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64 of 69 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2014
Again, Critics be damned! This is a great thinking-persons horror film in which the story is executed so intricately that by the end, it will have even the most rational rattled and giving their own interpretation! The scares are harmless at first but then intensify to an, almost, unbearable finale! This film has great performances and is a spooky good time into the unknown! Does it bring anything new to the table? Not really but what is delivered is done so with ease, precision and intelligence. A horror film doesn't need to break new ground to be a good horror film, which is probably why some are claiming it's disappointing. We are so lucky to have Hammer back on the scene! Lets hope we get more great stuff from the brand that started it all!
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41 of 46 people found the following review helpful
on May 31, 2014
Very entertaining, but it's not making any "top" lists this year. This film was good-but-mismanaged and found greatness out of reach due to weak story synthesis and character development. However, this movie is rich with charm, jumps and excellent production value. So watch it with a date instead of with a horror snob.

Loosely based on a true experiment that took place in Oxford in 1974, this film delves deep into the notion that what we commonly consider "the supernatural" actually represents telekinetic and "teleplasmic" manifestations of the minds of disturbed believers. Led by Professor Coupland (Jared Harris; Poltergeist), graduate students Krissy (Erin Richards) and Harry (Rory Fleck-Byrne; Vampire Academy) and videographer Brian (Sam Claflin; Snow White and the Huntsman, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire) band together to investigate the psychic phenomena produced by the suicidal young Jane (Olivia Cooke; Bates Motel) with hopes of "curing" her.

From Act One to the next weird things happen, Coupland's methods are called into question as Jane's health is placed at increasing risk, and Coupland shifts from methodical to manic in his obsession to cure her. Both Coupland and Brian share a competitive interest (almost a sexual fixation) in saving her, but go about doing so by conflicting means. Jared Harris' psychological descent is impressive and committed whereas Sam Claflin embraces his character's own brand of emotional fragility.
This film was filled with entertaining moments including shocking effects, gripping jump scares and some long scenes tensed up with a solid creep factor. I'd add that the acting was very good; great, in fact, for a horror film. Olivia Cooke managed to capture crazy, disturbed, scary, dangerous and sympathetic all at once. The style of the film goes from something like a "house" movie, to a demonic possession movie, and then to something altogether different which I don't want to spoil (not that it's anything super special). However, as the story shifted gears from skeptical science and rational explanations to "what have we gotten ourselves into?" I found myself generally uninvested in the characters and the outcome. Don't get me wrong, the movie is not without its charm, I enjoyed it and was entertained, and I really "liked" the characters. The thing is, their "development" didn't lead me anywhere interesting. And whereas the facets of the story (and the scenes behind them) were independently interesting, they failed to find any of that effective and satisfying synthesis that makes us care if the protagonists succeed.

Director John Pogue (The Skulls, Quarantine II) may not have wowed us with this film's story synthesis. But, given his résumé, this represents a good step forward in his professional development and I must admit that it was very entertaining. However, the premise itself is more interesting than its execution. It won't please gore hounds or story snobs who pine only for unique horror fare--and who, might I add, are almost never 100% happy with what they're served--but it will please the popcorn "movie night" guys who just want to see good effects, enjoy acting that doesn't hurt their soul, and laugh at well-placed jump scares. It would probably be a good scary movie on date night as well. Had it only balanced its writing with its quality scares, acting, ideas and filming with a better screenplay, this would have been quite good instead of good-but-mismanaged.

To the less-initiated and perhaps younger horror fan, this PG-13 film may serve as a great introduction to horror. Those who aren't overly critical or "so tired" of loud-noise induced jump scares should get a real kick out of this. What it lacks in character development and cohesiveness it more than makes up for with jumpy scares, neat effects, minimal gore, great acting, solid production value and a cool premise.
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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on June 11, 2014
Finally..A decent horror/ ghost film that is GOOD and not a remake.

From the very start you get pulled in. Your eyes are glued to the screen and you are almost afraid to blink.

The scare factors are not based around "monsters" per say. No creepy killer lurks around the corner with a giant knife..but the paranormal presence is what grabs you.

I won't get into detail. .no spoilers..but what hooked me was this... The film was based on actual events.

