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The Rabbit Problem Hardcover – November 2, 2010


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; Nov Pop edition (November 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1442412550
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442412552
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,616 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 1-5–If a pair of rabbits is put together under certain conditions (“NO Rabbits may leave the field”), how many will there be in one year? This puzzle, posed by Fibonacci in the 13th-century, is the premise for Gravett's latest work. The cover depicts a bemused rabbit calculating at a blackboard. The endpapers cast a wider view, with more of the problem shown visually and verbally. Readers follow a rabbit through an underground tunnel (title page) and emerge from a die-cut hole into a field –at the top of a calendar. As always, Gravett's design choices are perfect for enhancing the narrative. Now viewers turn the book lengthwise and watch the effects of the ever-multiplying bunnies in watercolor scenes on the top, while the hand-lettered notes and novelty items glued to the dates below reveal seasonal challenges. In March, while the stressed parents learn infant care, a baby book showcases a tiny ultrasound of the twins. July depicts bored bunnies watching carrots grow. A miniature newspaper (The Fibber) includes biographical information on the famous mathematician, personals, birth announcements, graphs, and horoscopes. Under an empty, snow-covered field and through the die-cut hole that follows December 31, a peek and a page turn reveal the population explosion leaping, literally, off the page in a sturdy pop-up spread. This hilarious (and accurate) tale can be enjoyed by the numerically challenged and gifted alike.–Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review

* "In Gravett’s gifted hands, an old math problem springs to life—and more life and more life! Medieval mathematician Fibonacci’s “rabbit problem,” in which bunnies breed at a specified rate, provides the structure of this glorious faux–wall calendar that watches a rabbit community from January to December...Readers needn’t care about the math of Fibonacci Numbers to love the hilarious, jam-packed visual details, many of which are playfully metatextual...Endless fun to pore over for kids and math-minded or geeky adults.--Kirkus Reviews, starred review

* "Whimsical ideas proliferate as fast as rabbits in Gravett's splendid sendup of Fibonacci's query."--Publishers Weekly, starred review

"This hilarious (and accurate) tale can be enjoyed by the numerically challenged and gifted alike."--School Library Journal

More About the Author

Emily Gravett is the author and illustrator of Spells, The Odd Egg, Little Mouse's Big Book of Fears (winner of the Kate Greenaway Medal), Monkey and Me and Meerkat Mail. Her first book, Wolves, was the winner of the Kate Greenaway Medal and the Boston Globe/Horn Book Honor Award for Illustration. Her second book, Orange Pear Apple Bear, a Quills Award finalist and on the shortlist for the Kate Greenaway Medal, was a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year and a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year. Emily lives in Brighton, England, with her partner, their daughter, and the family dog.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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A beautiful book.
Sharon Fruchtman
The Rabbit Problem is a thought provoking and highly contagious book that will delight adults and children alike.
Larissa
It is a children's book.
Michael Cunha

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By R. Guthrie on September 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I saw this beautifully designed book at our local children's bookshop, and just had to buy it. My husband loves mathematics, so I knew that he would love the Fibonacci references and the conclusion of the book. I'm quite sure our 3 1/2 year old doesn't have clue what the point of the book is, but he loves all the interesting rabbit pictures and detail. I don't think this is a children's book : with text for adults, pictures and pop-ups for children, it really falls between two stools.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Larissa on September 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
In 1175 there lived an Italian mathematician named Fibonacci who, during his life set himself a mathematical challenge. If a pair of baby rabbits are put into a field, how many will there be; a) At the end of each month? b) At the end of each year? This book puts this challenge to the test, and the answer may just surprise you.

Lonely Rabbit sits in a field waiting for a friend. She is the first rabbit to arrive at Fibonacci's Field until Chalk Rabbit arrives. But does one plus one really equal two? Not where rabbits are concerned. This is what happens when you put two baby rabbits in a field for one year. This is more then just a mathematical problem, it a Rabbit Problem.

Lonely Rabbit and Chalk Rabbit are about to learn a lesson in multiplication as well as survival as they face the ups and downs of living a year in Fibonacci's field. It is not just the extreme conditions of snow and heat, but also famine and obesity, a plague of crows, and overpopulation that will test this pair throughout the year.

The Rabbit Problem is a thought provoking and highly contagious book that will delight adults and children alike. The attention to detail is stunning and the spectacular ending alone is enough to recommend this book. With its many fun activities, from knitting patterns and recipes, to its beautiful and vibrant illustrations, this book will be a valuable addition to any bookcase.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Rabbit on November 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
As a rabbit volunteer at our local stray animal shelter this book says it all, in a charming engaging way. I want to put it in every veterinary office and in our public library system. (By the way rabbits don't reproduce until they are between 4 and 6 months, but everything else is exactly right. )

The pop-up at the end reminds me of the Best Friends 1,000 bunny rescue in Nevada in which I was privileged to participate for a couple of days.

You will love this book, for its charm and whimsey, but its message is dead on - unfortunately for the many bunnies that are euthanized each year.

Please promote spay and neuter for rabbits.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Debnance at Readerbuzz on December 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Just when you think you've seen it all in the world of children's picture books, you run into The Rabbit Problem. No one would say that this is just another children's picture book. Then again, Emily Gravett has never been known for being ordinary. Here are all the ways this book goes beyond ordinary:

(1) The Rabbit Problem is a book formatted like a calendar.
(2) The calendars, one for each month of the year, include attachments, including invitations, a baby book, and a cookbook, all three-dimensional.
(3) The story is told through scribbles on the calendar and the attachments. Very, very clever.
(4) We know what is coming and yet we are totally unprepared for the gravity of the problem as it unfolds, depicted with hilarious illustrations illustrating each month of the year on the calendar.

Summary: If grownups were the target audience for this picture book, I feel certain it would fall in the top ten this year.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Trisha S on March 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
One lonely rabbit in a field sends an invite to any who want to join her. So one rabbit becomes one pair of rabbits and they have a pair of rabbits and they become 3 pairs and so on and so on. Only trouble is there is a sign that says "No rabbits may leave the field" So the population number in the field keeps going up just like the Fibonacci sequence. The book is set up as a year calendar with cute pictures of long eared rabbits and cardboard notes that you can read, Bunny's first month, Food Ration book, Carrot cookbook, etc. The last page is a pop-up full of rabbits. I think picture wise it's find for kids but mom and dad will really get it. Great gift idea.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ulyyf on January 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This isn't a storybook. Instead, it's a calendar with flaps and pop-out options that has pithy comments on it related to Fibbonacci's rabbit problem. And, indeed, his rabbit problem is illustrated with, well, the illustrations. Every month we see more and more rabbits. The math is going to sail over the head of most preschoolers (other than "rabbits have a lot of babies"), and there's no clear idea of how to follow the text.

That doesn't mean this is a bad book. Actually, it's hilarious, something you don't always get to say about mathy books. It's just not a STORY book. It's good, though, for older kids who can read it on their own... especially if they're discussing this sort of problem in their math class. Also? Fun for adults. VERY.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Marsha Croft on June 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a math teacher in middle school, I ABSOLUTELY LOVE THIS BOOK! What an interesting and creative way to teach the Fibonacci sequence. I highly recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on January 24, 2011
Format: Hardcover
THE RABBIT PROBLEM may be based on a book solved in the 13th century by mathematician Fibonacci, but it's not actually a book about math - it's the story of too many rabbits. While its pop-ups and fold-outs are not suitable for the rigors of library lending, THE RABBIT PROBLEM does pack in colorful, whimsical and fun pages perfect for parent/child interactions. Hours of delight are promised in this whimsical, fun survey!
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