Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Quilters: Women and Domestic Art, an Oral History Paperback – June 15, 1999


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, June 15, 1999
$117.50 $7.35

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 159 pages
  • Publisher: Texas Tech University Press (June 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896724107
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896724105
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 8.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #321,679 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Those forms of creativity dominated by women-weaving, potting, quilting-have long been called "crafts," as if to imply that women weren't capable of artistic inspiration. These domestic arts were, however, often the only artistic outlet historically available to women, and the skills were passed down from mother to daughter. Poignantly revealed here, through interviews with quilters all over the Southwest, is how these women gained inspiration for their art from their daily lives. The quilts aren't idle pictures to hang on the wall; they are alive as dynamic parts of everyday life, reflecting family, community and history. -- From The WomanSource Catalog & Review: Tools for Connecting the Community for Women; review by FGP --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

When I was about four years old the neighbor's baby died, and all the women was called in to help. Mama knew what her part was because right away she took some blue silk out of her hope chest. I remember that silk so well because it was special and I got to carry it. When we got to the neighbor's some of the women was cooking and the men was making the casket. Mama and three other women set up the frame and quilted all day. First they quilted the lining for the casket, and then they made a tiny little quilt out of the blue silk to cover the baby. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
14
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 14 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
The words of the quilters, their faces, the photograps of the places and of the quilts that figured so strongly in their lives--these give us a profound human experience. I have seen, and very much enjoyed, the play that was adapted from this book. The book itself is more intimate and more powerful. You get to know these women, and you're glad to have had the chance.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. Elliott on December 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have read many books about pioneering women who set up homes from scratch and quilted for practical and soul-fulfilling reasons. Usually though, those women are long gone and we are left with rather dry details of their lives. The joy of this book is that the women whose words are recorded in it are living, breathing members of that pioneer group, and, even though their experiences were in the 20th rather than the 19th century,the issues and incidents are the same and they tell a vibrant story.
The book records conversations amongst Texas quilting groups, to which the authors were invited and the ladies seem eager to tell stories of their early days in dug outs and cabins, their families scaping a life from the soil and their role in that. None of them ever sound hard done by or as if they wish their lives had been different. And they are all keen to express the creative and fulfilling role that quilting has had in their lives.
If you are not a quilter, you will still enjoy the strength, friendship and nobility that run through these conversations - they are a link with a passed era, which I felt honoured to share as I read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
Strength and courage comes tumbling out of the words of these women of the Southwest, just as the colors came tumbling out of their scrap bags. From these they created spectacular quilts to counter life in homes dug into the earth, dust storms, and the incessant sound of wind. Busy fingers gave solace as they faced the loneliness of a land "stretched flat to the edge of the sky". I found these accounts to be profoundly moving. This is not a "how to quilt" book, but a compassionate account of the texture and fiber of the lives of pioneer women. It's impact continued when a play, "The Quilters", based on the book, became an internationally successful Tony nominated Broadway play.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
The Quilters is an absolute gem of a book! It's a thoughtful tribute to extraordinary women who invented an art form out of scraps of cloth to record and celebrate the domestic events of families and communities living in places and times that were uniquely un-domesticated. Walter Prescot Webb, the great historian of the Great Plains, suggested the West was domesticated by the six-shooter, barbed-wire, and the spirit of remarkable men. He should have also noted the dogged spirit of the women who were The Quilters!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 2, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is facinating with it's history of American pioneer women. It contains real quotes from real people about the lives that they lived. If you have seen or been in the play you will be delighted to see that some of the show's monologues are word-for-word from this book! I't's a moving book and a moving play.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have always been interested in women's history as told through useable arts such as quilts. This book is a masterpiece at combining oral history with wonderful personal stories and beautiful photographs. It's a must for anyone interested in women's history, historical anthrpology, women's studies, or US history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Crazy quilter on July 2, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Quilters: Women and the Domestic Art, an Oral History is an inspirational story that looks at quilting and women. I was lent this book by a friend at a patchwork group in Australia. From the time I picked up this book to the time I finished it nothing else mattered. To read about women's lives through the medium of patch working and quilting was quite amazing.
I think in todays modern world we have forgotten that quilting is not only about making something beautiful but is also about not wasting anything. It is also about something functional. Quilters are also about love. Love of quilting and love for the people we make them for.
I also learnt that you do not need to have a lot of money to make something of wonder and joy for people you love or even people you have never met. You just have to feel the need to do it. Also, I am grateful for all the modern conveniences we have for quilting today.
This book was so good that after I finished reading it I immediately logged on to Amazon to buy a copy for myself and my friends. If you would like to read a heart warming story and then to share it with your friends then this is the book for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?