If you loved The Conjuring. .you must see this...
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on August 15, 2014
If there’s one thing that can be said about “The Quiet Ones,” it’s that the movie is definitely an extension of Hammer’s classic films of the 1960s. Not content to just throw out some monster scares, they delve into the Satanic cult themes of classics like “The Devil Rides Out,” “To the Devil a Daughter,” and “The Satanic Rites of Dracula.” Although not perfect by any means and a bit confusing in plot if you’re not paying close enough attention, the famous production company delivers a creepy new entry to add to their rich cinematic history.

Much like Hammer’s early works, “The Quiet Ones” is a gothic period piece. However, instead of it taking place in the eerie 1800s or early 1900s, it takes place in the 1970s in a secluded and mysterious mansion. A University professor (Jared Harris) leads a group of students in an experiment to help an emotionally disturbed young woman. Jane Harper (Olivia Cooke) believes she is followed by a sinister spirit who manifests itself through violent outbursts. Is something supernatural occurring or is Jane somehow willing herself to harm others and wreak havoc wherever she goes?

“The Quiet Ones” is rated PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and terror, sexual content, thematic material, language, and smoking throughout. There are also a couple scenes of brief nudity of the male and female persuasion. The brief nudity was so quick it could have been completely cut out in editing.

It might not be the greatest example of a modern Hammer horror film, but “The Quiet Ones” does successfully carry the torch passed on by so many great genre classics of the past many grew up watching. It has all the ingredients you’d expect from the English House of Horror, though they might not follow the recipe as closely as you’d hope. Chillingly convincing performances from Olivia Cooke and Jared Harris more than make up for any narrative muddiness viewers might find themselves wading through.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
This is a sleeper horror movie that's light on gore and CGI and heavy on atmosphere, and despite an average script features some convincing acting especially from Olivia Cooke, without whom the whole thing probably wouldn't work. The phrase "Based on real events" has never been stretched further since almost every character and event in the film is completely fictitious, yet as a work of total fiction does successfully set up a paranormal mystery that keeps the audience engaged and interested all the way to the dubious climax. While this isn't going to win any Oscars or make any "Best of 2014" movie lists, it's refreshing to see a well acted horror with minimal ambitions that executes reasonably well. Reality does occasionally come knocking on the door of disbelief but for the few scares it has, I was pleasantly surprised.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on August 21, 2014
This movie was better than I thought it was going to be. British horror movies on the most part are usually done well and this is no exception. The acting was top notch. That aside this movie is more creepy than scary. Some people might not like the fact that this is an intelligent horror film without things jumping out at you every two seconds. Nice little surprise of a film. I enjoyed it.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on August 18, 2014
The Quiet Ones is a dud. A dispiriting truth since it is a rare release by Hammer, the once-legendary, then-defunct, now-revived British production company who defined the genre in the nation in the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. This new film includes halfhearted nods toward the best and brightest of Hammer, including a Gothic rural estate where much of the action unfolds, but its various elements and tensions never adhere into a satisfying whole, and it is at times downright daft and dull. Jared Harris and his cigarettes star as an Oxford academic who is trying to prove unwell people can manifest phenomena. He rolls his eyes at the notion of magic, but is certain people can start fires and move furniture with their minds as long as they are, I don't know, super insane. In this film's world, however, he is positioned as the staunch defender of the rational awaiting an education by demon fire. With two students and a local cameraman, he retires to the aforementioned estate to research and treat (read: torture) one Jane Harper, a troubled woman with a long history of foster families and purported supernatural abilities.

There is an interesting story buried in this film: one of a perfectly volatile pairing of a self-righteous, unyielding doctor and a desperate patient who at once justify and harm one another, caught in a dance of death disguised as unconventional treatment. Harris is a capable actor who plays convincing notes of tenured pomposity, and relative fresh face Olivia Cooke has an engaging and otherworldly quality as the put-upon Jane, creating a character who is both menacing and melancholy. Alas, the potent qualities they generate are adrift in an uneven bump-in-the-night film which relies far, far too much on standard-issue "boo" jolts and slams harshly into a wall of pitiful nonsense in its ear-punishing, I.Q.-lowering third act.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Oxford Professor Joseph Coupland (Jared Harris) leads a pair of student researchers plus a camera man, known as the "quiet ones" to discover and cure the insanity of Jane Harper (Olivia Cooke) through experimental means. Dr. Coupland believes Jane has "negative energy" that manifests itself into telekinetics which can be controlled to cure the patient. Belief in the supernatural is not tolerated.

