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The Queen's Necklace Paperback – July 3, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager; 1St Edition edition (July 3, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380789116
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380789115
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #896,343 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this tongue-in-cheek fantasy, Edgerton's first since 1995's The Moon and the Thorn (the concluding volume of her Chronicles of Celydonn trilogy), ancient Maglore Goblins and humans battle for control of the Lesser Goblin Jewels, artificial gemstones that can absorb and channel the Universal Magnetism. Set in a vaguely Franco-British world of court intrigue, magic and wonderfully imaginative nonsense, this sometimes charming mishmash unfortunately concentrates on cardboard characterizations of an assortment of humans, such as Captain Wilrowan Krogan-Blackheart, his somewhat reluctant wife, Lilliana Brakeburn-Blackheart, a Specularii magician-in-training and their cohorts. The problem: the goblins (and the religious zealot, Raith, who may or may not be evil) are far more interesting. The Maglore royalty, thought long-since dead and without power over their former human slaves, are represented by Ys, a petulant goblin orphan princess rescued by the imperious Valentine Solange and Lady Sophronispa. Whenever they take the stage, the story sizzles. The result is that the reader finds the longing for Maglore victory almost irresistible. Convoluted plotting and multiple flashbacks, flashforwards and extraneous details slow the pace and make for impatient reading. Edgerton, author also of the Green Lion trilogy (The Child of Saturn, etc.), is capable of better. Nonetheless, fans who've long been waiting for a new Edgerton should gobble this one up.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

When the ancient race of goblin sorcerers begins a new onslaught on the humans they once enslaved, Wilrowan Blackheart, captain of the Queen's Guard, must undertake the dangerous task of preserving the freedom of his people. The author of The Moon and the Thorn crafts a detailed fantasy world in which goblins and humans vie for power and a strange Chaos Machine threatens the balance of the world. For most fantasy collections.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Teresa Edgerton is the author of eleven novels, as well as short fiction, reviews, interviews, and articles on writing.

She believes she has been telling stories since she first learned to talk. Sixty years later, she is still inventing them.

Largely unaware, when she began to write seriously, of the realities of publishing, it took her almost ten years to finish, sell, and see her first novel published. Ignorance may not be bliss, she says, but it can be a great encouragement in situations where someone wiser and better-informed might have walked away. That first novel, Child of Saturn, was a finalist for the Compton-Crook award.

Having (temporarily) slaked her thirst for epic fantasy by writing one trilogy, she went on to write the dark/alchemical fairy tale, Goblin Moon. It enjoyed a modest success at the time, and gained an enthusiastic following over the next two decades.

She currently lives with her husband, three adult children, a son-in-law, a daughter-in-law-elect, two grandsons, assorted pets, and more books than you might think would fit in the remaining space.

____________

Teresa has also written two books under the pseudonym Madeline Howard. You can find those books on amazon, too. Look for "The Hidden Stars" and "A Dark Sacrifice."

