remove the behavior-based roadblocks that keep people from being able to live their values at work. That's when corporate core values stop being a joke.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jordan Lurie on May 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover
As a lawyer who specializes in suing public companies for fraud, I was particularly intrigued and inspired by David Gebler's excellent book. His book reflects my own professional experience: that corporations, especially those that misbehave, have unique corporate cultures that drive their misconduct and that with appropriate guidance and values training a corporation's conduct can be redirected. Mr. Gebler's book is a must-read for anyone who engages, in any capacity, with corporate management.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By srsmink on April 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a well-written, straight forward, and compelling book about how improving company culture through, as the title says, "commitment, integrity, and transparency" will lead to better performing and more productive companies and more loyal work forces. The book's emphasis and teachings on how to maximize company values and align them with employee values are a must-read for anyone who is a company or business leader at any level or who aspires to be one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Phil Renaud on February 20, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Great read and applicable in every business....... Excellent business case examples of how Commitment, Integrity and Transparency impact not only our business lives but personal as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again