The President and the Assassin and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.00
  • Save: $3.65 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The President and the Ass... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Well-loved book, and therefore worn but intact. Possible writing and highlighting inside.100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century Paperback – June 18, 2013

85 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.35
$9.39 $4.19
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$578.78

Went the Day Well?: Witnessing Waterloo by David Crane
Books for History Buffs
Waterloo, told through interwoven narratives drawn from the diaries, letters, reminiscences, and great novels of participants and witnesses. Learn more | See related books
$14.35 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century + Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President + The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey
Price for all three: $34.24

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Miller, a correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and Reuters, faithfully captures the turbulent time at the turn of the 20th century when America faced discord from within and without, and war and an assassin altered America's history. President McKinley, then the most popular U.S. president since Lincoln, rose from humble beginnings in Ohio to become a Civil War hero and hardworking congressman, and as president determined to govern with a nonconfrontational style and maintain a peaceful foreign policy. In telling the stories of McKinley and his killer in alternating chapters, Miller uses sharp parallels between the president and his anarchist killer, Leon Czolgosz, a factory worker who lost his job in the crash of 1893 and was something of a loner who found an emotional outlet following the anarchist movement and activist Emma Goldman. Goldman's words inspired the depressed man to violence. With a smoldering labor crisis, foreign woes with Spain and Cuba, and a harsh media barrage, McKinley finally thought things were going his way until the fateful day he was shot. Miller's polished and vivid narrative of these complex, dissimilar men makes this piece of Americana appear fresh and unexpected. (June) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

“[A] panoramic tour de force . . . Miller has a good eye, trained by years of journalism, for telling details and enriching anecdotes.”—The Washington Independent Review of Books
 
“Even without the intrinsic draw of the 1901 presidential assassination that shapes its pages, Scott Miller’s The President and the Assassin [is] absorbing reading. . . . What makes the book compelling is [that] so many circumstances and events of the earlier time have parallels in our own.”—The Oregonian
 
“A marvelous work of history, wonderfully written.”—Fareed Zakaria, author of The Post-American World
 
“A real triumph.”—BookPage
 
“Fast-moving and richly detailed.”—The Buffalo News
 
“[A] compelling read.”—The Boston Globe
 
One of Newsweek’s 10 Must-Read Summer Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (June 18, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812979281
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812979282
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,702 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Scott Miller is the author of The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century.

As a correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and Reuters, Mr. Miller spent nearly two decades in Asia and Europe, reporting from more than twenty-five countries. He covered fields as varied as the Japanese economic collapse, the birth of a single European currency, and competitive speed knitting. His articles have also appeared in the Washington Post and the Far Eastern Economic Review, among others, and he has been a contributor to CNBC and Britain's Sky News. The President and the Assassin stems in part from several years of researching and writing about global trade.

Mr. Miller holds degrees in economics and communications and earned a Master of Philosophy in international relations from the University of Cambridge. He now lives in Seattle with his wife and two daughters. He enjoys mountain biking, back-country skiing, fly fishing and college football.

