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The Radical Disciple Paperback – January 15, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Inter-Varsity Press (January 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844744213
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844744213
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,436,372 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

If this book of reflections on what it means to be a faithful Christian nonconformist has a poignant quality, it is not solely because its author, one of the world's leading evangelical preachers and writers, ends it with the word: Farewell! The author of Basic Christianity and Why I Am a Christian focuses what is likely his final written work eight aspects of Christian practice that he feels are not taken seriously enough. These include nonconformity, Christlikeness, maturity, care for the creation, simplicity, balance, dependence, and death. Of particular interest are the author's ideas on materialism and where Christians are asked to be active in advocating and practicing social and ecological justice. While the writer's unadorned prose, threaded with biblical references, adheres to the essentials of Christianity orthodoxy, his deep concern for the prophetic and evangelical dimensions of Christianity comes through loud and clear. This slim volume will have special meaning for admirers, but it may also touch those unacquainted with this longtime evangelical lion as his public voice falls silent. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"Dr. Stott has gone to be with the Lord but he has left behind for us a rich legacy of biblical expression. Read his final words in The Radical Disciple." (John Lathrop, The Pneuma Review, Spring 2012)

"This book will be a rich inheritance for the evangelical community for decades to come." (Brad Sumner, Mennonite Brethren Herald, May 2010)

"Considered a dean of evangelical leaders of the last half century, Stott still deserves to be heard when he speaks. He continues to be relevant in analyzing destructive philosophical and lifestyle trends. As he approaches the end of his own life, he has provoking, yet comforting thoughts regarding the deaths of believers . . . An emphatic yes for church and Bible-college libraries." (Church Libraries, Fall 2010)

"Knowing this is Stott's final book, especially poignant are final chapters on dependence and death. Readers will reap the fruits of the author's solid grasp of Scripture and life experience. Highly recommended for anyone desiring to live an authentic Christian lifestyle." (Neil Bartlett, CBA Retailers & Resources, August 2010)

"Stott's writing is still crisp, cutting, and insightful, and his life-long love and devotion to God comes through clearly in every word of this challenging and encouraging book." (Jeff Friend, Worship Leader Magazine)

"While the writer's unadorned prose, threaded with biblical references, adheres to the essentials fo Christianity orthodoxy, his deep concern for the prophetic and evangelical dimensions of Christianity comes through loud and clear." (Publisher's Weekly, April 12, 2010)

"This slim volume is good reading, a lovely immersion into the truth of God's revelation in Scripture, full of wise words for those who find themselves on a pilgrimage through a dark world towards a City filled with divine light. The Radical Disciple is more like what I imagine he might say to a young friend who is accompanying him to the place of his retirement, and who has the chance to listen in on what Stott is most exercised to pray for when he thinks of the church he has served so faithfully for so many years. It isn't the final word, perhaps, but it's a timely one, and a word of wisdom worth heeding." (Dennis Haack, Critique, 2010)

"This is a (nearly) pocket-sized summary of practical and biblical wisdom from one of the giants of evangelical Christianity in the last century—one of those books that takes an hour or two to read and months to digest. Besides, who doesn't want to buy John Stott's last book?" (Leadership Journal, September 2010,) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

This book fits most of John Stott's writings.
C. Dean Waterman
And so in this book he seeks to consider eight characteristics of Christian discipleship that, though they deserve to be taken seriously, are too often neglected.
Tim Challies
It's as good as any book on encouraging and challenging us in the way of being a disciple of Christ.
A. Morgan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Michael Thompson on May 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"As I lay down my pen for the last time at the age of eighty-eight . . ."

One of the most influential Christian leaders of the Twentieth Century has given us his final work, and is retiring from public service in the kingdom. He does so having made an extensive contribution to the worldwide church, as a pastor and church leader as well as a scholar and theologian.

This book is a brief statement on the nature of the Christian life, which is an appropriate place for Stott to close out his career. Although it is small in size, there is great challenge found in this volume. Its subtitle is Some Neglected Aspects of Our Calling - a presentation of those areas which define the church, but which have often gone unnoticed and under-emphasized. There are eight chapters, which each take a particular area for investigation and challenge: Nonconformity, Christlikeness, Maturity, Creation Care, Simplicity, Balance, Dependence, Death.

The overall focus of the book fits with the title, and is geared to move the reader to a more dedicated commitment to the demands of kingdom life and growth. While there might be points at which the modern reader would choose to part company with Mr Stott (his assumption of the impact of anthropogenic global warming might not be so readily accepted by those of us who know that the facts are not supportive of the theory), overall his emphasis and message is good.

