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The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds

5 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0198238386
ISBN-10: 019823838X
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Editorial Reviews

Review


The book is at its best when it is distinguishing between the various versions of the Everett interpretation, and would certainly be useful to anyone who whishes to pursue Everett's approach. Barrett wisely separates out what can be reasonably ascribed to Everett, and what work remains to turn Everetts writings into a complete interpretation. Barrett does a good, clear job with this material and reader interested in the Everett tradition will likely find things that are useful for their purposes. The Philosophical Review


About the Author


Jeffrey Barrett is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Irvine.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (April 13, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019823838X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198238386
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 0.9 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,694,654 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
This book was a wonderful delving into the problems of Modern Quantum Theory as it stands. The book explains such a developed and difficult to (conceptually) understand topic in very simple terms from start to finish.
It begins by exploring simple examples such as the 2 slit experiment and the spin of electrons. It then moves onto explaining the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, bare theory, and then continuing with the problem of determinism.
Personally, I found many of the ideas presented in this book difficult to understand at first, and on multiple occasions had to read over sections 2 or 3 times. Although, this is no fault of the author, he explains everything very well.
I think this book is suited to anyone who is already familar with the basic foundations of quantum mechanics (like a first year undergraduate physics course) and wants to learn about the underlying fundamental ideas, formalisms and flaws of modern quantum theory.
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Format: Paperback
For someone interested in understanding quantum mechanics on a historical and conceptual level, this book does an excellent job. There is limited reliance on math, and the text is clear enough that one can even gloss over much of the math that is there.
Importantly (I think), is the even-handed portrayal of the standard interpretation of QM and how it's apparent acceptance in the mainstream is neither historically nor logically fully supported. The assumption that because reality appears to follow the mathematical formula does not necessarily imply that the interpretation of the formula 'explains' the basis of reality or even that QM constitutes the most basic level of reality.
The author uses many quotes, but always in a way that fits in nicely with the storyline.
Although, ostensibly written around a critique of Everett's contributions to QM, the author seems more to use that more as a reference or counterpoint for his own exposition of the problems and issues regarding QM.
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Format: Paperback
8/8/10

This text, appears to have shot a line straight through computing!
Mr Barrett's use of Skyrms' definition of a strange attractor, in this context, may have allowed research to expand the number of axiomatic components which define. So now we are being inundated with processor cores, two, four, eighty. This will be because, deeply and deftly concealed within the book is likely to be a suggestion as to which element can appropriately replace that of point density.
To quote the Portishead music CD, Dummy: I found the bones, of all your ghosts, locked in the wishing well!
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