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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, Heartbreaking and Unforgettable
I was fortunate enough to see this documentary at the IFC Cinema in New York City. If this didn't make it to your local indie house, here's your chance to own a piece of history. Buy this movie.

I'm a city-dweller and a city-lover, so the subject matter hit close to home, even if my home doesn't happen to be the city of St. Louis. The story of Pruitt-Igoe,...
Published on February 17, 2012 by Tom

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good documentary
In brief, here's what happened. A slum on the outskirts of downtown St. Louis was torn down and converted into a huge public housing project, some 33 11-story buildings on a large tract of land, to give them decent housing and in the expectation that the St. Louis population would continue to grow. Well, the suburbs around St. Louis grew, as the more affluent and white...
Published 6 months ago by Daniel A Goldman


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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, Heartbreaking and Unforgettable, February 17, 2012
This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
I was fortunate enough to see this documentary at the IFC Cinema in New York City. If this didn't make it to your local indie house, here's your chance to own a piece of history. Buy this movie.

I'm a city-dweller and a city-lover, so the subject matter hit close to home, even if my home doesn't happen to be the city of St. Louis. The story of Pruitt-Igoe, though, belongs to every American, as the film makes perfectly clear. It's a story about promises made to decent people in the hopeful years following WWII, and how those promises were broken. To the film's credit, no single factor or group of individuals is given blame for what went so terribly wrong. Rather, the film explores a complex series of circumstances which converged to create a tragedy which is epic in its scope (thus the "myth" of the title) and quintessentially American in its character.

If all this sounds horribly depressing, know that the film is redeemed by the words and images of the beautiful people who loved, really loved, Pruitt-Igoe in its halcyon days. Their spirit and fundamental goodness shine through every progression of this narrative, no matter how bleak or heartrending. It's these faces I took with me as I left the movie, and they stayed with me for days after.

The cinematography is crisp and vivid, the editing is pitch-perfect (the film's 80 or so minutes fly by) and the story is one I don't think I'll ever shake. Don't miss this one.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Public Housing Project Branded A National Tragedy: Issues That Are Still Quite Relevant And Timely, May 11, 2012
This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
Other than in the most casual of ways, I really knew very little about St Louis' Pruitt-Igoe public housing project. When built in 1956, it was seen as an exemplary model for making quality low income apartments available to those in need. The compound promised cleanliness and safety standards as well as modern conveniences that the disadvantaged didn't often have access to. It was a hope for the future to many. But over the next twenty years, Pruitt-Igoe became a national symbol for the failure of public housing. Held up as a cautionary tale, the ruination of Pruitt-Igoe forever damaged the reputation of public assistance programs and branded the residents as the cause of the decline. Chad Freidrichs' candid documentary, "The Pruitt-Igoe Myth," doesn't shy away from this unpleasantness but it does seek to place it into context. Pruitt-Igoe was merely a symptom of a much larger economic and political problem and its deterioration was far more complex than what has been reported.

I see three basic threads running through "The Pruitt-Igoe Myth." The bulk of the film is spent in contemporary interviews with those that lived or worked at Pruitt-Igoe. Attacking the notion that it was an ill-fated idea from the get-go, these residents really viewed Pruitt-Igoe as something quite special and magical. There was much joy and happiness before the horrors. Second, the film details the decline which it largely attributes to the evolution of the suburbs. The project was built foreseeing a growing city population when, in fact, the opposite was occurring. And lastly, the film documents the public denouncement of Pruitt-Igoe and its inhabitants due to elements of racism, segregation and disinterest. I credit Freidrichs with keeping things balanced, however. Everyone interviewed is quite open about the unsavory aspects in the later years, and many are willing to admit the resident culpability. Simply, though, the problem was much more layered than the media portrayed it.

The DVD has an interesting Bonus Feature (in addition to director commentary, more interview footage, and a site tour) in a 30 minute feature from 1969. Steve Carver's "More Than One Thing" is actually a profile of someone living within Pruitt-Igoe and it's interesting to see it up close and personal at that time. In the end, "The Pruitt-Igoe Myth" is an enlightening look at a beautiful idea that goes bad. It's both sad and disheartening, and the issues it raises are no less relevant today than they were then. It's a poignant reminder that it's still necessary to provide answers to societal issues that have not vanished, but have worsened, since the days of Pruitt-Igoe. KGHarris, 5/12.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Invaluable Insights for Architects/Urban Planners Involved in Affordable Housing, July 12, 2012
This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
Some months ago, I was working on a large scale housing scheme for a country in the Middle East. I was asked to present examples of successes and failures in such projects and immediately recalled images of the exploding buildings of the Pruitt Igoe project. Unfortunately, probably like most people who are aware of the PI "myth", I presented only part of the story. This DVD is an invaluable addition to our understanding of the complexities of such an undertaking.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It took me Home !!!!, December 19, 2012
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This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
It gave me a chance to see what others thought of their days of living in the Pruitt- Igoe. To me it was not an easy life it brought back some good times and some not so good times, but it was,what it was. I was very happy to pass this information on to my younger brother,he also enjoyed seeing the DVD. Thanks to Sylvester Brown for making this .
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The terminal moraine of mythology, October 22, 2012
This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
I have seen this documentary several times. The poetry of how this story is presented caught me off-guard. It is the voices of the tenants that play over and over in my mind that keeps me coming back to watch.

