Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.75
  • Save: $7.24 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by -TextbookRush-
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All orders ship SAME or NEXT business day. Expedited shipments will be received in 1-5 business days within the United States. We proudly ship to APO/FPO addresses. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Raft Paperback – December 9, 2008


See all 52 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.51
$15.11 $12.19
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$6.00
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books


Frequently Bought Together

The Raft + Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
Price for both: $28.03

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: BiblioLife (December 9, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0559836392
  • ISBN-13: 978-0559836398
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #924,080 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From AudioFile

The Raft is a soldier's straightforward report of his thirty-four-day ordeal adrift in a tiny raft in the Pacific with two other men and almost no equipment or supplies during WWII. The story is engaging by reason of its remarkable events, rather than any felicity of style or depth of reflection. Assuming the almost self-effacing character of a seasoned trooper, Tom Parker lets events speak for themselves, without adding gratuitous melodrama. His qualities as a seasoned reader make for effortless listening. This isn't a display vehicle for the performer, but it's a well-projected document of compelling interest. J.N.ÊÊ (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
34
4 star
15
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 52 customer reviews
Very short survivor story book that was hard to put down and good read.
Katmai
He was ever a modest and friendly man, willing to share his story with family and friends, but always thankful to still be alive !
Bob
To stop reading the book is like asking the survivors to wait one more day in the raft.
Deanna Anderson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By JOHN GODFREY on April 24, 2003
Format: Audio Cassette
I first read it in junior high school 35 years ago. Took me about two seatings to read it . Very engrossing for a seventh grader.
It is a straight ahead narrative about three ordinary but resourcefull sailors whose plane went down & they were marooned in a rubber raft on the vast ocean during World WarII. They fought off starvation, heat, boredom & all the dangers the ocean affords. Boys will like it even though it doesn't have the violence of most war stories. Tom Parker delivers the telling in a good tight reading style that captures the tone of the story with out adding or detracting from the natural drama. Easy to stay with on a long drive.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By L.A. Pastula on April 26, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Thanks everyone for the great reviews!! I must however point out that being the neice of Anthony Pastula and Gene Aldrich that this book is somewhat misleading, basically because it is from one person's viewpoint that had to be the hero. The plane, btw, didn't exactly crash. After being told several times by both my Uncles that they were running out of fuel, IT RAN OUT OF GAS!!! Not something the hero of his book would confess to I suppose. My Uncle's were also not helpless, uneducated, weaklings as they are sometimes made out to be either. They weren't that GREEN. They also had nothing to do with this book, because obviously, their recounts of their time at sea didn't match Dixon's. They both chose to step out of the spotlight and go on with their lives. For those that did wonder in the other reviews, they not only remained the closest of friends but they became brother-in-laws! Gene married Tony's sister. To add to that, Gene's sister married Tony's brother and that's where I come from! It is truly by the grace of God and Gene's strong personal believe in the Lord that he shared with the other two men that saved them.
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mark Riordan on December 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is an account of 3 crewmembers of a ditched bomber surviving for 34 days in a very small, ill-equipped raft. The story is interesting enough to tell itself, so I felt that the straightforward writing style was quite appropriate.
Although the book was actually written by a journalist, it is written in the first person as if the pilot, Harold Dixon, were telling the tale.
The events occurred in early 1942, and the book was also published in 1942. The edition I read was the original, and did not mention John M. Waters anywhere, so I don't know why his name is listed as an author in the 1992 reprint.
The fact that this book was written shortly after Pearl Harbor is borne home by the fact that there are several details (such as the location of the island where they washed up) that the author omits "for reasons of national security". Also, the jacket of the original 1942 edition says "When you have finished reading this book, don't just place it on a shelf. Our men need books as well as guns. Books build morale. Send this book today. Average book requires 6 cents postage." They give the address of the 4th Corps Area Headquarters in Atlanta.
If you enjoy this sort of tale, you'll probably also like "Adrift: Seventy-six Days Lost at Sea", by Steve Callahan, a bit more philosophical account of his more recent lone ordeal in the Atlantic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Charles Ashbacher HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 22, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In 1942, the American military was heavily engaged in fighting the Japanese in the Pacific theater. After the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor, U. S. and Allied military forces were in full retreat everywhere. The U. S. aircraft carriers regularly sent up patrol plains searching for the enemy. At that time, navigation was not yet precise and radio silence had to be maintained. Therefore, a plane sent out sometimes had difficulty finding their way back.
Such a plane was piloted by Chief Petty Officer Dixon and his crew of two, Tony Pastula and Gene Aldrich. Losing their bearings while on patrol, the plane ran out of fuel and splashed down, sinking quickly. It sank so fast that there was no time to recover their emergency rations, so they had little more than the blowup boat and the clothes they wore.
For thirty-four days, they floated, drinking the rainwater they could capture and eating what raw fish and bird meat they could catch. Finally, they drifted to a small, inhabited island where the leader had a radio. They were able to send a message out and were rescued shortly after.
This book is the story of their ordeal, how they managed to keep everything together as they floated across the Pacific It is a story of survival against the odds and is an uplifting story, one that was badly needed in 1942 when it appeared that the Japanese forces were unstoppable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
I am a high school English teacher and have used this book in my classes for over twenty years. This is a story that will capture the most reluctant readers and transport them to the South Pacific of 1942 where, along with Harold Dixon, Gene Alrich, and Tony Pastula, they will fight for their lives in a seemingly hopeless situation: adrift at sea in a four by eight foot rubber life raft for thirty-four days and nights -- an inspiring and memorable read!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
I first read this book over 20 years ago as a book-of-the-month paperback selection in jr high school. It is still a fascinating, true life survival story. But rereading it as an adult I find some interesting questions arise that I had not considered back then. Such as, it seems that Dixon is given too much credit for their survival when in fact it was his navigational errors that led to the ditching of the plane in the first place. The story was told by Dixon to a reporter and it is not surprising therefore that he comes off the best of the three. In the story for instance he always refers to the others as "boys" and tends to downplay their contributions. It is interesting that the "boys" became lifelong friends and had little to do with Dixon after the rescue. I think it would have been interesting to hear their version of the story and compare it with Dixon's. Nevertheless, what these three sailors managed to live through and triumph over, is truly inspirational and fascinating reading. I definitely recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?