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The Queen [Blu-ray]


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The Queen
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The Queen [Blu-ray] + The Young Victoria [Blu-ray] + Duchess, The [Blu-ray]
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Product Details

  • Actors: Helen Mirren, Michael Sheen
  • Directors: Stephen Frears
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Miramax
  • DVD Release Date: April 24, 2007
  • Run Time: 103 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (560 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000NTPDK0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #159,721 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Queen [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Special Features

  • The Making Of The Queen
  • Movie Showcase

Editorial Reviews

The Queen takes audiences behind the scenes of one of the most shocking public events of recent times – the sudden death of Princess Diana in August of 1997. In the immediate aftermath of the Princess’ passing, the tightly contained, tradition-bound world of the Queen of England (Dame Helen Mirren) is abruptly brought into conflict with the slick modernity of the country's brand new, image-conscious Prime Minister, Tony Blair (Michael Sheen). The result is an intimate, yet thematically epic, battle between private and public, responsibility and emotion, custom and action – as a grieving nation waits to see what its leaders will do.

Customer Reviews

Helen Mirren does a great job as Queen Elizabeth.
Kay
A newly elected Tony Blair immediately gives a speech but the royal family isolate themselves in Balmoral and refuse to acknowledge Diana's death publicly.
Co-editors Nancy Gray and Dennis Field
The Queen is an easy film to like and one of the rare films that actually makes you feel good.
Doug Anderson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

138 of 157 people found the following review helpful By Andy Orrock VINE VOICE on November 5, 2006
Format: Theatrical Release
Helen Mirren is getting the requisite kudos for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth. But there's another portrayal in Stephen Frears' excellent film of an equally public figure that is going relatively overlooked: Michael Sheen's spot-on take on Tony Blair. I was totally mesmerized at just how perfectly Sheen had both the look and feel of the unbridled optimism of TB at the outset of his first term. That's key because it's Blair's intuition on the matters at hand here that are instrumental in shaking the Royal Family out of their tone-deaf dismissal of the unfolding events across the country.

It's interesting to see the portrayals here and see how harsh or sympathetic they are (Mirren's Elizabeth is complex and beyond analysis here):

Prince Philip - A devastating take on him

Price Charles - Painted very sympathetically by Alex Jennings, but obviously cowed by his mother

Alastair Campbell - A very positive take on New Labour's wordsmith by Mark Bazeley (I'm a big Campbell fan, so it was good to see the script honor his contributions to Blair's early successes).

Queen Mom - Yikes! Not a very pretty picture

Frears' delicate and respectful approach keeps William and Harry just off the picture.

What will really take you about the movie is this: as many reviewers here note, they found themselves strangely moved and shocked by Diana's death, like she was a member of the family. When those scenes play out here, wow, you'll be quite surprised at the emotions that well up in you. It will happen. Trust me.

Frears - as pitch-perfect movie helmsman - includes the stirring end portion of the eulogy penned and intoned by Charles, Earl of Spencer (Diana's brother).
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264 of 306 people found the following review helpful By ewomack TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 17, 2006
Format: Theatrical Release
Monarchs have always faced threats to their thrones. So much so that royal history, burgeoning with fiendish conspiracies, violent plots, and gruesome assassinations, sometimes reads like a slasher novel. A few recent films have fully exploited this theme. 1998's "Elizabeth", starring the should-have-won-an-Oscar-for-this-role Cate Blanchett as Elizabeth I, revolved around an assassination attempt that included the queen's lover. On a less violent theme, Judy Dench, in "Mrs. Brown", depicted Queen Victoria's "trist" with a Highlander that had all of England alight with scandal. Has a new "threatened queen" genre emerged? Apparently so. Enter a rare film about a living monarch who finds her crown imperiled in an astonishingly novel way. For once Her Majesty can watch the drama she lived reemerge in celluloid - not that she probably wants to. Though the film sports a prosaic title, "The Queen", it boldly explores uncharted territory. Here the Queen, reigning in the late twentieth century hinterland between monarchy and non-monarchy, finds herself attacked by her own people. And she, much like the great-great-grandmother she shares with her husband, was not amused.

The film opens as Queen Elizabeth II sits for a regal portrait. Her world unfolds as the royal portraiteer dotes on his imperial subject. Then, in a "we're not in Kansas anymore" flash, the newly elected Tony Blair explodes onto the screen. The now ex-Prime Minister receives voluminous coverage for a movie entited "The Queen." One memorable early scene shows Blair bowing on one knee as the Queen inquires as to his desire to serve the nation. He answers "yes." That probably didn't give too much away. Both figures, Sovereign and Prime Minister, share the spotlight and their disparate worlds collide after catastrophe strikes.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By DAVID BRYSON VINE VOICE on June 10, 2007
Format: DVD
There are several themes to this excellent and most original and interesting film; but what it is about more than anything else is how political regimes and whole dynasties can be undone on account of a single error of judgment. It is only near the end that Her Majesty warns her prime minister that this will happen to him, and happen suddenly and without warning. It had nearly happened to her, he had been the saving of her on this occasion, and her dire prediction for him probably holds an uneasy message for herself too.

At the start the Queen is full of regal self-assurance, neatly putting her boyish and slightly nervous novice of a prime minister in his place by telling him he is sitting where Churchill once sat. In next to no time the positions are reversed, as Blair's acute political antennae tell him that HM is in imminent danger of losing her subjects' allegiance, something that would have been unimaginable only days previously, through trusting her own judgment and listening to the advice of her husband and her mother in respect of how to react to the death of Princess Diana. Throughout the crisis Blair is adroit and sure-footed, the monarch is made to realise bitterly from the newspapers how he has it right and she has been hopelessly at sea, but unlike her family counsellors she has the wit to swallow her pride and retrieve the situation before it slides beyond retrieval. This one incident could have undone a lifetime of unswerving dedication, universally acknowledged, to her country, and put the skids under the House of Windsor itself. Her warning to Blair is really made from a new sense of respect and a shocked realisation of how quickly and brutally the tables can turn. And how right she has been.
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