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The Pursuit of Happiness: Discovering the Pathway to Fulfillment, Well-Being, and Enduring Personal Joy Paperback – June 1, 1993


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The Pursuit of Happiness: Discovering the Pathway to Fulfillment, Well-Being, and Enduring Personal Joy + Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment + The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Reprint edition (June 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380715228
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380715220
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #229,294 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David G. Myers, the John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology at Michigan's Hope College, is the author of fifteen books, and articles in dozens of periodicals, from Science and Scientific American to The Christian Century and Christianity Today. He serves on the National Marriage Project advisory board. Myers has been married for forty-two years and is the father of three adult children.


More About the Author

David G. Myers, Psychology of Psychology at Michigan's Hope College, is the author of seventeen books, and of articles in three dozen academic periodicals, from Science to the American Psychologist, and in four dozen magazines, from Scientific American to The Christian Century. For more information and free resources visit davidmyers.org.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 19 customer reviews
I realized how happy I am.
Robbin Na
A great range of information is conveyed in a very organized, clear style.
Kristina Russell
This book proved to be an extremely interesting read.
"coondog"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Terry Vermeylen on March 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best books on the subject of happiness. It is a serious book written based on fact (backed up by research) and not fluff. When I say fluff I'm referring to all those books with the authors personal claim to 100 ways to happiness. In this book the bibliography is 40 pages alone, with about 520 books or articles used as reference. 520! You can see that there has been a great deal of hard-core research done.
Other books tell you to picture your dreams or hug your neighbor. Not this one. David backs up all his arguments with numerous studies that have been performed in recent years.
An early chapter on wealth and well being contains information from at least ten studies. One study covers sixteen countries and involves responses from 170, 000 participants. I'm happy to see that David has looked at happiness within the influence of a culture not just the individual itself. In happiness books I believe it is important to correlate happiness between the culture and the individual. Like David points out, a boy in Africa playing with a tin can, can be as happy as Richy Rich in North America and his fully loaded gaming lap top. Obviously our society places too much emphasis on wealth and materialism to fuel our happy cells when perhaps we should be simply fine-tuning our attitudes.
The chapter describing the four traits of happy people is an excellent short list of reasons on why some are cheerful (and some grouchy). I see that they undoubtedly apply to me.
· I like myself . . .(Self Esteem, happy people like themselves).
· My destiny is my own in that I have "earned", a great job, super home, improving golf game and supporting family . . .(Personal Control, happy people choose their destinies).
· I am positive about my future . . .
Read more ›
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By "arnold227" on November 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
I found this book very useful because its not preaching from one point of view, or with one "fool-proof" method. Instead, it is a professional psychologist's survey of research (from over 100 years) that objectively notes characteristics of happy people. It reaffirmed some beliefs I have, and shattered some others (such as more money = more happiness). Overall, this is a very well-researched, and yet pleasant book to read that makes you think about what makes you, the reader, happy in your own life.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Kristina Russell on May 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
David Meyeres does an excellent job of highlighting a subject in which everyone should be more knowledgeable. A great range of information is conveyed in a very organized, clear style. The book is clearly meant for a reader interested in learning more about happiness in detailed depth, without assuming the reader is a Ph.D. psychologist. The points within this book are significant, but Meyers has written the book in such a manner that it is still comprehensive to those beginning their study.
With unhappiness on the upward trend, this book could benefit most anyone. It provides worthwhile facts in a clear, fascinating way. This book is one step closer to achieving a healthier, happier society.
After reading this book for a school assingment, I was very pleased to find I could also take a great deal away and relate it to my own life. Meyers points out several factors interfereing with achieving happiness. This book has helped me identify the sources of my unhappiness, and given me the ability to better enjoy life. My previous perspectives have been improved. I am sure The Pursuit of Happiness could be an aid for anyone feeling mildly unhappy, or those who are merely curious in understanding the fundamentals behind human happiness. This book discusses everything from age, gender, race, social status, marriage, friends, and religion and their impacts on happiness. There are some bits of information which seem to be common sense. However, it is better to know the truth, then assume something incorrectly.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Laurent Grenier on December 10, 2005
Format: Paperback
I first heard of "The Pursuit of Happiness" by David G. Myers as a recommended read in "Psychology Applied to Modern Life" by Wayne Weiten and Margaret A. Lloyd - a truly remarkable textbook. This obviously gives immediate credibility to this book, and I have to say that my personal assessment of it is in keeping with that of the two aforementioned authors.

Take these few quotes as a preview of "The pursuit of Happiness" by David G. Myers, a treasure-trove of modern wisdom:

"Happiness is loving what you do, and knowing it matters."

"Well-being resides not in mindless passivity but in mindful challenge."

"Growing up means gaining the wisdom and skills to get what we want within the limitations imposed by reality."

"... two ways to be rich: One is to have great wealth. The other is to have few wants."

"Realizing that well-being is something other than being well-off is liberating. It liberates us from spending on eighteen-hundred-dollar dresses, on stockpiles of unplayed CDs, on luxury cars, on seagoing luxury homes-all purchased in a vain quest for an elusive joy. It liberates us from envying the life-styles of the rich and famous. It liberates us to invest ourselves into developing traits, attitudes, relationships, activities, environments, and spiritual resources that will promote our own, and others', well-being."

Happy reading!

Laurent Grenier, author of the book "A Reason for Living."
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