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The Public Enemy


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Product Details

  • Actors: James Cagney, Jean Harlow
  • Directors: William Wellman
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Closed-captioned, Color, Full Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: January 25, 2005
  • Run Time: 82 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0006HBV2S
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #63,757 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Public Enemy" on IMDb

Special Features

Audio Commentary: Commentary by film historian Robert Sklar Featurette: New featurette Beer and Blood: Enemies of the Public Other: Leonard Maltin hosts Warner Night at the Movies with newsreel, comedy short The Eyes Have It, cartoon Smile, Darn Ya, Smile, and theatrical trailers 1854 rerelease forewardAudio Commentary: Commentary by film historian Robert Sklar Featurette: New featurette Beer and Blood: Enemies of the Public Other: Leonard Maltin hosts Warner Night at the Movies with newsreel, comedy short The Eyes Have It, cartoon Smile, Darn Ya, Smile, and theatrical trailers 1854 rerelease forewardAudio Commentary: Commentary by film historian Robert Sklar Featurette: New featurette Beer and Blood: Enemies of the Public Other: Leonard Maltin hosts Warner Night at the Movies with newsreel, comedy short The Eyes Have It, cartoon Smile, Darn Ya, Smile, and theatrical trailers 1854 rerelease foreward

Editorial Reviews

Public Enemy, The (DVD)

Customer Reviews

If you enjoy gangster movies, here's one of the best.
Alex Udvary
Concise and thorough, with everything you need to know, along with things you never even considered.
M J Heilbron Jr.
James Cagney has always been my great favorite and this seminal performance is nonpareil.
Margaret C. Farrell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By M J Heilbron Jr. VINE VOICE on February 27, 2005
Format: DVD
What a terrific film THIS is!

William Wellman's "Public Enemy" is a tour-de-force performance by James Cagney, wrapped within some elegant direction and supported by a simple but effective screenplay.

First, Mr. Cagney is clearly lightyears ahead of everyone else on the screen in terms of acting style, technique and ability. The quote I use in the title of my review comes from Mr. Scorsese, who screened this film prior to beginning "The Aviator" for several members of the cast and crew. One young actor noted that it appeared that modern screen acting began with Cagney's performance, and that actor could not have been more correct. It's almost obvious in retrospect.

Second, Wellman's direction I didn't notice at first, until viewing the documentary after the film. Then I realized how artful and creative it was, especially considering it was made in 1931. His in-frame composition is eye-catching. The manner in which he consistently shows the most violent events just out of frame, or just out of sight of the viewer, adds tremendously to the gravity and drama of each event. Things like the music...here's an extraordinarily clever use of source music...the soundtrack comes from things ON the screen. A piano player, a radio, a 78 RPM disc...again, I didn't pick up on this until I saw the documentary.

Let me get to that documentary right now. Warner's makes awesome discs, and the care they've put into these Gangster Classics is to be lauded. The "Night At The Movies" is no gimmick. Putting trailers, shorts, cartoons and newsreels before the film doesn't merely re-create the environment of a movie theater back then. The elements are selected to provide context for the film you are about to see. They make the movie better.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Steven Hellerstedt on March 30, 2005
Format: DVD
THE PUBLIC ENEMY was James Cagney's first starring vehicle. Not only was it the first movie to push a grapefruit in Mae Clarke's startled kisser, it was the movie that propelled Cagney to stardom. It's a gangster film that tells the story of the meteoric rise and early fall of young street punk Tom Powers.
THE PUBLIC ENEMY opens with a quasi-documentary montage of shots of Chicago circa 1909, taking the viewer from the els to the stockyards to the opening sequence of the movie proper - a Salvation Army band marching in front of a saloon, a brewery, past the movie's two heroes as young boys - young boys sneaking a drink from the pail of beer they're bringing to someone, somewhere.
Director William Wellman built this one, and built it good. Interesting camera placement and movement and some very well edited scenes - the heisting of the fur warehouse scene is a case in point, one of a number of scenes that averts its eyes when the bullets splat flesh and, somehow, makes the violence all that more real. Wellman went to some length showing us the conditions in which gangsterism takes seed and flourishes. Starting with the obligatory opening "We must stamp out the scourge of gangsterism" title card, Wellman blames economic hardship, a lack of an authority figure at home (Pa Powers is around for one strapping the unruly brat scene before the movie knocks him off), and a doting mother seem the main culprits, in roughly that order.
Of course, it helps if you don't glamorize those you condemn. Keeps the censors off your back. Even though the charismatic Cagney doesn't paint a particularly sympathetic portrait of young thug Tom Powers, he IS the charismatic James Cagney. His anti-hero grows rich defying the unpopular prohibition act.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Thug's Ma on November 23, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
James Cagney reached the pinnacle of acting success in this 1931 pre-Code gangster thriller.
As Tom Powers, Cagney comes off as pugnacious, cocky, sexy and must be billed as one of the most misogynistic characters ever. (I'm female, and I still find his squashing of the grapefruit in Mae Clarke's surprised maw a riot.) With a certain comedic flair, as a bad guy who thinks he is good, Cagney is endearing as one one of the first and best of Hollywood's bad boys.
Reviewers, however, focus too much on what is now classically referred to as "the grapefruit episode." Instead, "Public Enemy" has to be watched for what I call "The Death of Putty Nose" episode where Tom murders Putty, a bad guy who had done him wrong. Putty begs for reprieve, then tries to endear Tom to him by serenading him at the piano with a song from Tom's childhood. Putty Nose nervously looks back at Cagney standing behind him, who smiles beatifically upon him in response. When Putty turns back to his playing, Cag shoots him in the back, in mid verse. The Cagney character then strides out, never looking back, and reminds his gangster pal that "I guess I'll call Gwen," his gal. He has no sense of remorse or conscience. It is hilarious because Cag is so baaad, and it is chilling because of his ferocity. Importantly, you never see the shooting take place. It happens off camera, which is even for evocative. I am one who believes that far too much gratuitous violence, swearing and nudity takes place on screen. Cagney didn't need it; he was more than effective without it -- even if it had been allowed in 1931.
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