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Denise B. Tanaka on August 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
Make a pot of herb tea. Find a comfy armchair. Sit back, relax, and enjoy your visit to Teresa Edgerton's world. "The Queen's Necklace" is a rich, intriguing tale full of complex individuals and spectacular settings. It has as many plot twists as a spy thriller, that is, if spies could weave spells in jewelry and mirrors. The world resembles Europe at the time of the French Revolution. There is a plethora of corsets and puffy dresses, and men in powdered wigs and long coats, rendered in such detail as to make you think the author has the whole cast's wardrobe tucked away in her closet. Each city is a character in itself, and the author illustrates them in glorious panorama. No detail is overlooked, from tea, toast and chocolates, to the frightening beauty of the crystal heart on the enchanted necklace. She skillfully weaves the history of a whole world into a handful of pages. The sexual tension between the two main characters has an interesting twist: they're already married. But although they love each other, they have trouble showing it. He's a bit of a scalawag, and also a competent swashbuckling captain of the guard. She's secretly training in the magic arts and is not afraid to go into the dark alleys on the wrong side of town. They're both trying to save the world, but it's harder when they don't cooperate and confide in each other. Five thousand years before, Goblins were the dominant race. There are layers of Goblin cities in ruins beneath the human architecture, and remnants of enchanted "machinery" that the humans use but don't fully understand. Goblins come in all shapes and sizes. The Padfoots and the Wrynecks are easily spotted in a crowd, but some are as handsome or beautiful as humans. They move among the people as evil undetected, like Dracula in a tuxedo. If you've read Teresa Edgerton's other books, then you'll enjoy this one. "The Queen's Necklace" is a masterpiece of story-telling craftsmanship.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
Fantasy of Manners returns to the bookstore with this long-awaited new work by Teresa Edgerton. The world is one of courts and courtiers, a patchwork of minor kingdoms, each with its own secret device, the magical key to its prosperity. Each kingdom guards its own secret jealously from the others, but while human spies infest the courts, an older menace plots to win a greater prize: the restoration of the ancient empire of the Maglore goblins, who once ruled them all.
This book has it all: intrigue, derring-do, mystery and romance. A delight.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rodney Meek VINE VOICE on November 20, 2001
Format: Paperback
Back when I was a lad, the release of a new fantasy novel would be greeted with an excited (if unimaginative) yelp of, "Oh, boy, a new fantasy novel!" Now, given the glut of works on the fantasy market, a new release only merits a yawn and a disinterested, "Oh, boy, a new fantasy novel." (Sadly, my way with words has not improved with the years.) This book is, unfortunately, not the one to inspire me with renewed enthusiasm.
It breaks away from the Dark Ages/valiant Celts and medieval England/oppressive church settings that have been so popular in recent years, I'll give it that much. Its particular milieu of stable and prosperous duchies and principalities is equivalent to, say, our own mid to late 1700s in terms of technology. There are guns and clocks and operas and newspapers and the like. There's also a small degree of swashing and buckling and scattered bits of magic, the latter mainly in the form of relics from the vanquished Goblin Empire of 1,500 years ago.
The plot centers on the attempts of the long-thought-dead Maglore elite to overthrow the human interlopers and resurrect their lost empire. To this end, they begin to pilfer the hidden Goblin Jewels that are magically supporting each of the hundred or so human kingdoms, while simultaneously insinuating one of their own as the consort of a vulnerable human king. Standing against this conspiracy are the usual valiant stalwarts, primarily an estranged husband and wife, the one a guardsman and the latter a magician. For the most part, though, the defenders of goodness are a drab lot, with the exception of Raith.
The villains are scarcely better, since they tend to explode in fiery ruin if someone looks cross-wise at them.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
Good-hearted Willrowan and appealing Lili are the hero and heroine of this convoluted sword-and-spell tale taking place in moldering old cities, amid ancient magic half-understood. They are almost overshadowed by fascinating side characters: Raith, Luke, Ys, and the dangerous Sopronisba. The story could have used some editing, both in structuring subplots and in excising the occasional regency-romance trite expression (why is brown hair always 'chestnut'?), also in smoothing out the places where the narrative falters in favor of a mini-lecture on history.
But those are minor glitches. The good news is that there are enough threads left dangling to promise a sequel, and perhaps Edgerton will find her stride. It's certainly worth buying.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mrs C. Laurie on September 22, 2001
Format: Paperback
Having previously read, and thoroughly enjoyed, a lot of books by this author - The Green Lion Trilogy, The Chronicles of Celydonn, etc - I was seriously looking forward to this one. Unfortunately this one is NOT in the league of her other novels, the plot is thin and unengaging, the characters are flat and rarely interesting, I just couldn't bring myself to care what happened to them at all. My best advice is this: if you are a fan of Teresa Edgerton's work, do yourself a favour, keep your good opinion intact and AVOID this one!
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