This documentary on the elements that contributed to the demise of the Pruitt-Igoe housing project presents the facts from both a scholarly as well as intensely human viewpoint. The skill with which the story is told is impressive. The facts of the story are presented simply and honestly. The use of urban historians in presenting the historical context in which the project failed was genius. That these two men were able to present the causes in terms the common person could understand is no small feat. Yet, they succeeded. Interspersed with the historians' comments we hear the stories of the tenants. Two, in particular, impressed me. One lady relates her memories of growing up in the project where life seemed imbued with magic. Her memories are filled with sunsets, snowy vistas and Christmas parties filled with beautiful lights. Another tenant relates the afternoon his brother got shot and how that event shaped his life. To hear of his mother's last act to her dying son brought tears to my eyes. These are but two of many stories related in the film that speak with a poetry that is profoundly moving.

This documentary also provokes a desire on the part of the viewer to discover that the architect of Pruitt-Igoe was the same person who designed the World Trade Center. To consider these two different buildings and how the buildings met their demise is nothing less than eerie. Also mentioned in this film is how, for some, Pruitt-Igoe marked the end of Modernism. I am not well-versed on this subject but do intend on studying it further.

If you are interested in intelligent, thought-provoking documentaries, this film is a must-see. I cannot praise it enough.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Calamity, Filled with Beauty & Misery, June 1, 2012
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This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
This is a wonderfully-written, lyrical documentary about the famed Pruitt-Igoe urban housing projects in Saint Louis, Missouri. I've seen this movie a number of times now, and I'm entranced by a few things: First, there is the smart, ultra-modern design of the buildings themselves, rendered by a world-famous architect. Second, there are some truly amazing people (former residents and scholars) featured in this film--probably because all people are special in their own way, if we give them our attention for even a moment. Next, there is the sadness endemic to the decay of the buildings, and people's abusive reactions to their state-sponsored housing--as well as the abuse meted out mechanically by society itself. There is real beauty in decay and destruction, and this movie shows that very well. I shed a tear or two each time I see it, but for a different reason each time. This is an honest glimpse of public housing, originally envisioned with the best of intentions, operated pragmatically with all kinds of flaws, and brought to its natural destructive conclusion.

