The Prize 1963 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(36) IMDb 6.8/10

Top writers, scientists and leaders converge annually on Stockholm to take part in the awarding of the prestigious Nobel Prizes. Paul Newman, as Andrew Craig, a hard-drinking author and Nobel winner for literature sets out to expose the hoax.

Starring:
Paul Newman, Elke Sommer
Runtime:
2 hours 15 minutes

The Prize

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Mystery
Director Mark Robson
Starring Paul Newman, Elke Sommer
Supporting actors Elke Sommer, Diane Baker, Micheline Presle, Gérard Oury, Sergio Fantoni, Kevin McCarthy, Leo G. Carroll, Sacha Pitoëff, Jacqueline Beer, John Wengraf, Don Dubbins, Virginia Christine, Rudolph Anders, Martine Bartlett, Karl Swenson, John Qualen, Ned Wever, Larry Adare
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Great Movie, fabulous actors, and plot that is guessable, but still a lot of fun to watch!
Mick
A great cast headed by Paul Newman, Elke Summer, Diane Baker, Kevin McCarthy, Leo G. Carroll and Edward G. Robinson in one of his later performances.
Dorothy N Giandelia
It's easy to tell who the bad guys are, but not so easy to figure out which of the two women is playing a double game.
C. O. DeRiemer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Dorothy N Giandelia on December 30, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
The Prize is a fast, humorous, suspense story set against the backdrop of the Nobel Prize and the Cold War. A great cast headed by Paul Newman, Elke Summer, Diane Baker, Kevin McCarthy, Leo G. Carroll and Edward G. Robinson in one of his later performances.
Paul Newman plays a once promising author, now writing mysteries under a assumed name, who receives the Nobel Prize for Literature. His curiousity leads him into many embarrassing and dangerous situations. No superhero, he uses his wits to survive.
Rarely seen on TV or mentioned in reviews of Newman's career, it is unexpected pleasure to watch. Set against the glories of Stockholm and in color, it is a feast for the armchair traveller. Get the popcorn ready and sit back and enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Josh bourne on November 29, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
After visiting Stockholm a few times I was very keen to see this film. The location is among the most beautiful in the world.
This film is almost 40 years old, however it still looks incredible.
Mark Robinson's direction is very Hitchcock, and in my opinion works better than Newmans and Hitchcocks very own "Torn Curtain" effort.
One of Newmans top ten if you ask me, it's just a shame that it doesn't recieve as much recognition as it deserves. Great fun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Terry Sunday TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 11, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I read many Irving Wallace novels in my high school and college years. From about 1963 until 1973, I eagerly devoured every word he wrote. I really enjoyed the depth and complexity of his novels. I still remember some of them fairly well, even though I only read most of them once. For example, "The Man," from 1964, tells the story of a black Congressman who assumes the office of President of the United States after freak accidents kill the President, Vice President and Speaker of the House. Imagine how that idea went over in the segregated, racially charged environment of the mid-1960s! "The Three Sirens," "The Seven Minutes" and "The Word" are other Wallace novels that I enjoyed immensely. But the first one of his books that I ever read, and the only one I re-read every 10 years or so, is "The Prize." An excellent story with memorable characters and exotic locales, it is also an armchair guide to the process of selecting Nobel Prize winners.

So how does this film version of "The Prize," from 1963, compare to the book, and is it worth seeing? The short answers, in my opinion, are "Very well" and "Emphatically yes." Starring Paul Newman, Elke Sommer, Edward G. Robinson, Diane Baker, Leo G. Carroll and Kevin McCarthy, "The Prize" is an excellent adaptation of the novel, and a riveting thriller in its own right. The movie is not quite as deep as the book, and a few of Mr. Wallace's characters don't make it to the screen, but it's still a great story that will hold your interest from start to finish.

Taking place in Stockholm in the dead of winter, the location shots often look so cold that they made me shiver. The performances are uniformly excellent.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer on January 26, 2007
Format: VHS Tape
For a Hitchcock knock-off, The Prize is not bad at all. There's an amusing situation (not Lincoln's nostril but the Nobel Prize ceremonies), scenic tours (not of the Riviera but of Stockholm), a gaunt killer (not an imported assassin who knows music but a waiter), a long, terrifying fall (not Madeleine Elster but Paul Newman), a supple blond ice queen (not Grace Kelly or Eva Marie Saint but Elke Sommer) and a dashing hero (not Cary Grant but Newman). And in an odd sort of way, it's Paul Newman who is as much a drawback to the movie as a plus. Please note that elements of the plot are discussed, but the set-up is all established in the first ten minutes of the movie.

Newman plays Andrew Craig, an American author who has run out of steam after two great books. He's been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature and has arrived in Stockholm, full of martinis and self-loathing, for the award ceremonies. Craig is on his way to becoming a lush. The Nobel committee has assigned him a keeper, Inger Anderson (Elke Sommer), to keep him out of trouble, away from the booze and to see that he minds his manners. She's not altogether successful. At the hotel, Craig meets Dr. Max Stratman (Edward G. Robinson), an émigré after WWII from Germany who is now an American citizen. Stratman is receiving the Nobel for physics. They chat and agree to meet for further discussion the next day. Craig also meets Stratman's niece, Emily Stratman (Diane Baker). Yet at the next morning's press briefing, where all the Nobel winners have gathered to meet reporters, Stratman acts as if he's never met Craig before. Only we know why; Max Stratman has been propositioned to defect to East Germany...and when he refused, he was abducted and replaced by his twin brother, Walter Stratman, from behind the Iron Curtain.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By mickey_one on October 20, 2011
Format: DVD
Elegant entertaining Cold War thriller with excellent cast standing on the shoulders of Hitchcock at times (nudist convention scene; Paul Newman falling off high rise in harbour etc.)
Original aspect ratio. Good print. No extras.
Recommended!

Film: 7.5/10
Picture quality 8/10
Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (orig.)
Run time (NTSC 60Hz): 2:14'55"
Chapter stops: 38
Audio: Engl.
ST: -
RC 1
Bonus: -
ASIN: B0052YDMZE
Studio: Warner Archive

DVD-R: will ONLY play on DVD player, NOT on PC drive or DVD recorder etc.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search