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The Pushcart Prize XXXIV: Best of the Small Presses (2010 Edition) Hardcover – November 2, 2009


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Product Details

  • Series: Pushcart Prize
  • Hardcover: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Pushcart Press; 2010 Edition edition (November 2, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1888889551
  • ISBN-13: 978-1888889550
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 0.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,384,279 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This year's Pushcart anthology offers consistently good prose and poetry that covers a broad range of styles and topics. On the historical front, Tied to History by Greil Marcus and A Poetics of Hiroshima by William Heyen are among several pieces that reinvigorate well-plowed terrain from WWII, while Return to Hayneville by Gregory Orr offers a shocking true tale of police rounding up, imprisoning and battering peaceful protestors in the segregated South. Contemporary standout pieces from J.C. Hallman (Ethan: A Love Story) and Charles McLeod (Edge Boys) mine the rich veins of, respectively, video games and suburban teenage prostitution. But not all of the pieces work: two of the unsuccessful stories in this volume—Mary Gaitskill's The Arms and Legs of the Lake and Brock Clarke's Our Pointy Boots—are failed efforts to interrogate the realities of troops returning from the second Iraq War. The anthology is at its most innovative with its poetry, which surpasses the prose in experiments with language and form. (Nov.)
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From Booklist

The Pushcart Prize collections provide an invaluable record of the most artistic facet of American letters, while editor Bill Henderson’s introductory essays, or what he calls his “annual sermon,” succinctly critique the ups and downs of the publishing world, which is taking its hits along with every other pillar of civilization in the current financial crisis. But Pushcart, a hands-on and sustainable endeavor (Henderson affectionately refers to it as a “funky little commune”), continues to support and celebrate the fruits of small presses and the so-called little literary magazines, considering more than 7,000 entries as they built this year’s brimming, vibrant anthology, the perfect introduction to new writers and adventurous new work by established writers. This particular gathering is extraordinary in its range of voices and subjects, and in the contributors’ passion for language, story, and hidden truths. Here are poets undaunted, including Sallie Tisdale and Paisley Rekdal; daring fiction writers such as Richard Powers and Brock Clarke; and deeply inquisitive essayists, among them Ginger Strand and Lia Purpura. Here is literature to have and to hold. --Donna Seaman

More About the Author

Amos Magliocco is the author of Remedy Wheel, current semifinalist in Amazon's 2011 Breakthrough Novel Contest. A winner of the Pushcart Prize, his stories and essays have appeared in Redivider, Isotope, Yemassee, The Missouri Review, Poets & Writers, among many other journals. He holds an MFA from Indiana University and teaches writing and literature at the University of North Texas.

He lives in Denton, Texas and in the springtime chases storms and tornadoes across the Great Plains. In 2007 he survived a direct strike from a tornado in Tulia, Texas (an experience described in his essay "Put on the Petty") and collected pressure data that were later verified as the sharpest barometric pressure fall recorded on Earth to date. The tornado was at the time a "single cell vortex," sort of a dust devil with a bad attitude.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mary Bast on December 13, 2010
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I'm almost embarrassed to admit this is the first time I've read a Pushcart, after knowing of Pushcart awards for many years. There are so many small presses these days, the Pushcart is more relevant than ever (and this issue runs around 500 pages). It is more representative of already well-known writers or those who have been nominated by already well-known writers than of new writers, which means (a) it's not a venue for newbies and (b) the contents are absolutely top-quality writing.
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If you don't already pick up a copy of The Pushcart Prize winners every year, then you are doing yourself an amazing disservice because this really is a collection of the best stuff that happened in the literary word (excluding novels) that year. This edition has a story called Put On The Petty by Amos Magliocco, which I believe to be astounding. Of course, everything in the book is good. If you are a lover of reading, and want to see what modern-lit looks like then pick these up.
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This is an excellent resource for readers or writers - introduced me to tons of wonderful new writers, as well as publications I'd never heard of (I only wish I could afford to subscribe to all of them!). More importantly, I've thoroughly enjoyed most of the pieces I've read. Favorites were "The Homing Device Comprehended at Last" by Liz Waldner (poem), "Work and Industry in the Northern Midwest" by Luther Magnussen, and "Modulation" by Richard Powers. I haven't made it through every single piece because this is a dense 500 page book, but I'm very impressed so far. Even if I hate the rest of them, I'd still give it 4 stars.
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3 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Windiciti on July 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
Given that the 2010 edition has the same editor as last year---Bill Henderson--and the 2009 edition was so mediocre, I would not BUY this book for my collection.
Read my review for last year's compendium. Perhaps checking it out of the library to see if you like it might be a good solution.
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