Why not Five stars, then? Because I keep remembering Terence Davies' spectacular Of Time & The City, also available here. That film deconstructs public housing--with its flaws and decaying beauty--in Liverpool, England. It is another order of magnitude more impressive, poignant, and disturbing than The Pruitt-Igoe Myth. Be sure to see both works!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still Waiting For Something Better, October 23, 2013
This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
A man walks through an abandoned lot. Is this lot in Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland or any other major urban city? No, it’s in St. Louis, Missouri; however, the premise is the same. A structure was established in a major city that promised to bring change to its inhabitants and provide them with better lives, but the promise of a better life for many was broken. Instead of a structure that houses and provides basic resources for its’ residents, a vacant lot sits with forest-like wildlife, resemblances of streets, and rundown utilities’ structures. The Pruitt-Igoe Myth revisits a story that isn’t new to those that come from low income urban settlements. Despite all the shock and awe of the Pruitt-Igoe Myth, a story about what happened when the poor is abandoned is essential to urban planning and future generations because Pruitt-Igoe started a cycle the country doesn’t seem to be able to get out of.
At the time that the concept of building housing project in the city of St. Louis, St. Louis was the fourth largest city in the United States. St. Louis was going through this great economic boom, where businesses were coming in and people were coming to secure the jobs these businesses had to offer. The Pruitt-Igoe Housing Projects were built to accommodate the need of housing for this migration of workers that would be coming to acquire these jobs. However, the urban planners of St. Louis didn’t forecast changes in the economy or the views that many white Americans throughout several of the nation’s urban cities would have towards these new housing projects.
Chad Freidrichs, the director of the film, didn’t just interview various inhabitants of the infamous projects or those that just happened to have lived in St. Louis during the time of Pruitt-Igoe. Freidrichs went above and beyond in providing his viewers with actual footage from interviews that took place at the time construction. The benefit of that footage is an honest but an appropriate view of Americans, predominantly white, that felt the need to migrate towards suburban life in the 1950s. However, this trend hasn’t died in many of America’s cities.
From many of the interviews done during the 1950s from white residents of St. Louis, they complained about how their home values were going to go down or how it wasn’t “natural” for races and those of multiple income levels to coexist in the same community. America shares these values, and even from surveys taken during the demise of Pruitt-Igoe, the statistics of white living in predominantly white neighborhoods correspond to the views recorded in those interviews.
According to a study taken from 1970-1984 on the Percentage of PSID (Panel Study of Income Dynamics) Respondents, by race, living in different types of neighborhoods defined by racial composition and poverty status, white respondents experienced racially and economically homogenous neighborhood conditions. An overwhelming majority of white Americans live in neighborhoods that are neither poor nor black, and to further this opinion 89% live in areas that have fewer than 30% of the population identifying as black and less than 20% that are poor.
However, planners went along with building Pruitt-Igoe, despite knowing public opinion on the housing projects. The finished product included 33,11-story buildings on 57 acres with laundry rooms and garbage chutes. Surrounding the buildings were churches, a school, health center and other complexes that led to a well-rounded community. The documentary showcased how the opening of the housing complex was a ribbon cutting event, with people overjoyed to be living in Pruitt-Igoe. Videos of a diverse community, of African Americans and white Americans, appeared as a utopian atmosphere throughout the portion of the film that highlighted Pruitt-Igoe’s beginnings.
Obviously, Pruitt-Igoe’s harmonious environment went downhill extremely fast and at the end most of the buildings were boarded up because only 600 residents accompanied all of the buildings. There were several factors that contributed to Pruitt-Igoe’s demise, but overall the factor of just being abandoned by everyone that was “supposed” to help cancelled out things like, people moving to the suburbs or the demise of St. Louis’ economy. Pruitt-Igoe started a chain reaction effect, where housing projects in other cities faced the same dilemmas, such as Cabrini-Green in Chicago or the Glenny Drive Apartments in Buffalo, New York.
The Glenny Drive Apartments were built in a similar fashion as Pruit-Igoe, developed as a response to migration to Buffalo but due to the lack of federal funding, Glenny Drive wasn’t able to remain standing and saw its’ demolishment from 2009-2013, despite being over 60% abandoned by the 1970s. Cabrini-Green was built in stages, before Pruitt-Igoe, but the same concept of urban renewal was used to establish the additional housing structures that went up in the 1950s. Just like Pruitt-Igoe, citizens of Chicago, can speak of the hopes and dreams they had for the housing complex.
“Chicago Ave and Halsted, created more than just corner to stand on, your walls supported a society where I learned to read and jump double-dutch rope…” (Costello, 2011)
This quote came from an art project to commemorate the demolition of Cabrini-Green, which took place from 1994-2011. At the end of the documentary, during the resident reflections, many of the residents spoke of their childhood memories of the project. Just like with Cabrini-Green, despite all the overwhelming violence or building defects, it was where people called home. Through the demise of these urban renewal projects, these projects lead to generations of displaced poor African Americans who would never be able to obtain the dreams that were birthed when these housing projects were opened.
As stated earlier, the residents saw Pruitt-Igoe as this place for change, and something that is striking about the documentary is the residents-led campaign that took place to fix their crumbling housing projects during the late 1960s. Before its’ demolishment, a wave of Black empowerment swept through America, from Martin Luther King Jr, Huey P. Newton or Malcolm X, the late 1960s created a climate for African Americans to fight for rights. As if it was a dream, there was a time where there were protests and sit-ins to combat the deplorable conditions that the products of urban renewal were forced to tolerate. Many of these efforts actually worked, and it was if Pruitt-Igoe and other housing projects could be saved.
The Pruitt-Igoe housing project met its’ demolishment in 1972. The sentiments were similar to that of other housing projects, where some were glad to see it fall, and others spoke of the good times, and what it really meant to people. These sentiments quickly turned into anger over the current state of Pruitt-Igoe, as it just sits there on 57 acres growing unruly weeds and protected by guard dogs. Many of the residents feel like the homes could have stayed since many are no better off than when the homes came down.
"The generation of African-American children raised during the civil rights era has made virtually no advancement out of the nation's poorest neighborhoods," expresses sociologist Patrick Sharkey in an article written about death of Martin Luther King’s dream in a Chicago Reader dedicated to celebrating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. (Borgia, 2013) One of the disadvantages of the documentary is that it could’ve been longer to explain the current plight of Pruitt-Igoe residents. From information obtained through various websites, St. Louis’ population further declined after many of its’ residents left for the suburbs. Jobs froze up, and new forms of advancing underserved communities never happened.
What Sharkey expresses is just one quote from an entire book on the era of where Pruitt-Igoe and other housing projects strived then later declined. The entire Chicago Reader article is an enormous list of depressing facts on how nothing has changed for African Americans in Chicago and other major cities. Truly the hopes and dreams of these residents died with the demolishment of these buildings, and progress stalled.
The Pruitt-Igoe Myth should be mandatory for anyone that is trying to start a movement of changing housing projects and other low-income housing areas into the gems they are supposed to be. Hopefully, in years to come, Freidrichs does more documentaries about other housing projects in America or even a documentary of the aftermath. Freidrichs could have usually overwhelmed viewers with the depressing stats of Pruitt-Igoe, but the documentary leaves you with an education on how things can horribly wrong how to fix them. Despite the dreams of starting a new life and progressing, many of the residents of Pruitt-Igoe weren’t ignorant to the world around, as the urban planners that designed the complex were. To the very end, the residents of Pruitt-Igoe tried to make the housing projects succeed. Sure they fail short but the story of it, can hopefully get enough people rattled to want to fix the problems that came from these structures.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Pruitt-Igoe Myth, October 23, 2013
This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
The Pruitt- Igoe Blame Game