This is among the final fruits of a life given to the service of the kingdom, given to us by one who himself has chosen to be - every step of the way - a radical disciple.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A. Morgan on June 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Quite simply this is classic Stott. Most of what he writes in this book he has written else where. But that really does not matter. Having Stott's thoughts on discipleship compiled in one volume is wonderful. John Stott is one of the most important and influential evangelical, Anglican figures in the last 100 years. A new generation of ministers are enjoying his writings afresh, and this volume should be a favorite. Short and concise each chapter brims with Stotts indubitable style and wisdom.

The final chapter, on death, was my favorite. His wisdom, humility and honesty (he is 87 years of age and, as he says, he is reflecting on death and seeking to prepare for it) was touching. This is a book which should be given away. It's as good as any book on encouraging and challenging us in the way of being a disciple of Christ.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Peter Butler Jr. on April 17, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In what John Stott calls his final book, The Radical Disciple: Some Neglected Aspects of Our Calling, he seeks to address eight areas in which he believes the Church is lacking.

He begins by explaining that by "radical disciple," he wants to emphasize the teacher-student relationship between Christ and the Christian, as well as the necessary deep-rootedness of commitment that Jesus requires from His disciples (14-15).

First, Stott argues that we have not exemplified nonconformity. Rather, we have sought escapism or conformism, Nonconformity is "a call to engagement without compromise" (19).

Second, Christlikeness. Stott argues that The Westminster Shorter Catechism is not strong enough - what God has called us to is to become like Christ. We are to be like Him in being incarnational, servants, loving, patience in enduring, and like Him in His Mission (31-34).

Third, maturity. Stott argues the greatest problem of the modern church is "growth without depth" (38).Maturity comes as one gets a clear portrait of Jesus through prayer and study of the Scripture (48).

Fourth, Creation care. Stott explains tat both dominion and being created in the image of God bear on our stewardship responsibility to care for the Creation, as well as the Scripture's teaching that the Creation will be restored on the last day - not destroyed. (I found this the weakest chapter because he does not explain how to care for the Creation.)

Fifth, simplicity. Not asceticism, but biblical simplicity. Rather that explain this briefly as Stott does with his other chapters, he prints the entire document, An Evangelical Commitment to Simple Life-Style (65-82).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By George P. Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 15, 2014
Format: Hardcover
John Stott died in 2011, but his legacy lives on through his writings. The Radical Disciple is his final book, which he self-consciously wrote as a “valedictory message.” In eight short chapters, simply written but spiritually deep, Stott addresses “some neglected aspects of our [Christian] calling.” They are nonconformity, Christlikeness, maturity, creation care, simplicity, balance, dependence, and death.

Stott’s concern throughout the book is the discrepancy between Christians’ stated beliefs and their actual behavior. “Why do you call me, ‘Lord, Lord,’” Stott quotes Jesus saying in Luke 6:46, “and not do what I say?” Radical discipleship, then, is “wholehearted discipleship,” a form of following Jesus that is not “selective” about “which commitment suits us” and avoids those areas which are “costly.”

The “neglected aspects of our calling” relate to Western Christians’ practice of the faith. Were Stott writing at a different time or for different readers, no doubt his list would’ve looked different. As it is, the eight aspects he identifies have a prophetic edge to them.

Two chapters in particular struck me with particular force. The first is chapter 5 on simplicity. This is the book’s longest chapter and includes excerpts from “An Evangelical Commitment to Simple Life-Style,” published by the Lausanne Committee in 1980. Americans—Westerners more generally—are among the world’s wealthiest persons by any imaginable metric. We are used to high levels of consumption. Unfortunately, American Christian giving habits have been declining for decades. The solution is a simple lifestyle that minimizes consumption and maximizes generosity.

The second is chapter 7 on dependence.
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More About the Author

John R. W. Stott is known worldwide as a preacher, evangelist and communicator of Scripture. For many years he served as rector of All Souls Church in London, where he carried out an effective urban pastoral ministry. A leader among evangelicals in Britain, the United States and around the world, Stott was a principal framer of the landmark Lausanne Covenant (1974). His many books, including Why I Am a Christian and The Cross of Christ, have sold millions of copies around the world and in dozens of languages. Whether in the West or in the Two-Thirds World, a hallmark of Stott's ministry has been expository preaching that addresses the hearts and minds of contemporary men and women. Stott was honored by Time magazine in 2005 as one of the "100 Most Influential People in the World."