To find out more, visit his website: www.scottmillerbooks.com.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Paul Gelman on June 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
These were the words uttered by President McKinley's assassin immediately after he had shot the American president. Did he regret it? No. Before being executed, the assassin, Leon Czolgosz, cried out:" I killed the President for the good of the laboring people, the good people. I am not sorry for my crime but I am sorry I can't see my father".
The presidency of McKinley was the one when the modern American nation, economy and foreign policy were forged. These were the times when the USA conducted a war against the Spanish empire and acquired more territories, such as Hawaii, and Cuba was firmly under American control, while Taft was turning the Philippines into a peaceful colony during his watch as governor there. The American society was undergoing a deep and significant change from an agrarian one to an industrial one. This process meant, on the one hand, that some got very rich, and, on the other hand, millions of workers were conducting a battle of existence, performing the same mind-numbing tasks for 10 or even 16 hours a day. In fact, one observer described the situation of the masses as "one of unmitigated serfdom". New inventions and manufacturing techniques made it possible to produce more and more with fewer workers, and those who were lucky went on frequent strikes. Labor unions were still weak and the interests of the workers were mainly discussed and raised by the anarchists, whose number was spreading constantly. In other words, those desperate workers turned to violence, and the anarchists provided the fuel for it.
One of these frustrated people, who was a Polish immigrant and factory-worker, Leon Czolgosz, decided that president McKinley was focusing on making the rich richer.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Barat on August 12, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
The most remarkable thing about Miller's eminently readable discussion of the assassination of William McKinley by anarchist Leon Czolgosz in September 1901 is how little attention is paid to the deed itself. Miller is about more here than a "tick-tock" retelling of a sad event in American history; he places the assassination squarely in context by devoting the majority of the book to a survey of McKinley's highly consequential Presidency, the growth of the anarchist movement in the U.S., and the aimless Czolgosz' gradual absorption by the anarchist subculture. The Haymarket bombings and trial, the Cuban insurrection against Spain, the Spanish-American War, the career of Emma Goldman, and the establishment of an American empire are among the topics covered here, with chapters generally alternating between the McKinley material and the anarchist/Czolgosz matter. Once you get used to the book's structure, the narrative flows reasonably well. In intertwining the McKinley and anarchist threads, Miller in no way argues that Czolgosz -- who, while a shiftless loner, appeared to be eminently sane -- killed McKinley because of opposition to imperialism. However, the juxtaposition of the two stories leads the reader to wonder whether the social inequalities and unrest of the turn of the 20th century, coupled with what the American Left at the time thought was an unseemly grab for worldwide power by government and business working in harmony, provided the necessary spark for Czolgosz' solitary explosion.

I'm pleased to see that Miller resists the temptation to resort to common stereotypes and characterize McKinley as a cipher or a simple puppet of big business.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Rick Mitchell VINE VOICE on February 13, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book is jammed packed with information. "Sweeping" is one way to put it. It is actually two books. The first is a bio-history of McKinley and his term as president. The second is an account of the rise of anarchy (with labor unrest) in the last decades of the 19th century. The only way Mr. Miller puts the two together is by noting that McKinley's assassin attended some anarchist rallies. Although pro-labor, he wasn't even that active.

My biggest problem with the book is that Mr. Miller tracks McKinley's career and the Spanish-American War while at the same time tracking America's labor problems and the rise of anarchistic views in the country. He generally alternates chapters. Sounds like a good plan. However, when he was tracking the McKinley saga, he was always four to ten years ahead of the anarchy story. Not only did this make it difficult to follow, the reader is unable to conflate the two. Worse, it means he never traced McKinley's life and career in the context of the labor and anarchy movements. Amazingly, the reader never gets McKinley's views on these except to learn that he was pro-business.

The information in both accounts is excellent and well-presented. It was presenting them in one book without combining the two that brings this book down. It would have made two very good books instead of one disjointed tome.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 32 people found the following review helpful By G.I Gurdjieff TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
What attracted me to this book was that it seemed like one of those all-encompassing stories in the vein of Eric Larson which presents a slice of history as an all-encompassing story.
Author Scott Miller covers a lot of ground in this book in respect to not only looking at one very fatal act (the assasination of President William McKinley by anarchist Leon Cyglosz(sp?), but also digging into the backgrounds of both men. Miller's research is very thorough and he has managed to present a well-balanced account of both mens lives and insert them in respect to the emerging new century and the changes that were occurring in this country as well as the world. While this book manages to look at McKinley and his policies which was informative, it was probably the quasi-anonymous assasin that had an odd sort of appeal to this reader in the respect that he was really sort of an non-descript sort of man who got involved in the socialist movement. Since I knew less about anarchy and people like Emma Goldman and Albert Parson and events such as the Haymarket Riot, this added a lot to my general understanding of the period and put McKinley's assasination into a different perspective for me.
After reading this book, I felt as though I had picked up a substantial amount of knowledge regarding this incident and the era covered and will use it as a springboard for further investigation.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century
This item: The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century
Price: $14.35
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com