After the First World War, many sharecroppers and tenant farmers from the South migrated to the North in search of jobs. "The only place they were welcome was the slums" (The Pruitt-Igoe Myth). After poverty and crime dominated the slums, St. Louis was in search of a new solution to the low income-housing problem. After much deliberation, the government of St. Louis decided to demolish the slums and rebuild. On 57 acres, there would be a public housing project built, which would include 33 high rises, plenty of open space and parking lots. These buildings would have a set rent and low-income families would be invited to move into the new settlement. The project was intended to solve the problem of the slums, but multiple, new problems arose from the construction of Pruitt-Igoe, which ultimately led to its demise and demolishment in 1976.
This left many individuals in need of an explanation and some one to blame. The director, Chad Freidrichs, collects all the information from documents and interviews and provides all the evidence, which allows the viewer to create their own opinion on who was truly at fault for this massive failure in St. Louis.
Many believe the government was the most at fault. The goal was to build Pruitt-Igoe and the mentality behind it was that "it was a cure for a disease. They would rise above the slums, lift people out of poverty. They would thrive and the city would prosper" (The Pruitt-Igoe Myth). It was a valuable proposal, but the execution of the plan was unsuccessful. Once the establishment was built, families were invited to live there, under one condition; their father could not live with them. Through out the documentary, many former residents of Pruitt- Igoe recall their memories from there, where one remembers, "no abled bodied man could live there" and how hard it was for her family to live separated from their father. There would be random inspections to make sure that there were no males and that there were no TV or phones. One resident recalls that these restrictions created an "environment to feel isolated and restricted" (The Pruitt-Igoe Myth).
The director's decision to incorporate primary sources such as former residents significantly increased his effectiveness of uncovering the truth. The presentation of the memories really helps the viewer get a better understanding of the reality that occurred at Pruitt- Igoe. The former residents that are interviewed to provide their thoughts on the situation were children back when the establishment was created and while they resided there. The best source to use is a primary one, but the interviewees in the documentary were too young to truly understand what was happening around them so therefore, their ideas and thoughts on Pruitt- Igoe can be contrasting compared to an older former resident's opinions, which the director did not include.
It is very important that the director included the former resident's interviews, but there was a lack of outside opinion. Sometimes, looking from the outside, in can provide an alternative, beneficial view. The director could have included government official interviews and possibly the views of low-income families who did not live in the establishment.
The other side of the blame game was that the residents of Pruitt- Igoe were at fault for the failure of it. The director included the stories of families whose loved ones were killed due to gang crime, but also the interviews of police officers that were constantly called to monitor the territory. In this part, the director was able to take into consideration both opposing sides of the situation. This made the argument interesting and well assembled which all leads to a valuable presentation.
The director presented the facts and left the viewer to decide on their own and to generate their opinion on whom to blame for the Pruitt-Igoe failure. Although numerous encounters were recalled and a lot of data presented, there was a bias towards the idea that it is not possible to only blame one individual. There were miniature proposals that specifically suggested that the architect could be blamed or more generally that America's public housing system was problematic. The director's decision to present all the information, and not hold any certain aspect back proves that it is very difficult for the director himself, to declare the one at fault. Overall, the effectiveness of the documentary was successful. It highlighted a huge problem in the American housing system. St. Louis is not the only one with failed public housing projects. Chicago had a very difficult time with its projects as well. This is a national problem that should be dealt with at a national level rather than city-by-city. The problem will persist if a solution is not created soon, and many more generations will suffer from failures like Pruitt-Igoe.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exceeded already high expectations, May 21, 2012
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This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
I bought the Pruitt-Igoe Myth with high expectations after reading several fantastic reviews. The actual film met, and then greatly exceeded, those expectations. What I expected was a film that explained the formation, life, decline, and destruction of the Pruitt-Igoe housing development. What I got was an explanation of the history of the housing development, and then examples of urban social problems as a whole. Many of the big urban social problems addressed in urban sociology classes and textbooks are covered here. Pruitt-Igoe serves as an example of what happens when hyper-segregation is combined with a crashing economy, rapid suburbanization, and a declining tax base. It explains how limited life chances can lead to self-defeating adaptations, such as crime and violence. Although this documentary focuses on a very specific case, it really reflects the social problems found in the ghettos of every major metropolitan area in the US.

