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The Promise of His Appearing: An Exposition of Second Peter Paperback – December 12, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 111 pages
  • Publisher: Canon Press (December 12, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591280265
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591280262
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #649,292 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Peter J. Leithart (Th.M., Westminster Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Cambridge University) is a Senior Fellow at New Saint Andrews College and is the pastor of Trinity Reformed Church in Moscow, Idaho. He is the author of numerous books on theology and biblical studies, including A House for My Name, A Son to Me, From Silence to Song, Against Christianity, and more, in addition to articles in journals such as Pro Ecclesia, Journal of Biblical Literature, and Westminster Theological Journal.

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Customer Reviews

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jacob on June 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
I came to the Reformed faith reading partial preterists. I saw it as the obvious alternative to dispensationalism. I then moved away from it for a while. Having been a fan of Leithart, I decided to read his commentary.

While he holds to the basic preterist position, he makes a few exciting mutations. Most partial preterists, when they get to this book, simply reassert that it took place in AD 70. Well and good, but that is not an argument. Leithart introduces what he calls "knock-out" arguments for partial preterism in 2 Peter. There are five of them. He sets the stage for saying that without a preterist understanding of 2 Peter, Peter's comments do not make sense.

Here is an example:
Peter says he wrote his letter (2 Peter) on the theme of the coming of Jesus, which he says was also a theme of his 1 letter (1 Peter). Since 1 Peter's teaching about the coming of Jesus highlights its imminence, 2 Peter must be dealing with the same looming event (14).

Btw, when all five arguments are seen together, they are quite compelling. Do not judge this argument standing alone.

Leithart also adds a Hebraic element to the interpretation. Peter's audience are dispersed Jews (and he quotes a plethora of passages showing how Peter's language directly mirrors exilic Jews in the OT). In short, AD 70 was not simply Rome destroying Jerusalem and that kind of conveniently looks like Matthew 24. No, it is a destruction of the Old Creation world. (Leithart then draws parallels showing how the temple symbolized the cosmos).

I really enjoyed it. Definite recommendation. However, it is not a key for sermon prep. It is more for eschatology than sermon, although it makes for good biblical theology.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Lohr on December 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book, short (not much over 100 pages) simple and straightforward, convinced me that Peter wrote II Peter about the coming destruction of Jerusalem. Leithart doesn't go into much exegetical detail on other topics, but this makes sense of the book overall, refuting (incidentally) some liberal who, thinking II Peter was written later, said it went in so many directions it could be used to say anything. With author readers and theme pretty much settled by this easy book, students of II Peter can go into other matters, though they may have to discard interpretations that don't fit into II Peter's original setting. This book isn't a detailed general commentary (I think Leithart has written some, though they're not among the books of his I've read), but it does well what it does.

7 Dec A.D. 2010
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TRH on September 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
Peter Leithart sets out in this book to offer a preterist interpretation of 2nd Peter. He does an extremely convincing job, going to deep detail to show the AD 70 application, it is very convincing. He maintains orthodoxy in the process. It's very convincing and I don't know how anybody can deny his solid exegesis. The book is filled with fascinating biblical study.

I came to this book unconvinced of the thesis and am now 80% convinced. I clearly can see the preteristic theme of the book, but am worried where it will leave us. It seems like Peter Leithart may push preterism to far. Don't get me wrong, I am a huge Peter Leithart fan, and he is not and never will be a full preterist. But it seems like the interpretation of assigning almost everything to AD 70 leaves us with very little else left.

I am going to continue to think about and study the thesis of this book and may change the review.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rylan M. on October 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
From the back cover:

"The book of Second Peter has long troubled biblical scholars and interpreters, who have disputed both its authorship and its claims about the imminent return of Christ. In this study Peter Leithart offers a preterist reading of the epistle, arguing that it describes first-century events rather than the end of history. At the same time, he maintains orthodoxy, avoiding hyper-preterism and affirming both the real future return of Christ and the epistle's authenticity. Leithart's accessible style and powerful arguments make this book a valuable addition to the discussion surrounding the Bible's apocalyptic prophecies."

This book is amazing! Highly-recommended!
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5 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Book Guy on July 28, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After years of study, I have come to the conclusion that, while partial preterism contains many valid points, it has the potential to present serious challenges to orthodoxy by slipping over into hyperpreterism. Most of those prominent teachers, from N.T. Wright to Hank Hanegraaff, who have advanced a preterist reading of NT apocalyptic are clearly orthodox in their views. If not handled carefully, a preterist interpretation can easily go too far and make a hash of the apocalyptic genre by forcing prosaic meanings into extraordinary language. Looking at the Apostolic Fathers makes clear that the apocalyptic texts in the NT were understood to refer to the Second Coming and Last Judgment as transcendent, supernatural events, either at the end of time or outside time in the eternal realm, never an intermediate judgment in history (see the Didache). While some emphasized the destruction of Jerusalem and the Second Temple as a sign of Jesus' vindication (see the Epistle of Barnabas), this was based on the explicit prophecies of this judgment, and not re-reading every apocalyptic text as referring solely and in its entirety to AD 70. Even the partial preterist view is dangerous, because once you view all of the NT apocalyptic texts this way (Olivet Discourse, 1 & 2 Thessalonians, 2 Peter, Revelation), there is nothing left to provide a scriptural basis for the Second Coming and Last Judgment. Therefore, on what basis do you assert these things? The hyperpreterists are more consistent in this. Leitharts's take on why their heretical readings should not be accepted once we radically re-read all of the NT apocalyptic texts is decidedly lackluster. This is especially true for 2 Peter - if this book does not describe the "end of the world," then nothing does.
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