During the process, Brian (Sam Claflin) the camera man develops mutual feelings for Jane who has an imaginary demon named Evie. The time frame for this film is 1974 and it makes use of Slade's "Come On Feel the Noise." Early in the movie, the funding for the experiment gets cut so Brian volunteers to use cheaper lower quality film, just what I wanted to hear. Part of the movie is amateur hand held genre while some of it is not.

The film scare factor doesn't pick up until about an hour into it. It then has some bad minor clue twists which didn't help the film's cause.

Might work as a cheap rental. Not overpowering.

Parental Guide: 2 f-bombs. Implied sex. Brief nudity.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Nine Things about the Movie “The Quiet Ones” (United Kingdom, 2014)

1.For a horror movie, “The Quiet Ones” is well-named.

2. It’s set at Oxford University in 1974. A professor has custody of an insane young woman who thinks she’s possessed. The professor hires three young assistants to help him with experiments to “cure” her.

3. The professor believes that the girl isn’t really possessed, but does have telekinetic powers that she doesn’t understand or know how to control. His experiments are basically psychological and physical torture techniques that will upset the girl enough to let out her “demon” so they can discover what’s really going on.

4. As the movie progresses, and the girl can’t get her demon to come out, the young assistants begin to suspect that maybe the whole thing is a hoax, or that the professor is obsessed with the girl.

5. The movie gets points for actually talking about real science and hypotheses, and how experiments can be contaminated. It’s also cool to watch the 1970’s setting and scientific technology.

6. The actual story is pretty interesting. But it’s not very scary; it’s more of a drama. So the director had to put in a few stupid “jump scares” just to make something happen.

7. The movie does a good job of building a creepy, moody drama where you aren’t sure exactly what the deal is. After awhile, the possessed girl seems less threatening than the professor in charge of her.

8. Unfortunately, the movie doesn’t know how to end - the “solution” just comes out of nowhere to tie things up in a sudden and shocking way. It basically makes the rest of the movie pointless. I don't really even understand what happened.

9. As a psychological drama, this is a pretty interesting, stylish story. But as a horror movie, it’s at first kind of boring and then rather ridiculous.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 4, 2014
Well done, old boy. This movie is a slowly-developing investigation into a possession that turns ever more twisted and frightening. The premise is interesting: save the girl from a "demon" constructed by her own mind and harness that psychic power . . . somehow. It's not really explained HOW the good professor thinks he is going to get at this psychic energy. But that's ok, because the first step in this ambitious project is separating the girl from her imaginary friend. Who turns out to be a hell of a lot more real than psychic.

Set in the 1970's, before cell phones and the internet, and all kinds of tech that might save you from demons, the film captures the essence of life back then. Makes the tale more terrifying too.

The five characters are unique, at odds with one another often enough, and yet devoted to helping the mentally disturbed and power-manifesting (possessed) girl. They play off each other well and create tension.

But there are secrets within this group. There are secrets within the possessed girl. And sometimes little girls don't want to give up their demons. Uh oh. Things get revealed. Things get naughty, terrifying, and quite interesting. Yes, there are slow reveals. If you stick with the movie, it is quite disturbing.

Performances are perfect. Especially Jared Harris' role. The camera work is great--not annoying or nauseating like Blair Witch. It's a movie that sometimes uses hand-held perspectives.

The title is stupid. It has nothing to do with the plot. The plot itself is great, but it has NOTHING to do with the actual real-life events it is "based" on. The actual project was about creating a ghost from psychic energy and interacting with it. The only connection this film has with THAT is the professor's belief that the possessed girl's demon is a created phenomenon.

So, WATCH IT. It will have easily-scared folks pooping their pants unexpectedly, and horror buffs will appreciate its different take on handling a possession.
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