Beyond scope, the documentary is also excellent in content. There is a nice balance of current interviews and archival footage. The film is also well-balanced between academic analysis and the experiences of actual residents. The academics interviewed are not overly dry, and the residents don't portray themselves as martyrs. They are pretty honest about where they screwed up, but they also don't take too much blame. All in all, this is an excellent film, and you really can't go wrong by watching/buying it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good documentary, February 22, 2014
By 
Daniel A Goldman (Seattle, WA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (DVD)
In brief, here's what happened. A slum on the outskirts of downtown St. Louis was torn down and converted into a huge public housing project, some 33 11-story buildings on a large tract of land, to give them decent housing and in the expectation that the St. Louis population would continue to grow. Well, the suburbs around St. Louis grew, as the more affluent and white moved out of the city, but the population of St. Louis shrank. Those leaving were racist in that they did not want to live around blacks, but also just wanted to live somewhere with lower crime and a nicer environment.

Initially there was great hope at the project, as it was much nicer than the previous slum. But the project deteriorated (apparently pretty soon), as gangs moved in, windows were broken, elevators stopped working, garbage accumulated, etc. Money had not really been allocated for upkeep. Perhaps the residents should have done more upkeep themselves, but it did not work out that way. Eventually it turned into a crisis situation, efforts to "fix" the situation did not work, and the project was demolished in 1976.

The DVD is well produced and filmed. It's interesting to watch.

However, I felt the DVD is somewhat disingenuous, and should have been more direct and objective. It uses the word "Myth" in the title, but is rather vague about exactly what the "Myth" was. The DVD back label says there was a "myth of failure". Well, it WAS a failure, so there is a kind of logical disconnect going on here. I think the subtext, never stated, was that the "myth" was that the residents were responsible for the failure of the housing project. Well, they lived there, so those families were at least partially responsible, perhaps mostly responsible. According to the DVD, the residents were mostly single moms, apparently at last partly as a result of a policy that able-bodied men could not live in the project. I doubt the single moms were out breaking windows. It was probably their kids with time on their hands and the urge to vandalize. On the other hand, one of the moms recounts how great it was that late at night they would crank up the music very loud and have a dance party in the hallways. What kind of environment for living is that? American society has certainly dealt poor people and blacks a poor hand. The only realistic way out is education, but the impression from the film is there was not much emphasis on that. By heavily relying on interviews, the DVD is necessarily rather subjective. I think the reality of what happened in those projects is much more complex than that portrayed in the selective interviews, probably much more heart-breaking. It's a tragic story, and I feel sorry for the residents and all they suffered. There was a lot of hope and good intentions on the part of the residents, and a sad end.

By the way, the back of the DVD cover says this failure has something to do with Modernist architecture getting a bad reputation. I looked around for pictures of Modernist architecture. All the pictures I saw were very different from the Pruitt-Igoe project. I found the project to more resemble some apartment block built in Stalinist Russia, very monolithic and depressing. Whatever one labels the project, it was ugly.

The good part of the DVD is that there are many interviews with residents and various other people. But what about those who did all the destruction and vandalism? Of course, they are not going to be interviewed. But it seems to me that a good part of the real story is missing. The only way out of poverty is education and a good job. Sticking a bunch of single, poorly educated moms into blocks of depressing high rise apartments hardly seems a recipe for success. There is no easy answer to poverty. This DVD more or less documents one attempt.
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The Pruitt-Igoe Myth
The Pruitt-Igoe Myth by Chad Freidrichs (DVD - 2012)
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